Publications by authors named "Ricardo Bastida"

5 Publications

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Beak deviations in the skull of Franciscana dolphins Pontoporia blainvillei from Argentina.

Dis Aquat Organ 2016 Jun;120(1):1-7

Instituto de Investigaciones Marinas y Costeras (IIMyC), Departamento de Ciencias Marinas, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata-CONICET, Funes 3350, B7602AYL Mar del Plata, Argentina.

The Franciscana dolphin Pontoporia blainvillei is characterized by a long rostrum, a feature that is shared with the families formerly classified as river dolphins (Pontoporiidae, Platanistidae, Iniidae, Lipotidae). Although there are occasional reports on the existence of beak deformations, very little published information exists describing this process. The object of the present study was to describe and quantify the beak anomalies of Franciscana dolphins from the coastal waters of Argentina. Of 239 skulls analyzed 12% showed beak deviations (BD), affecting the premaxillary-maxillary and dentary bones to different extents. The occurrence of BD in the dentary bone represented 58%, whereas premaxillary-maxillary BDs were observed in 14% of the studied specimens, while the complete rostrum (dentary, premaxillary and maxillary) was affected in 28% of the skulls. Dorsoventral axis BD was more frequent than lateral BD (48 and 38%, respectively), and double BD was only observed in the dentary bone. Most of the BD observed in this study could be classified as mild/moderate, and we assume that it did not affect the feeding activities of individuals; however, 2 specimens (<1%) showed a severe and complex curvature that probably did affect them. The cause of these anomalies (natural or anthropogenic origins) is unknown but may be related to important parasite loads, heavy metal and organic contaminants and plastic ingestion that could affect the coastal dolphin in different ways. A more detailed and thorough study of these cranial anomalies is necessary.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3354/dao03012DOI Listing
June 2016

Pre-Columbian mycobacterial genomes reveal seals as a source of New World human tuberculosis.

Nature 2014 Oct 20;514(7523):494-7. Epub 2014 Aug 20.

1] Department of Archaeological Sciences, University of Tübingen, Ruemelinstraße 23, 72070 Tübingen, Germany [2] Senckenberg Centre for Human Evolution and Palaeoenvironment, University of Tübingen, Tübingen 72070, Germany [3] Max Planck Institute for Science and History, Khalaische Straße 10, 07745 Jena, Germany.

Modern strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis from the Americas are closely related to those from Europe, supporting the assumption that human tuberculosis was introduced post-contact. This notion, however, is incompatible with archaeological evidence of pre-contact tuberculosis in the New World. Comparative genomics of modern isolates suggests that M. tuberculosis attained its worldwide distribution following human dispersals out of Africa during the Pleistocene epoch, although this has yet to be confirmed with ancient calibration points. Here we present three 1,000-year-old mycobacterial genomes from Peruvian human skeletons, revealing that a member of the M. tuberculosis complex caused human disease before contact. The ancient strains are distinct from known human-adapted forms and are most closely related to those adapted to seals and sea lions. Two independent dating approaches suggest a most recent common ancestor for the M. tuberculosis complex less than 6,000 years ago, which supports a Holocene dispersal of the disease. Our results implicate sea mammals as having played a role in transmitting the disease to humans across the ocean.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nature13591DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4550673PMC
October 2014

Plastic ingestion in Franciscana dolphins, Pontoporia blainvillei (Gervais and d'Orbigny, 1844), from Argentina.

Mar Pollut Bull 2011 Aug 25;62(8):1836-41. Epub 2011 May 25.

Instituto de Investigaciones Marinas y Costeras, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata, Funes 3350, (7600) Mar del Plata, Argentina.

