Publications by authors named "Rhonda E Schnur"

51 Publications

Bi-allelic variants in SPATA5L1 lead to intellectual disability, spastic-dystonic cerebral palsy, epilepsy, and hearing loss.

Am J Hum Genet 2021 10;108(10):2006-2016

Institute of Human Genetics, Klinikum rechts der Isar, School of Medicine, Technical University of Munich, 81675 Munich, Germany.

Spermatogenesis-associated 5 like 1 (SPATA5L1) represents an orphan gene encoding a protein of unknown function. We report 28 bi-allelic variants in SPATA5L1 associated with sensorineural hearing loss in 47 individuals from 28 (26 unrelated) families. In addition, 25/47 affected individuals (53%) presented with microcephaly, developmental delay/intellectual disability, cerebral palsy, and/or epilepsy. Modeling indicated damaging effect of variants on the protein, largely via destabilizing effects on protein domains. Brain imaging revealed diminished cerebral volume, thin corpus callosum, and periventricular leukomalacia, and quantitative volumetry demonstrated significantly diminished white matter volumes in several individuals. Immunofluorescent imaging in rat hippocampal neurons revealed localization of Spata5l1 in neuronal and glial cell nuclei and more prominent expression in neurons. In the rodent inner ear, Spata5l1 is expressed in the neurosensory hair cells and inner ear supporting cells. Transcriptomic analysis performed with fibroblasts from affected individuals was able to distinguish affected from controls by principal components. Analysis of differentially expressed genes and networks suggested a role for SPATA5L1 in cell surface adhesion receptor function, intracellular focal adhesions, and DNA replication and mitosis. Collectively, our results indicate that bi-allelic SPATA5L1 variants lead to a human disease characterized by sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) with or without a nonprogressive mixed neurodevelopmental phenotype.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ajhg.2021.08.003DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8546233PMC
October 2021

Biallelic loss-of-function variants in the splicing regulator NSRP1 cause a severe neurodevelopmental disorder with spastic cerebral palsy and epilepsy.

Genet Med 2021 Dec 12;23(12):2455-2460. Epub 2021 Aug 12.

Texas Children's Hospital, Houston, TX, USA.

Purpose: Alternative splicing plays a critical role in mouse neurodevelopment, regulating neurogenesis, cortical lamination, and synaptogenesis, yet few human neurodevelopmental disorders are known to result from pathogenic variation in splicing regulator genes. Nuclear Speckle Splicing Regulator Protein 1 (NSRP1) is a ubiquitously expressed splicing regulator not known to underlie a Mendelian disorder.

Methods: Exome sequencing and rare variant family-based genomics was performed as a part of the Baylor-Hopkins Center for Mendelian Genomics Initiative. Additional families were identified via GeneMatcher.

Results: We identified six patients from three unrelated families with homozygous loss-of-function variants in NSRP1. Clinical features include developmental delay, epilepsy, variable microcephaly (Z-scores -0.95 to -5.60), hypotonia, and spastic cerebral palsy. Brain abnormalities included simplified gyral pattern, underopercularization, and/or vermian hypoplasia. Molecular analysis identified three pathogenic NSRP1 predicted loss-of-function variant alleles: c.1359_1362delAAAG (p.Glu455AlafsTer20), c.1272dupG (p.Lys425GlufsTer5), and c.52C>T (p.Gln18Ter). The two frameshift variants result in a premature termination codon in the last exon, and the mutant transcripts are predicted to escape nonsense mediated decay and cause loss of a C-terminal nuclear localization signal required for NSRP1 function.

Conclusion: We establish NSRP1 as a gene for a severe autosomal recessive neurodevelopmental disease trait characterized by developmental delay, epilepsy, microcephaly, and spastic cerebral palsy.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41436-021-01291-xDOI Listing
December 2021

Haploinsufficiency of SF3B2 causes craniofacial microsomia.

Nat Commun 2021 08 3;12(1):4680. Epub 2021 Aug 3.

Department of Pediatrics, Division of Craniofacial Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA.

Craniofacial microsomia (CFM) is the second most common congenital facial anomaly, yet its genetic etiology remains unknown. We perform whole-exome or genome sequencing of 146 kindreds with sporadic (n = 138) or familial (n = 8) CFM, identifying a highly significant burden of loss of function variants in SF3B2 (P = 3.8 × 10), a component of the U2 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein complex, in probands. We describe twenty individuals from seven kindreds harboring de novo or transmitted haploinsufficient variants in SF3B2. Probands display mandibular hypoplasia, microtia, facial and preauricular tags, epibulbar dermoids, lateral oral clefts in addition to skeletal and cardiac abnormalities. Targeted morpholino knockdown of SF3B2 in Xenopus results in disruption of cranial neural crest precursor formation and subsequent craniofacial cartilage defects, supporting a link between spliceosome mutations and impaired neural crest development in congenital craniofacial disease. The results establish haploinsufficient variants in SF3B2 as the most prevalent genetic cause of CFM, explaining ~3% of sporadic and ~25% of familial cases.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41467-021-24852-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8333351PMC
August 2021

Biallelic and monoallelic variants in PLXNA1 are implicated in a novel neurodevelopmental disorder with variable cerebral and eye anomalies.

Genet Med 2021 09 30;23(9):1715-1725. Epub 2021 May 30.

Department of Medical Genetics, Centre for Applied Neurogenetics, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada.

