Publications by authors named "Rezvan Ashouri"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Florid cemento-osseous dysplasia mimicking apical periodontitis: A case report.

Aust Endod J 2013 Dec 22;39(3):176-9. Epub 2011 Aug 22.

Private Practice, Tehran, Iran Endodontic Department, Shahed Dental School, Tehran, Iran Oral and Dental Diseases Research Center, Kerman University of Medical Sciences, Kerman, Iran School of Dentistry, University of Western Australia, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.

Cemento-osseous dysplasia may present as a focal, periapical or florid lesion in the mandible or maxilla. The lesion may sometimes appear similar to peri-radicular lesions on a periapical radiograph. This report presents a case with irreversible pulpitis and root resorption as well as a mixed radiolucent/radiopaque lesion around a mandibular molar tooth root. Root canal treatment was performed and because of the radiographic signs of root resorption and the patient's fear of having a malignant disease, periapical surgery was also performed. The histopathology report confirmed the presence of florid cement-osseous dysplasia which was mimicking apical periodontitis. Follow-up radiography 12 months after the surgery illustrated complete healing of the radiolucent area.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1747-4477.2011.00325.xDOI Listing
December 2013

Effect of occlusal reduction on postoperative pain in teeth with irreversible pulpitis and mild tenderness to percussion.

J Endod 2013 Jan 29;39(1):1-5. Epub 2012 Sep 29.

Oral and Dental Diseases Research Center, School of Dentistry, Kerman University of Medical Sciences, Kerman, Iran.

Introduction: Pain management after root canal treatment is a very important issue in clinical practice. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of occlusal reduction on postoperative pain in teeth with irreversible pulpitis and tenderness to percussion.

Methods: Fifty-four posterior vital teeth with sensitivity to percussion requiring endodontic treatment were included in this study. After administration of local anesthesia, the root canals were instrumented, and an intracanal calcium hydroxide dressing was placed. The patients were randomly divided into 2 groups of 27 each. In 1 group the occlusal surface was reduced (OR group), whereas in the other group the occlusal surface was not modified (no occlusal reduction, NOR group). Each patient was asked to record their postoperative pain on a visual analogue scale with 4 categories at 6 hours, 12 hours, 18 hours, 1 day, and then daily for 6 days after this treatment. Data were analyzed by t test, Cochran Q, χ(2), and Mann-Whitney tests.

Results: Forty-six patients returned the visual analogue scale forms. There was no significant difference in postoperative pain between the 2 groups (P > .05) after root canal preparation and calcium hydroxide dressing.

Conclusions: Occlusal surface reduction did not provide any further reduction in postoperative pain for teeth with irreversible pulpitis and mild tenderness to percussion compared with no occlusal reduction.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.joen.2012.08.008DOI Listing
January 2013

Surgical intervention for treating an extensive internal resorption with unfavorable crown-to-root ratio.

J Conserv Dent 2012 Oct;15(4):388-91

Private practice, Tehra, Iran.

Internal resorption is a rare lesion in permanent teeth. Managing perforating internal resorption is a great challenge for dentists. This report presents a successful surgical treatment of a maxillary central incisor that had extensive root perforation due to internal resorption. After unsuccessful nonsurgical approach, during surgical intervention apical part of the resorption defect was removed and the coronal part was filled with mineral trioxide aggregate. Three years later the tooth was symptom free with normal mobility and pocket depth despite unfavorable crown-to-root ratio. This case report have shown that surgical intervention and using mineral trioxide aggregate as root canal filling material in a tooth with extensive internal resorption and unfavorable crown-to-root ratio can be considered as a treatment option.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/0972-0707.101922DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3482756PMC
October 2012

The effect of premedication with ibuprofen and indomethacin on the success of inferior alveolar nerve block for teeth with irreversible pulpitis.

J Endod 2010 Sep 3;36(9):1450-4. Epub 2010 Jul 3.

Oral and Dental Research Center, Kerman University of Medical Sciences, Kerman, Iran.

Introduction: Achieving pulp anesthesia with irreversible pulpitis is difficult. This study evaluated whether nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs assist local anesthesia.

Methods: In a randomized double-blinded clinical trial, 150 patients (50 per group) with irreversible pulpitis were given placebo, 600 mg ibuprofen, or 75 mg indomethacin 1 hour before local anesthesia. Each patient recorded their pain score on a visual analog scale before taking the medication, 15 minutes after anesthesia in response to a cold test, during access cavity preparation and during root canal instrumentation. No or mild pain at any stage was considered a success. Data were analyzed by the chi-square and analysis of variance tests.

Results: Overall success rates for placebo, ibuprofen, and indomethacin were 32%, 78%, and 62%, respectively (p < 0.001). Ibuprofen and indomethacin were significantly better than placebo (p < 0.01). There was no difference between ibuprofen and indomethacin (p = 0.24).

Conclusions: Premedication with ibuprofen and indomethacin significantly increased the success rates of inferior alveolar nerve block anesthesia for teeth with irreversible pulpitis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.joen.2010.05.007DOI Listing
September 2010
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