Publications by authors named "Reta Tsegaye"

18 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Survival from a Triple Co-Infection of COVID-19, HIV, and Tuberculosis: A Case Report.

Int Med Case Rep J 2021 2;14:611-615. Epub 2021 Sep 2.

School of Medicine, Institute of Health Sciences, Wollega University, Nekemte, Ethiopia.

Introduction: The triple burden of COVID-19, human immune virus (HIV), and TB co-infection is one of the contemporary challenges to this globe. People living with chronic medical diseases such as HIV and TB are more likely to experience poor outcomes from COVID-19. This study aimed to report survival from triple co-infection with PTB, HIV, and COVID-19 in Wollega University referral hospital (WURH), western Ethiopia.

Case Presentation: A 55-year-old male known HIV patient on HAART for the last 3 years presented to WURH on May 26, 2021, with chief complaints of shortness of breath of 5 days' duration associated with productive cough, history of high-grade fever, and severe headache. He had produced a lot of bloody sputum one month prior to the current complaints. On 1st day of his presentation, a Gene Expert test was done from sputum, and he was positive for pulmonary TB. On the same day, a nasopharyngeal sample for COVID-19 using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was positive. On his 2nd day of admission, he was transferred to the COVID-19 treatment center with the diagnosis of severe COVID-19, PTB, and WHO stage-3 RVI. During his stay in the hospital, he was provided with oxygen via a nasal cannula. Intensive phase anti-TB treatment was initiated on the 3rd day of admission. HAART was continued with the same regimen he was taking prior to his presentation. On June 6, 2021, the patient was recovered and discharged from the hospital after 10 days of hospital stay.

Conclusion: This case report suggests, after 10 days of admission with triple infections, there is a good clinical prognosis and survival from COVID-19. On admission, further diagnosis and investigations of TB co-infection should be performed for all patients admitted with COVID-19 due to their similar and non-specific clinical manifestations.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/IMCRJ.S326383DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8421329PMC
September 2021

Knowledge, Attitude and Practice Toward Corona virus Infection Among Pregnant Women Attending Antenatal Care at Public Hospitals in Three Wollega Zones, Ethiopia.

Int J Gen Med 2021 15;14:3563-3573. Epub 2021 Jul 15.

Departments of Pediatrics and Neonatology Nursing, School of Nursing and Midwifery, Wollega University, Nekemte, Ethiopia.

Background: Pregnancy is an immune-suppressed state which makes pregnant women generally more susceptible to COVID-19 infection and severe illness. Extensive precautions have been recommended to avoid exposure to the virus. Knowledge and attitude toward the disease play an integral role in readiness to accept public health measures. This study aimed to assess the knowledge, attitude and practice towards COVID-19 among pregnant women attending antenatal clinics in three Wollega zones, Ethiopia.

Methods: Institution-based cross-sectional study was employed among 415 pregnant women attending antenatal care at public hospitals in three Wollega zones, Ethiopia from July to August 2020. The data were collected using an interviewer-administered structured questionnaire. The level of knowledge was assessed using 12 multiple choice questions; the score of above or equal to mean was considered as adequate knowledge. Binary logistic regression was performed and the adjusted odds ratio with P-value ≤0.05 at 95% CI was taken as statistically significant.

Results: This study indicates that more than two-thirds (75.4%; 95% CI: 71.1-79.3%) and 43.6% of the pregnant women had adequate knowledge and good practice about the coronavirus pandemic, respectively. The pregnant women who attended secondary school and above and were urban residents were more likely to have good knowledge, AOR = 2.99 (1.7-5.0) and 1.6 (1.2-2.7), respectively. Maternal age ≤ 25 yearsand being an urban resident were the two predictors of good practice of preventive measures, AOR = 1.7 (1.2-2.6) and 2.3 (1.3-4.0), respectively.

Conclusions And Recommendations: The target population demonstrated acceptable knowledge and poor practice toward COVID-19. Health-care providers should give more attention to educating pregnant women at any point of contact; legal enforcement should be implemented to improve practice of preventive measures. Special consideration should be given to those who are from rural areas, and to less-educated pregnant women.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/IJGM.S295490DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8289464PMC
July 2021

Predictors of preterm birth in Western Ethiopia: A case control study.

PLoS One 2021 7;16(4):e0247927. Epub 2021 Apr 7.

School of Medicine, Institute of Health sciences,Wollega University, Nekemte, Ethiopia.