Purpose: To investigate the effect of PLXNA1 variants on the phenotype of patients with autosomal dominant and recessive inheritance patterns and to functionally characterize the zebrafish homologs plxna1a and plxna1b during development.

Methods: We assembled ten patients from seven families with biallelic or de novo PLXNA1 variants. We describe genotype-phenotype correlations, investigated the variants by structural modeling, and used Morpholino knockdown experiments in zebrafish to characterize the embryonic role of plxna1a and plxna1b.

Results: Shared phenotypic features among patients include global developmental delay (9/10), brain anomalies (6/10), and eye anomalies (7/10). Notably, seizures were predominantly reported in patients with monoallelic variants. Structural modeling of missense variants in PLXNA1 suggests distortion in the native protein. Our zebrafish studies enforce an embryonic role of plxna1a and plxna1b in the development of the central nervous system and the eye.

Conclusion: We propose that different biallelic and monoallelic variants in PLXNA1 result in a novel neurodevelopmental syndrome mainly comprising developmental delay, brain, and eye anomalies. We hypothesize that biallelic variants in the extracellular Plexin-A1 domains lead to impaired dimerization or lack of receptor molecules, whereas monoallelic variants in the intracellular Plexin-A1 domains might impair downstream signaling through a dominant-negative effect.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41436-021-01196-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8460429PMC
September 2021

UBA2 variants underlie a recognizable syndrome with variable aplasia cutis congenita and ectrodactyly.

Genet Med 2021 09 26;23(9):1624-1635. Epub 2021 May 26.

National Eye Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA.

Purpose: The human chromosome 19q13.11 deletion syndrome is associated with a variable phenotype that includes aplasia cutis congenita (ACC) and ectrodactyly as specific features. UBA2 (ubiquitin-like modifier-activating enzyme 2) lies adjacent to the minimal deletion overlap region. We aimed to define the UBA2-related phenotypic spectrum in humans and zebrafish due to sequence variants and to establish the mechanism of disease.

Methods: Exome sequencing was used to detect UBA2 sequence variants in 16 subjects in 7 unrelated families. uba2 loss of function was modeled in zebrafish. Effects of human missense variants were assessed in zebrafish rescue experiments.

Results: Seven human UBA2 loss-of-function and missense sequence variants were detected. UBA2-phenotypes included ACC, ectrodactyly, neurodevelopmental abnormalities, ectodermal, skeletal, craniofacial, cardiac, renal, and genital anomalies. uba2 was expressed in zebrafish eye, brain, and pectoral fins; uba2-null fish showed deficient growth, microcephaly, microphthalmia, mandibular hypoplasia, and abnormal fins. uba2-mRNAs with human missense variants failed to rescue nullizygous zebrafish phenotypes.

Conclusion: UBA2 variants cause a recognizable syndrome with a wide phenotypic spectrum. Our data suggest that loss of UBA2 function underlies the human UBA2 monogenic disorder and highlights the importance of SUMOylation in the development of affected tissues.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41436-021-01182-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8463496PMC
September 2021

Variants in the degron of AFF3 are associated with intellectual disability, mesomelic dysplasia, horseshoe kidney, and epileptic encephalopathy.

Am J Hum Genet 2021 05;108(5):857-873

GeneDx, Gaithersburg, MD 20877, USA.

The ALF transcription factor paralogs, AFF1, AFF2, AFF3, and AFF4, are components of the transcriptional super elongation complex that regulates expression of genes involved in neurogenesis and development. We describe an autosomal dominant disorder associated with de novo missense variants in the degron of AFF3, a nine amino acid sequence important for its binding to ubiquitin ligase, or with de novo deletions of this region. The sixteen affected individuals we identified, along with two previously reported individuals, present with a recognizable pattern of anomalies, which we named KINSSHIP syndrome (KI for horseshoe kidney, NS for Nievergelt/Savarirayan type of mesomelic dysplasia, S for seizures, H for hypertrichosis, I for intellectual disability, and P for pulmonary involvement), partially overlapping the AFF4-associated CHOPS syndrome. Whereas homozygous Aff3 knockout mice display skeletal anomalies, kidney defects, brain malformations, and neurological anomalies, knockin animals modeling one of the microdeletions and the most common of the missense variants identified in affected individuals presented with lower mesomelic limb deformities like KINSSHIP-affected individuals and early lethality, respectively. Overexpression of AFF3 in zebrafish resulted in body axis anomalies, providing some support for the pathological effect of increased amount of AFF3. The only partial phenotypic overlap of AFF3- and AFF4-associated syndromes and the previously published transcriptome analyses of ALF transcription factors suggest that these factors are not redundant and each contributes uniquely to proper development.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ajhg.2021.04.001DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8206167PMC
May 2021

Interference of nuclear mitochondrial DNA segments in mitochondrial DNA testing resembles biparental transmission of mitochondrial DNA in humans.

Genet Med 2021 08 12;23(8):1514-1521. Epub 2021 Apr 12.

GeneDx Inc, Gaithersburg, MD, USA.

Purpose: Reports have questioned the dogma of exclusive maternal transmission of human mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), including the recent report of an admixture of two mtDNA haplogroups in individuals from three multigeneration families. This was interpreted as being consistent with biparental transmission of mtDNA in an autosomal dominant-like mode. The authenticity and frequency of these findings are debated.

Methods: We retrospectively analyzed individuals with two mtDNA haplogroups from 2017 to 2019 and selected four families for further study.