Plastic debris (PD) ingestion was examined in 106 Franciscana dolphins (Pontoporia blainvillei) incidentally captured in artisanal fisheries of the northern coast of Argentina. Twenty-eight percent of the dolphins presented PD in their stomach, but no ulcerations or obstructions were recorded in the digestive tracts. PD ingestion was more frequent in estuarine (34.6%) than in marine (19.2%) environments, but the type of debris was similar. Packaging debris (cellophane, bags, and bands) was found in 64.3% of the dolphins, with a lesser proportion (35.7%) ingesting fishery gear fragments (monofilament lines, ropes, and nets) or of unknown sources (25.0%). PD ingestion correlated with ontogenetic changes in feeding regimes, reaching maximum values in recently weaned dolphins. Because a simultaneous increase in gillnet entanglement and the bioaccumulation of heavy metals take place at this stage, the first months after trophic independence should be considered as a key phase for the conservation of Franciscana dolphin stocks in northern Argentina.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.marpolbul.2011.05.003DOI Listing
August 2011

Corynosoma australe Johnston, 1937 and C. cetaceum Johnston & Best, 1942 (Acanthocephala: Polymorphidae) from marine mammals and fishes in Argentinian waters: allozyme markers and taxonomic status.

Syst Parasitol 2005 Jun;61(2):143-56

Laboratorio de Parasitología, Departamento de Biología, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata, Funes 3350, 7600 Mar del Plata, Argentina.

Genetic and morphological studies were carried out on acanthocephalans belonging to Corynosoma Lühe, 1904 and referable to the species C. cetaceum Johnston & Best, 1942 and C. australe Johnston, 1937, which were recovered from both definitive and intermediate hosts in Argentinian waters. The aims were to estimate the level of genetic differentiation between the two taxa at any stage of their life-cycle, to provide genetic (allozyme) markers for their recognition and to analyse the systematic status of both taxa. Acanthocephalans were collected from the stomach and intestine of Arctocephalus australis (Zimmerman), the intestine of Mirounga leonina (Linnaeus) and the stomach of Pontoporia blainvillei Gervais & D'Orbigny (definitive hosts) in Argentinian waters. Alternative alleles at all the 13 enzymatic loci studied were observed for C. australe and C. cetaceum. The specimens from the stomach of both P. blainvillei and A. australis were identified, on the basis of the great number of diagnostic loci found, as C. cetaceum; those from intestine of both A. australis and M. leonina as C. australe. A high level of genetic differentiation (D(Nei)=infinity: I(Nei)=0.00) between the two taxa was found, suggesting a generic distinction between the two species. Cystacanths of the two species from the body-cavity of the fish Cynoscion guatucupa (Cuvier) collected from the same geographical area were identified genetically. Morphological patterns, such as the number of hooks and hook rows on the proboscis, the distribution of somatic and genital armature, and other morphometric and meristic differences, in addition to ecological data, enabled the identification of these two species at cystacanth, juvenile and adult stages. However, a number of morphological and morphometric features of the Argentinian material were different to those of C. australe and C. cetaceum described from other regions of the world.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11230-005-3131-0DOI Listing
June 2005

Tuberculosis in seals caused by a novel member of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex: Mycobacterium pinnipedii sp. nov.

Int J Syst Evol Microbiol 2003 Sep;53(Pt 5):1305-1314

Departamento de Micobacterias, DILACOT, Servicio Nacional de Sanidad y Calidad Agroalimentaria (SENASA), Avda A Fleming 1653, (1640) Martínez, Argentina.

A comparison of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex isolates from seals (pinnipeds) in Australia, Argentina, Uruguay, Great Britain and New Zealand was undertaken to determine their relationships to each other and their taxonomic position within the complex. Isolates from 30 cases of tuberculosis in six species of pinniped and seven related isolates were compared to representative and standard strains of the M. tuberculosis complex. The seal isolates could be distinguished from other members of the M. tuberculosis complex, including the recently defined 'Mycobacterium canettii' and 'Mycobacterium caprae', on the basis of host preference and phenotypic and genetic tests. Pinnipeds appear to be the natural host for this 'seal bacillus', although the organism is also pathogenic in guinea pigs, rabbits, humans, Brazilian tapir (Tapirus terrestris) and, possibly, cattle. Infection caused by the seal bacillus is predominantly associated with granulomatous lesions in the peripheral lymph nodes, lungs, pleura, spleen and peritoneum. Cases of disseminated disease have been found. As with other members of the M. tuberculosis complex, aerosols are the most likely route of transmission. The name Mycobacterium pinnipedii sp. nov. is proposed for this novel member of the M. tuberculosis complex (the type strain is 6482(T)=ATCC BAA-688(T)=NCTC 13288(T)).
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1099/ijs.0.02401-0DOI Listing
September 2003