Background: Early neonatal death caused by preterm birth contributes the most for perinatal death. The prevalence of preterm birth continues to rise and is a significant public health problem. The exact cause of preterm birth is yet unanswered, as mostly preterm birth happens spontaneously. Predictors of preterm birth in developing countries like Ethiopia were not well investigated, and no study was conducted before this in the study area.

Objectives: To identify predictors of preterm birth in Western Ethiopia, 2017/2018.

Methods: Health facility-based unmatched case-control study was conducted from October 20/2017-march 20/2018 in 4 Hospitals. A total sample size of 358 women was recruited. From this 72 were cases and 286 were controls. Cases were mothers who gave Preterm birth, and controls were mothers who gave birth at term. Ethical clearance was obtained from Wollega University ethical review committee. A pre tested, structured questionnaire was used to collect data. Data entry and analysis was done using Epi Data 3.1 and SPSS version 21, respectively. Logistic regression was done to identify predictors of preterm birth.

Result: Three hundred fifty-eight women participated in this study of which 72 were cases and 286 were controls; making the overall response rate of 100%. Lack of antenatal care visit [AOR = 3.18, 95% CI 1.37-7.38]),(Having 1-2 antenatal care visit [AOR = 2.27, 95% CI 1.18-4.35]),history of previous preterm)[AOR = 5.19, 95% CI1.29-20.88],Short Interpregnancy Interval [AOR = 4.41.95% CI 2.05-9.47],Having Reproductive tract infections [AOR = 2.54, 95% CI 1.02-6.32] and having Obstetric complications [AOR = 2.48,95% CI 1.31-4.71] were found to be predictors of preterm birth.

Conclusion And Recommendation: Risk factors of preterm delivery are multifactorial and depend on geographical and demographic features of the population studied. Hence results of studies from one area might not be applicable to another area. Antenatal care visits are unique opportunities for early diagnosis and treatment of problems. Therefore, antenatal care should be strengthened, and appropriate counseling should be given at each antenatal care follow up. Maintainning optimum birth interval through family planning, and early identification and treatment of reproductive tract infections are mandatory.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0247927PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8026033PMC
September 2021

HIV serostatus disclosure and associated factors among HIV positive pregnant and lactating women at Nekemte public health facilities, western Ethiopia.

PLoS One 2021 19;16(3):e0248278. Epub 2021 Mar 19.

School of Nursing and Midwifery, Institutes of Health Sciences, Wollega University, Nekemte, Ethiopia.

Background: Disclosure of Human Immune Virus (HIV) serostatus by pregnant and lactating women is crucial for the successful prevention of mother to child transmission of HIV/AIDS. However, little has been studied regarding the prevalence and factors associated with HIV status disclosure among HIV positive pregnant and lactating women in Ethiopia.

Methods: An institution-based cross-sectional study was conducted in the Nekemte Public Health facilities among 380 pregnant and lactating women enrolled in universal antiretroviral therapy (ART) treatment from January 2015-December, 2019. The data were collected by using a checklist, developed from Prevention of Mother to Child Transmission (PMTCT) logbook, ART intake forms, and medical cards of the patients. Epidata version 3.2 was used for data entry, and then the data were exported to STATA version 14 for further analysis. The binary logistic regression model was employed to determine factors associated with the disclosure status among HIV positive pregnant and lactating women. Adjusted Odds Ratio (AOR) with 95% confidence intervals was computed and statistical significance was declared when it is significant at a 5% level (p-value < 0.05).

Results: A total of 380 women have participated in the study. Two hundred seventy-six (73.4%) of women had disclosed their HIV status to at least one individual. The study found living in urban (OR = 1.83, 95% CI: 1.04, 3.20), married women (OR = 4.16, 95% CI: 1.87, 9.24), higher educational status (OR = 2.35, 95% CI: 1.31, 5.51), positive HIV status of partner (OR = 2.35, 95%CI: 1.17, 4.70), and being multipara (OR = 4.94, 95% CI: 2.29, 10.66) were independent determinants of HIV status disclosure.

Conclusions: HIV status disclosure among pregnant and lactating women in the study area was sub-optimal. Empowering women through education, encouraging partners for HIV testing, and enhancing active male involvement in HIV treatment and control programs should get due attention.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0248278PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7978369PMC
March 2021

The knowledge and practice towards COVID-19 pandemic prevention among residents of Ethiopia. An online cross-sectional study.

PLoS One 2021 28;16(1):e0234585. Epub 2021 Jan 28.

Department of Statistics, College of Natural and Computational Sciences, Dire Dawa University, Dire Dawa, Ethiopia.

Background: The disease from the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) has been considered as an international concern and a pandemic starting from the declaration of the World Health Organization (WHO) as an outbreak disease.