Results: We identified this phenomenon in 104/27,388 (approximately 1/263) unrelated individuals. Further study revealed (1) a male with two mitochondrial haplogroups transmits only one haplogroup to some of his offspring, consistent with nuclear transmission; (2) the heteroplasmy level of paternally transmitted variants is highest in blood, lower in buccal, and absent in muscle or urine of the same individual, indicating it is inversely correlated with mtDNA content; and (3) paternally transmitted apparent large-scale mtDNA deletions/duplications are not associated with a disease phenotype.

Conclusion: These findings strongly suggest that the observed mitochondrial haplogroup of paternal origin resulted from coamplification of rare, concatenated nuclear mtDNA segments with genuine mtDNA during testing. Evaluation of additional specimen types can help clarify the clinical significance of the observed results.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41436-021-01166-1DOI Listing
August 2021

CDK19-related disorder results from both loss-of-function and gain-of-function de novo missense variants.

Genet Med 2021 06 25;23(6):1050-1057. Epub 2021 Jan 25.

Laboratory of Gene Regulation, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Toyama, Toyama, Japan.

Purpose: To expand the recent description of a new neurodevelopmental syndrome related to alterations in CDK19.

Methods: Individuals were identified through international collaboration. Functional studies included autophosphorylation assays for CDK19 Gly28Arg and Tyr32His variants and in vivo zebrafish assays of the CDK19 and CDK19.

Results: We describe 11 unrelated individuals (age range: 9 months to 14 years) with de novo missense variants mapped to the kinase domain of CDK19, including two recurrent changes at residues Tyr32 and Gly28. In vitro autophosphorylation and substrate phosphorylation assays revealed that kinase activity of protein was lower for p.Gly28Arg and higher for p.Tyr32His substitutions compared with that of the wild-type protein. Injection of CDK19 messenger RNA (mRNA) with either the Tyr32His or the Gly28Arg variants using in vivo zebrafish model significantly increased fraction of embryos with morphological abnormalities. Overall, the phenotype of the now 14 individuals with CDK19-related disorder includes universal developmental delay and facial dysmorphism, hypotonia (79%), seizures (64%), ophthalmologic anomalies (64%), and autism/autistic traits (56%).

Conclusion: CDK19 de novo missense variants are responsible for a novel neurodevelopmental disorder. Both kinase assay and zebrafish experiments showed that the pathogenetic mechanism may be more diverse than previously thought.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41436-020-01091-9DOI Listing
June 2021

Variants in GNAI1 cause a syndrome associated with variable features including developmental delay, seizures, and hypotonia.

Genet Med 2021 05 20;23(5):881-887. Epub 2021 Jan 20.

Duke University Health System, Durham, NC, USA.

Purpose: Neurodevelopmental disorders (NDDs) encompass a spectrum of genetically heterogeneous disorders with features that commonly include developmental delay, intellectual disability, and autism spectrum disorders. We sought to delineate the molecular and phenotypic spectrum of a novel neurodevelopmental disorder caused by variants in the GNAI1 gene.

Methods: Through large cohort trio-based exome sequencing and international data-sharing, we identified 24 unrelated individuals with NDD phenotypes and a variant in GNAI1, which encodes the inhibitory Gαi1 subunit of heterotrimeric G-proteins. We collected detailed genotype and phenotype information for each affected individual.

Results: We identified 16 unique variants in GNAI1 in 24 affected individuals; 23 occurred de novo and 1 was inherited from a mosaic parent. Most affected individuals have a severe neurodevelopmental disorder. Core features include global developmental delay, intellectual disability, hypotonia, and epilepsy.

Conclusion: This collaboration establishes GNAI1 variants as a cause of NDDs. GNAI1-related NDD is most often characterized by severe to profound delays, hypotonia, epilepsy that ranges from self-limiting to intractable, behavior problems, and variable mild dysmorphic features.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41436-020-01076-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8107131PMC
May 2021

Defining the genotypic and phenotypic spectrum of X-linked MSL3-related disorder.

Genet Med 2021 02 11;23(2):384-395. Epub 2020 Nov 11.

Department of Pediatrics, Section of Genetics, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, CO, USA.

Purpose: We sought to delineate the genotypic and phenotypic spectrum of female and male individuals with X-linked, MSL3-related disorder (Basilicata-Akhtar syndrome).

Methods: Twenty-five individuals (15 males, 10 females) with causative variants in MSL3 were ascertained through exome or genome sequencing at ten different sequencing centers.

Results: We identified multiple variant types in MSL3 (ten nonsense, six frameshift, four splice site, three missense, one in-frame-deletion, one multi-exon deletion), most proven to be de novo, and clustering in the terminal eight exons suggesting that truncating variants in the first five exons might be compensated by an alternative MSL3 transcript. Three-dimensional modeling of missense and splice variants indicated that these have a deleterious effect. The main clinical findings comprised developmental delay and intellectual disability ranging from mild to severe. Autism spectrum disorder, muscle tone abnormalities, and macrocephaly were common as well as hearing impairment and gastrointestinal problems. Hypoplasia of the cerebellar vermis emerged as a consistent magnetic resonance image (MRI) finding. Females and males were equally affected. Using facial analysis technology, a recognizable facial gestalt was determined.

