Publications by authors named "Reza Adl Tabatabai"

3 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Evaluation of Acquired HIV Drug Resistance among People Living with HIV Who Have Taken Antiretroviral Therapy for 9-15 Months in 14 Triangular Clinics in Iran, 2015-2016.

Intervirology 2018 12;61(6):292-300. Epub 2019 Mar 12.

Iranian Research Center for HIV/AIDS, Iranian Institute for Reduction of High-Risk Behaviors, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.

Aims: The aim of this study was to evaluate drug resistance patterns among Iranian people living with HIV who have taken antiretroviral therapy for 9-15 months.

Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted between December 2015 and May 2016. Two hundred fifty-two blood samples were collected from all eligible HIV-infected patients at fourteen healthcare settings, located in major provinces in Iran. The samples were examined for presence of drug resistance strains and viral load level. Moreover, a phylogenetic tree, using neighbor joining, was constructed and HIV subtypes were determined.

Results: The most common subtypes were CRF35-AD (47.6%) and A1 (42.8%), followed by 45_CPX (4.8%) and C (4.8%). The resistance to non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs), nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs), and protease inhibitors was reported as 19.2, 19.2, and 10.3%, respectively. M184I/V mutation was the most frequent (31.6%) mutation among NRTI-based regimens. Moreover, K103E/N was the most frequent (34.2%) NNRTI mutation.

Conclusions: This is the first study to illuminate the emergence of the CPX genotype among Iranian patients. The drug resistance rate of NNRTIs was similar to that of NRTIs. By assessing drug resistance, it is possible to evaluate the efficacy of treatment and patient adherence to treatment.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000497036DOI Listing
September 2019

HIV-1 Drug Resistance Profiles for the HIV Protease and Reverse Transcriptase Gene in Patients Receiving Combination Therapy in Tehran, Iran.

Infect Disord Drug Targets 2018 ;18(3):241-248

Iranian Research Center for HIV/AIDS, Iranian Institute for Reduction of High-Risk Behaviors, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.

Background: Determination of the drug-resistant mutations has a crucial role in the management of HIV-1 infected patients.

Objective: The aim of the current study was to evaluate drug resistance profile of Reverse transcriptase and Proteasegenes, and to find the correlation between drug resistance mutations and ART regimen to intensifyphysicians'options for the most effective therapy which could also influence the establishment of health-related policies at the national level in Iran.

Method: HIV-1 RNA of 34 samples was extracted from plasma and RT Nested- PCR was performed and the final products were sequenced. Stanford HIV drug resistance sequence database was used for interpretation of the data.

Results: In 14 patients out of 15, the following mutations were observed; Nucleoside RT Inhibitor (NRTI)-Resistance Mutations with the prevalence of 11 patients having this mutation at codon 184 (73%) and Non-Nucleoside RT Inhibitor (NNRTI)-Resistance Mutations with the prevalence of 8 patients having NNRTI mutations at codon 103(53%).In 17 patients, major Protease Inhibitor (PI) Resistance Mutations were found out in 2 (12%) of them while the minor PI was found in7 (41%) patients.

Conclusion: An antiretroviral treatment consisting of nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor, non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor and protease inhibitor, impairs the emergence of a resistant strain and descends its prevalence among the community. Having a high rate mutation in participants of this study raises concerns about treatment failure in HIV infected people in Iran. Observing high mutations rates in participants of this study raises concerns about treatment failure in HIV infected people in Iran.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.2174/1871526518666180416110259DOI Listing
January 2019

Different Degrees of Immune Recovery Using Antiretroviral Regimens with Vonavir or Zidovudine/Lamivudine/Efavirenz in HIVPositive Patients Receiving First Line Treatment in Iran.

Infect Disord Drug Targets 2018 ;18(3):207-213

Iranian Research Center for HIV/AIDS, Iranian Institute for Reduction of High-Risk Behaviors, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.

Background: The initial antiretroviral therapy (ART) regimens recommended by most national treatment guidelines in resource-limited settings consist of two Nucleoside Reverse-Transcriptase Inhibitors (NRTIs) and one Non-Nucleoside Reverse- Transcriptase Inhibitor (NNRTI). The NRTIs are Zidovudine (AZT) or Stavudine (d4T) with Lamivudine (3TC); the NNRTI components are either Nevirapine (NVP) or Efavirenz (EFV). Existing data regarding the effectiveness of Vonavir compared to other first-line ART regimens in increasing CD4+ T cell counts are unsatisfactory.

Methods: Immunological outcomes of 134 individuals who were on initial stage of antiretroviral therapy with Vonavir or a combination of Zidovudine/Lamivudine and Efavirenz were analyzed. The immunological response was then assessed during 28 weeks.

Results: Both groups demonstrated a significant increase in their CD4+ T cell count which was greater in Zidovudine/Lamivudine and Efavirenz treated group. We observed a noticeable increase in CD4+ T cells rates in the first three months of therapy; however, our results indicated a greater increase of cell counts in individuals with baseline CD4 lower than 100 cells/mm3 treated with Vonavir in first 12 weeks of treatment compared to those with higher baseline CD4.

Conclusion: A rapid CD4+ Tcell increase occurred shortly after beginning ART consisting either Vonavir or combination of Zidovudine, Lamivudine and Efavirenz. Late increases in CD4+ T cell counts were more pronounced in therapy using Zidovudine/ Lamivudine and Efavirenz.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.2174/1871526518666180108104031DOI Listing
January 2019