Conclusion: Our aggregated data illustrate the genotypic and phenotypic spectrum of X-linked, MSL3-related disorder (Basilicata-Akhtar syndrome). Our cohort improves the understanding of disease related morbidity and allows us to propose detailed surveillance guidelines for affected individuals.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41436-020-00993-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7862064PMC
February 2021

NCKAP1 Disruptive Variants Lead to a Neurodevelopmental Disorder with Core Features of Autism.

Am J Hum Genet 2020 11;107(5):963-976

Service of Endocrinology, Diabetology, and Metabolism, Lausanne University Hospital, Lausanne 1011, Switzerland.

NCKAP1/NAP1 regulates neuronal cytoskeletal dynamics and is essential for neuronal differentiation in the developing brain. Deleterious variants in NCKAP1 have been identified in individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and intellectual disability; however, its clinical significance remains unclear. To determine its significance, we assemble genotype and phenotype data for 21 affected individuals from 20 unrelated families with predicted deleterious variants in NCKAP1. This includes 16 individuals with de novo (n = 8), transmitted (n = 6), or inheritance unknown (n = 2) truncating variants, two individuals with structural variants, and three with potentially disruptive de novo missense variants. We report a de novo and ultra-rare deleterious variant burden of NCKAP1 in individuals with neurodevelopmental disorders which needs further replication. ASD or autistic features, language and motor delay, and variable expression of intellectual or learning disability are common clinical features. Among inherited cases, there is evidence of deleterious variants segregating with neuropsychiatric disorders. Based on available human brain transcriptomic data, we show that NCKAP1 is broadly and highly expressed in both prenatal and postnatal periods and demostrate enriched expression in excitatory neurons and radial glias but depleted expression in inhibitory neurons. Mouse in utero electroporation experiments reveal that Nckap1 loss of function promotes neuronal migration during early cortical development. Combined, these data support a role for disruptive NCKAP1 variants in neurodevelopmental delay/autism, possibly by interfering with neuronal migration early in cortical development.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ajhg.2020.10.002DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7674997PMC
November 2020

Heterozygous variants that disturb the transcriptional repressor activity of FOXP4 cause a developmental disorder with speech/language delays and multiple congenital abnormalities.

Genet Med 2021 03 28;23(3):534-542. Epub 2020 Oct 28.

Language & Genetics Department, Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.

Purpose: Heterozygous pathogenic variants in various FOXP genes cause specific developmental disorders. The phenotype associated with heterozygous variants in FOXP4 has not been previously described.

Methods: We assembled a cohort of eight individuals with heterozygous and mostly de novo variants in FOXP4: seven individuals with six different missense variants and one individual with a frameshift variant. We collected clinical data to delineate the phenotypic spectrum, and used in silico analyses and functional cell-based assays to assess pathogenicity of the variants.

Results: We collected clinical data for six individuals: five individuals with a missense variant in the forkhead box DNA-binding domain of FOXP4, and one individual with a truncating variant. Overlapping features included speech and language delays, growth abnormalities, congenital diaphragmatic hernia, cervical spine abnormalities, and ptosis. Luciferase assays showed loss-of-function effects for all these variants, and aberrant subcellular localization patterns were seen in a subset. The remaining two missense variants were located outside the functional domains of FOXP4, and showed transcriptional repressor capacities and localization patterns similar to the wild-type protein.

Conclusion: Collectively, our findings show that heterozygous loss-of-function variants in FOXP4 are associated with an autosomal dominant neurodevelopmental disorder with speech/language delays, growth defects, and variable congenital abnormalities.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41436-020-01016-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7935712PMC
March 2021

Boricua Founder Variant in Causes Epileptic Encephalopathy With Hyperkinetic Movements.

J Child Neurol 2021 02 15;36(2):93-98. Epub 2020 Sep 15.

Section of Neurology, Department of Pediatrics, 14521St. Christopher's Hospital for Children Drexel University College of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, USA.

Objective: To describe a founder mutation effect and the clinical phenotype of homozygous c.737_739delGAG (p.Gly246del) variant in 15 children of Puerto Rican (Boricua) ancestry presenting with early infantile epileptic encephalopathy (EIEE-37) with prominent movement disorder.

Background: EIEE-37 is caused by biallelic loss of function variants in the gene, which is critical for AMPA-receptor function, resulting in intractable epilepsy and dyskinesia.

Methods: A retrospective, multicenter chart review of patients sharing the same homozygous (p.Gly246del) pathogenic variant identified by clinical genetic testing. Clinical information was collected regarding neurodevelopmental outcomes, neuroimaging, electrographic features and clinical response to antiseizure medications.

Results: Fifteen patients from 12 different families of Puerto Rican ancestry were homozygous for the (p.Gly246del) pathogenic variant, with ages ranging from 1 to 25 years. The onset of seizures was from 6 to 24 months. All had hypotonia, severe global developmental delay, and most had hyperkinetic involuntary movements. Developmental regression during the first year of life was common (86%). Electroencephalogram showed hypsarrhythmia in 66% (10/15), with many older children evolving into Lennox-Gastaut syndrome. Six patients demonstrated progressive volume loss and/or cerebellar atrophy on brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).

Conclusions: We describe the largest cohort to date of patients with epileptic encephalopathy. We estimate that 0.76% of unaffected individuals of Puerto Rican ancestry carry this pathogenic variant due to a founder effect. Children homozygous for the (p.Gly246del) Boricua variant exhibit a very homogenous phenotype of early developmental regression and epilepsy, starting with infantile spasms and evolving into Lennox-Gastaut syndrome with hyperkinetic movement disorder.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0883073820953001DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8496110PMC
February 2021

Predominant and novel de novo variants in 29 individuals with ALG13 deficiency: Clinical description, biomarker status, biochemical analysis, and treatment suggestions.

J Inherit Metab Dis 2020 11 5;43(6):1333-1348. Epub 2020 Aug 5.

Inova Translational Medicine Institute Division of Medical Genomics Inova Fairfax Hospital Falls Church, Virginia, USA.

Asparagine-linked glycosylation 13 homolog (ALG13) encodes a nonredundant, highly conserved, X-linked uridine diphosphate (UDP)-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase required for the synthesis of lipid linked oligosaccharide precursor and proper N-linked glycosylation. De novo variants in ALG13 underlie a form of early infantile epileptic encephalopathy known as EIEE36, but given its essential role in glycosylation, it is also considered a congenital disorder of glycosylation (CDG), ALG13-CDG. Twenty-four previously reported ALG13-CDG cases had de novo variants, but surprisingly, unlike most forms of CDG, ALG13-CDG did not show the anticipated glycosylation defects, typically detected by altered transferrin glycosylation. Structural homology modeling of two recurrent de novo variants, p.A81T and p.N107S, suggests both are likely to impact the function of ALG13. Using a corresponding ALG13-deficient yeast strain, we show that expressing yeast ALG13 with either of the highly conserved hotspot variants rescues the observed growth defect, but not its glycosylation abnormality. We present molecular and clinical data on 29 previously unreported individuals with de novo variants in ALG13. This more than doubles the number of known cases. A key finding is that a vast majority of the individuals presents with West syndrome, a feature shared with other CDG types. Among these, the initial epileptic spasms best responded to adrenocorticotropic hormone or prednisolone, while clobazam and felbamate showed promise for continued epilepsy treatment. A ketogenic diet seems to play an important role in the treatment of these individuals.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jimd.12290DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7722193PMC
November 2020

De novo variants of NR4A2 are associated with neurodevelopmental disorder and epilepsy.

Genet Med 2020 08 5;22(8):1413-1417. Epub 2020 May 5.

Department of Genetics, University Medical Centre Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands.

Purpose: This study characterizes the clinical and genetic features of nine unrelated patients with de novo variants in the NR4A2 gene.

Methods: Variants were identified and de novo origins were confirmed through trio exome sequencing in all but one patient. Targeted RNA sequencing was performed for one variant to confirm its splicing effect. Independent discoveries were shared through GeneMatcher.

Results: Missense and loss-of-function variants in NR4A2 were identified in patients from eight unrelated families. One patient carried a larger deletion including adjacent genes. The cases presented with developmental delay, hypotonia (six cases), and epilepsy (six cases). De novo status was confirmed for eight patients. One variant was demonstrated to affect splicing and result in expression of abnormal transcripts likely subject to nonsense-mediated decay.

Conclusion: Our study underscores the importance of NR4A2 as a disease gene for neurodevelopmental disorders and epilepsy. The identified variants are likely causative of the seizures and additional developmental phenotypes in these patients.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41436-020-0815-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7394879PMC
August 2020

Lysine acetyltransferase 8 is involved in cerebral development and syndromic intellectual disability.

J Clin Invest 2020 03;130(3):1431-1445

Department of Clinical Genetics, Amsterdam University Medical Center, Amsterdam, Netherlands.

Epigenetic integrity is critical for many eukaryotic cellular processes. An important question is how different epigenetic regulators control development and influence disease. Lysine acetyltransferase 8 (KAT8) is critical for acetylation of histone H4 at lysine 16 (H4K16), an evolutionarily conserved epigenetic mark. It is unclear what roles KAT8 plays in cerebral development and human disease. Here, we report that cerebrum-specific knockout mice displayed cerebral hypoplasia in the neocortex and hippocampus, along with improper neural stem and progenitor cell (NSPC) development. Mutant cerebrocortical neuroepithelia exhibited faulty proliferation, aberrant neurogenesis, massive apoptosis, and scant H4K16 propionylation. Mutant NSPCs formed poor neurospheres, and pharmacological KAT8 inhibition abolished neurosphere formation. Moreover, we describe KAT8 variants in 9 patients with intellectual disability, seizures, autism, dysmorphisms, and other anomalies. The variants altered chromobarrel and catalytic domains of KAT8, thereby impairing nucleosomal H4K16 acetylation. Valproate was effective for treating epilepsy in at least 2 of the individuals. This study uncovers a critical role of KAT8 in cerebral and NSPC development, identifies 9 individuals with KAT8 variants, and links deficient H4K16 acylation directly to intellectual disability, epilepsy, and other developmental anomalies.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1172/JCI131145DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7269600PMC
March 2020

Rare SUZ12 variants commonly cause an overgrowth phenotype.

Am J Med Genet C Semin Med Genet 2019 12 17;181(4):532-547. Epub 2019 Nov 17.

Department of Medical Genetics, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.

The Polycomb repressive complex 2 is an epigenetic writer and recruiter with a role in transcriptional silencing. Constitutional pathogenic variants in its component proteins have been found to cause two established overgrowth syndromes: Weaver syndrome (EZH2-related overgrowth) and Cohen-Gibson syndrome (EED-related overgrowth). Imagawa et al. (2017) initially reported a singleton female with a Weaver-like phenotype with a rare coding SUZ12 variant-the same group subsequently reported two additional affected patients. Here we describe a further 10 patients (from nine families) with rare heterozygous SUZ12 variants who present with a Weaver-like phenotype. We report four frameshift, two missense, one nonsense, and two splice site variants. The affected patients demonstrate variable pre- and postnatal overgrowth, dysmorphic features, musculoskeletal abnormalities and developmental delay/intellectual disability. Some patients have genitourinary and structural brain abnormalities, and there may be an association with respiratory issues. The addition of these 10 patients makes a compelling argument that rare pathogenic SUZ12 variants frequently cause overgrowth, physical abnormalities, and abnormal neurodevelopmental outcomes in the heterozygous state. Pathogenic SUZ12 variants may be de novo or inherited, and are sometimes inherited from a mildly-affected parent. Larger samples sizes will be needed to elucidate whether one or more clinically-recognizable syndromes emerge from different variant subtypes.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ajmg.c.31748DOI Listing
December 2019

Widening of the genetic and clinical spectrum of Lamb-Shaffer syndrome, a neurodevelopmental disorder due to SOX5 haploinsufficiency.

Genet Med 2020 03 3;22(3):524-537. Epub 2019 Oct 3.

CHU de Rennes, service de génétique clinique, Rennes, France.

Purpose: Lamb-Shaffer syndrome (LAMSHF) is a neurodevelopmental disorder described in just over two dozen patients with heterozygous genetic alterations involving SOX5, a gene encoding a transcription factor regulating cell fate and differentiation in neurogenesis and other discrete developmental processes. The genetic alterations described so far are mainly microdeletions. The present study was aimed at increasing our understanding of LAMSHF, its clinical and genetic spectrum, and the pathophysiological mechanisms involved.

Methods: Clinical and genetic data were collected through GeneMatcher and clinical or genetic networks for 41 novel patients harboring various types ofSOX5 alterations. Functional consequences of selected substitutions were investigated.

Results: Microdeletions and truncating variants occurred throughout SOX5. In contrast, most missense variants clustered in the pivotal SOX-specific high-mobility-group domain. The latter variants prevented SOX5 from binding DNA and promoting transactivation in vitro, whereas missense variants located outside the high-mobility-group domain did not. Clinical manifestations and severity varied among patients. No clear genotype-phenotype correlations were found, except that missense variants outside the high-mobility-group domain were generally better tolerated.

Conclusions: This study extends the clinical and genetic spectrum associated with LAMSHF and consolidates evidence that SOX5 haploinsufficiency leads to variable degrees of intellectual disability, language delay, and other clinical features.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41436-019-0657-0DOI Listing
March 2020

Pathogenic WDFY3 variants cause neurodevelopmental disorders and opposing effects on brain size.

Brain 2019 09;142(9):2617-2630

GeneDx, Clinical Genomics, 207 Perry Parkway Gaithersburg, MD, USA.

The underpinnings of mild to moderate neurodevelopmental delay remain elusive, often leading to late diagnosis and interventions. Here, we present data on exome and genome sequencing as well as array analysis of 13 individuals that point to pathogenic, heterozygous, mostly de novo variants in WDFY3 (significant de novo enrichment P = 0.003) as a monogenic cause of mild and non-specific neurodevelopmental delay. Nine variants were protein-truncating and four missense. Overlapping symptoms included neurodevelopmental delay, intellectual disability, macrocephaly, and psychiatric disorders (autism spectrum disorders/attention deficit hyperactivity disorder). One proband presented with an opposing phenotype of microcephaly and the only missense-variant located in the PH-domain of WDFY3. Findings of this case are supported by previously published data, demonstrating that pathogenic PH-domain variants can lead to microcephaly via canonical Wnt-pathway upregulation. In a separate study, we reported that the autophagy scaffolding protein WDFY3 is required for cerebral cortical size regulation in mice, by controlling proper division of neural progenitors. Here, we show that proliferating cortical neural progenitors of human embryonic brains highly express WDFY3, further supporting a role for this molecule in the regulation of prenatal neurogenesis. We present data on Wnt-pathway dysregulation in Wdfy3-haploinsufficient mice, which display macrocephaly and deficits in motor coordination and associative learning, recapitulating the human phenotype. Consequently, we propose that in humans WDFY3 loss-of-function variants lead to macrocephaly via downregulation of the Wnt pathway. In summary, we present WDFY3 as a novel gene linked to mild to moderate neurodevelopmental delay and intellectual disability and conclude that variants putatively causing haploinsufficiency lead to macrocephaly, while an opposing pathomechanism due to variants in the PH-domain of WDFY3 leads to microcephaly.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/brain/awz198DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6736092PMC
September 2019

Expansion of the Primrose syndrome phenotype through the comparative analysis of two new case reports with ZBTB20 variants.

Am J Med Genet A 2019 11 18;179(11):2228-2232. Epub 2019 Jul 18.

Keizo Asami Laboratory, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Recife, Brazil.

Primrose syndrome (PRIMS), a rare genetic disorder with several clinical findings including intellectual disability, macrocephaly, typical facial features, and muscle wasting, is caused by heterozygous variants in the ZBTB20 gene. We report the cases of two males diagnosed with PRIMS at different ages, emphasizing the likely progressive nature of the disorder, as well as the differences and similarities of presentation during infancy and adulthood. Patient 1 is a 2-year-old American male with a medical history marked by impaired hearing, developmental delays, and fainting spells. Patient 2 is a 28-year-old Brazilian male, who presents with a phenotype similar to that seen in Patient 1 with additional features of ectopic calcifications and prominent muscular and skeletal abnormalities. Additionally, Patient 2 has a history of fainting spells and diminished body height and weight, with the latter features having only been reported in one PRIMS patient so far. Both Patients 1 and 2 were found to carry heterozygous likely pathogenic missense variants, detected in the last coding exon of ZBTB20 (c.1822T>C, p.Cys608Arg, de novo, and c.1873A>G, p.Met625Val, respectively), consistent with PRIMS. Overall, these case reports highlight PRIMS's likely progressive nature and contribute to the understanding of the natural history of this condition.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ajmg.a.61297DOI Listing
November 2019

Variants in DOCK3 cause developmental delay and hypotonia.

Eur J Hum Genet 2019 08 11;27(8):1225-1234. Epub 2019 Apr 11.

Division of Genetics and Genomic Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, USA.

The DOCK3 gene encodes the Dedicator of cytokinesis 3 (DOCK3) protein, which belongs to the family of guanine nucleotide exchange factors and is expressed almost exclusively in the brain and spinal cord. We used whole exome sequencing (WES) to investigate the molecular cause of developmental delay and hypotonia in three unrelated probands. WES identified truncating and splice site variants in Patient 1 and compound heterozygous and homozygous missense variants in Patients 2 and 3, respectively. We studied the effect of the three missense variants in vitro by using site-directed mutagenesis and pull-down assay and show that the induction of Rac1 activation was significantly lower in DOCK3 mutant cells compared with wild type human DOCK3 (P < 0.05). We generated a protein model to further examine the effect of the two missense variants within or adjacent to the DHR-2 domain in DOCK3 and this model supports pathogenicity. Our results support a loss of function mechanism but the data on the patients with missense variants should be cautiously interpreted because of the variability of the phenotypes and limited number of cases. Prior studies have described DOCK3 bi-allelic loss of function variants in two families with ataxia, hypotonia, and developmental delay. Here, we report on three patients with DOCK3-related developmental delay, wide-based or uncoordinated gait, and hypotonia, further supporting DOCK3's role in a neurodevelopmental syndrome and expanding the spectrum of phenotypic and genotypic variability.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41431-019-0397-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6777627PMC
August 2019

Biallelic pathogenic variants in the lanosterol synthase gene LSS involved in the cholesterol biosynthesis cause alopecia with intellectual disability, a rare recessive neuroectodermal syndrome.

Genet Med 2019 09 6;21(9):2025-2035. Epub 2019 Feb 6.

Centre de Genetique et Centre de Reference Anomalies du Développement et Syndromes Malformatifs de l'Est, FHU-TRANSLAD, CHU Dijon, Dijon, France.

Purpose: Lanosterol synthase (LSS) gene was initially described in families with extensive congenital cataracts. Recently, a study has highlighted LSS associated with hypotrichosis simplex. We expanded the phenotypic spectrum of LSS to a recessive neuroectodermal syndrome formerly named alopecia with mental retardation (APMR) syndrome. It is a rare autosomal recessive condition characterized by hypotrichosis and intellectual disability (ID) or developmental delay (DD), frequently associated with early-onset epilepsy and other dermatological features.

Methods: Through a multicenter international collaborative study, we identified LSS pathogenic variants in APMR individuals either by exome sequencing or LSS Sanger sequencing. Splicing defects were assessed by transcript analysis and minigene assay.

Results: We reported ten APMR individuals from six unrelated families with biallelic variants in LSS. We additionally identified one affected individual with a single rare variant in LSS and an allelic imbalance suggesting a second event. Among the identified variants, two were truncating, seven were missense, and two were splicing variants. Quantification of cholesterol and its precursors did not reveal noticeable imbalance.

Conclusion: In the cholesterol biosynthesis pathway, lanosterol synthase leads to the cyclization of (S)-2,3-oxidosqualene into lanosterol. Our data suggest LSS as a major gene causing a rare recessive neuroectodermal syndrome.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41436-019-0445-xDOI Listing
September 2019

De novo variants in FBXO11 cause a syndromic form of intellectual disability with behavioral problems and dysmorphisms.

Eur J Hum Genet 2019 05 24;27(5):738-746. Epub 2019 Jan 24.

Department of Human Genetics, Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour, Radboud University Medical Center, P.O. Box 9101, 6500 HB, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.

Determining pathogenicity of genomic variation identified by next-generation sequencing techniques can be supported by recurrent disruptive variants in the same gene in phenotypically similar individuals. However, interpretation of novel variants in a specific gene in individuals with mild-moderate intellectual disability (ID) without recognizable syndromic features can be challenging and reverse phenotyping is often required. We describe 24 individuals with a de novo disease-causing variant in, or partial deletion of, the F-box only protein 11 gene (FBXO11, also known as VIT1 and PRMT9). FBXO11 is part of the SCF (SKP1-cullin-F-box) complex, a multi-protein E3 ubiquitin-ligase complex catalyzing the ubiquitination of proteins destined for proteasomal degradation. Twenty-two variants were identified by next-generation sequencing, comprising 2 in-frame deletions, 11 missense variants, 1 canonical splice site variant, and 8 nonsense or frameshift variants leading to a truncated protein or degraded transcript. The remaining two variants were identified by array-comparative genomic hybridization and consisted of a partial deletion of FBXO11. All individuals had borderline to severe ID and behavioral problems (autism spectrum disorder, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, anxiety, aggression) were observed in most of them. The most relevant common facial features included a thin upper lip and a broad prominent space between the paramedian peaks of the upper lip. Other features were hypotonia and hyperlaxity of the joints. We show that de novo variants in FBXO11 cause a syndromic form of ID. The current series show the power of reverse phenotyping in the interpretation of novel genetic variances in individuals who initially did not appear to have a clear recognizable phenotype.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41431-018-0292-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6462006PMC
May 2019

ZMIZ1 Variants Cause a Syndromic Neurodevelopmental Disorder.

Am J Hum Genet 2019 02 10;104(2):319-330. Epub 2019 Jan 10.

Cook Children's Medical Center, Fort Worth, TX 76102, USA.

ZMIZ1 is a coactivator of several transcription factors, including p53, the androgen receptor, and NOTCH1. Here, we report 19 subjects with intellectual disability and developmental delay carrying variants in ZMIZ1. The associated features include growth failure, feeding difficulties, microcephaly, facial dysmorphism, and various other congenital malformations. Of these 19, 14 unrelated subjects carried de novo heterozygous single-nucleotide variants (SNVs) or single-base insertions/deletions, 3 siblings harbored a heterozygous single-base insertion, and 2 subjects had a balanced translocation disrupting ZMIZ1 or involving a regulatory region of ZMIZ1. In total, we identified 13 point mutations that affect key protein regions, including a SUMO acceptor site, a central disordered alanine-rich motif, a proline-rich domain, and a transactivation domain. All identified variants were absent from all available exome and genome databases. In vitro, ZMIZ1 showed impaired coactivation of the androgen receptor. In vivo, overexpression of ZMIZ1 mutant alleles in developing mouse brains using in utero electroporation resulted in abnormal pyramidal neuron morphology, polarization, and positioning, underscoring the importance of ZMIZ1 in neural development and supporting mutations in ZMIZ1 as the cause of a rare neurodevelopmental syndrome.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ajhg.2018.12.007DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6369415PMC
February 2019

Biallelic sequence variants in INTS1 in patients with developmental delays, cataracts, and craniofacial anomalies.

Eur J Hum Genet 2019 Apr 8;27(4):582-593. Epub 2019 Jan 8.

Dept. Pediatrics, Division of Genetics, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, 94143-2711, USA.

The Integrator complex subunit 1 (INTS1) is a component of the integrator complex that comprises 14 subunits and associates with RPB1 to catalyze endonucleolytic cleavage of nascent snRNAs and assist RNA polymerase II in promoter-proximal pause-release on protein-coding genes. We present five patients, including two sib pairs, with biallelic sequence variants in INTS1. The patients manifested absent or severely limited speech, an abnormal gait, hypotonia and cataracts. Exome sequencing revealed biallelic variants in INTS1 in all patients. One sib pair demonstrated a missense variant, p.(Arg77Cys), and a frameshift variant, p.(Arg1800Profs*20), another sib pair had a homozygous missense variant, p.(Pro1874Leu), and the fifth patient had a frameshift variant, p.(Leu1764Cysfs*16) and a missense variant, p.(Leu2164Pro). We also report additional clinical data on three previously described individuals with a homozygous, loss of function variant, p.(Ser1784*) in INTS1 that shared cognitive delays, cataracts and dysmorphic features with these patients. Several of the variants affected the protein C-terminus and preliminary modeling showed that the p.(Pro1874Leu) and p.(Leu2164Pro) variants may interfere with INTS1 helix folding. In view of the cataracts observed, we performed in-situ hybridization and demonstrated expression of ints1 in the zebrafish eye. We used Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR)/Cas9 to make larvae with biallelic insertion/deletion (indel) variants in ints1. The mutant larvae developed typically through gastrulation, but sections of the eye showed abnormal lens development. The distinctive phenotype associated with biallelic variants in INTS1 points to dysfunction of the integrator complex as a mechanism for intellectual disability, eye defects and craniofacial anomalies.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41431-018-0298-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6460580PMC
April 2019

CHD3 helicase domain mutations cause a neurodevelopmental syndrome with macrocephaly and impaired speech and language.

Nat Commun 2018 11 5;9(1):4619. Epub 2018 Nov 5.

AP-HP, Hôpital de la Pitié-Salpêtrière, Département de Génétique, Paris, 75013, France.

Chromatin remodeling is of crucial importance during brain development. Pathogenic alterations of several chromatin remodeling ATPases have been implicated in neurodevelopmental disorders. We describe an index case with a de novo missense mutation in CHD3, identified during whole genome sequencing of a cohort of children with rare speech disorders. To gain a comprehensive view of features associated with disruption of this gene, we use a genotype-driven approach, collecting and characterizing 35 individuals with de novo CHD3 mutations and overlapping phenotypes. Most mutations cluster within the ATPase/helicase domain of the encoded protein. Modeling their impact on the three-dimensional structure demonstrates disturbance of critical binding and interaction motifs. Experimental assays with six of the identified mutations show that a subset directly affects ATPase activity, and all but one yield alterations in chromatin remodeling. We implicate de novo CHD3 mutations in a syndrome characterized by intellectual disability, macrocephaly, and impaired speech and language.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41467-018-06014-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6218476PMC
November 2018
-->