Objective: The objective of this study is to assess the prevention of knowledge and practices towards the COVID-19 pandemic among the residents of Ethiopia.

Methods: An online cross-sectional study was conducted among a sample of Ethiopian residents via social platforms of the author's network with popular social media such as Facebook, Telegram, and email. The snowball sampling was employed to recruit participants. In doing so, we collected the responses of 341 participants successfully from April 15 to 22, 2020. The collected data were analyzed by STATA version 14 software and descriptive statistics were employed to summarize the knowledge and practices of the community towards the COVID-19 pandemic.

Results: The majority of respondents 80.5% were male. About 91.2% of the participants heard about the COVID-19 pandemic. Moreover, out of 341 participants 90.0%, 93.8% of them knew that the COVID-19 pandemic was prevented by maintaining social distance and frequent handwashing, respectively. This shows that the prevention knowledge of the participants towards the COVID-19 by maintaining social distance and frequent handwashing was high. However, out of 341 participants only 61%,84% of them practiced social distance and frequent handwashing toward COVID-19, respectively.

Conclusions: The majority of the participants knew the ways to protect themselves from the novel coronavirus (COVID-19), but there was a great problem of changing this prevention knowledge to practices. This shows that there is an action gap between having prevention knowledge of the COVID-19 and implementing it into practices to tackle the spread of the COVID-19 among communities. Therefore, the concerned body should be focused on providing awareness and education for the community regarding the implementation of prevention knowledge to practices.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0234585PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7843015PMC
February 2021

Postpartum modern contraception utilization and its determinants in Ethiopia: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

PLoS One 2020 14;15(12):e0243776. Epub 2020 Dec 14.

School of Nursing and Midwifery, Institutes of Health Sciences, Wollega University, Nekemte, Ethiopia.

Background: Contraceptive use is the best and most cost-effective strategy to reduce feto-maternal adverse effects of short birth intervals. More than two-thirds of women in developing countries who do not want to conceive are not using contraception methods. Although there were various primary studies in different parts of the country, there is no nationally representative evidence on postpartum modern contraception utilization and its determinants in Ethiopia.

Objective: This review was aimed to determine the best available pieces of evidence to pool the magnitude of postpartum modern contraception utilization and find out its determinants.

Methods: Published studies were extensively searched by using electronic databases and unpublished studies were identified from the digital library. All observational studies conducted on the magnitude of postpartum modern contraception utilization and its determinants in Ethiopia were included. Data were extracted on the Microsoft Excel spreadsheet and analyzed using STATA 14.1 version. A random-effects model was used to estimate the pooled magnitude of postpartum modern contraception utilization with a 95% confidence interval (CI). Inverse variance (I2) was used to identify the presence of heterogeneity and forest plot was used to estimate the pooled magnitude of postpartum contraception utilization. The presence of publication bias was assessed by funnel plots and Egger's statistical tests. Sub-group analysis was computed to minimize underlying heterogeneity.

Findings: In this review, 19 primary studies were included. The pooled magnitude of postpartum modern contraception utilization in Ethiopia was 45.79% (95%CI 36.45%, 55.13%). The review found that having more than four Antenatal care visits(ANC), having postnatal care visit (PNC), having a formal education, history of family planning use, history of counseling on family planning, and having greater than four alive children as significant determinants of postpartum modern contraception utilization.

Conclusion: The magnitude of postpartum modern contraception utilization in Ethiopia was low. ANC visit, PNC visit, maternal educational status, history of previous family planning use, counseling on family planning, and number of alive children were found to be significant determinants of postpartum modern contraception utilization. Therefore, strengthening focused ANC and PNC services to encourage women in utilizing modern contraception during the postnatal period is needed.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0243776PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7735615PMC
February 2021

Fertility desire and associated factors among people living with HIV in Ethiopia: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

Arch Public Health 2020 Nov 23;78(1):123. Epub 2020 Nov 23.

Department of Public health, Institute of Health Sciences, Wollega University, Nekemte, Ethiopia.

Background: Increased Anti-Retroviral Therapy (ART) coverage improves health status and the survival of people living with Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) as a result, reproductive health needs of the clients are increased. As part of continuum HIV care, understanding fertility desire and reproductive health care needs of HIV positive peoples will play paramount role in planning and delivering appropriate health services. The finding of studies conducted on the fertility desire and associated factors among People Living with HIV in Ethiopia presented inconclusive. Therefore, this study aimed to assess the pooled prevalence of fertility desire and associated factors among people living with HIV in Ethiopia.

Methods: A total of 26 studies conducted in Ethiopia were included in this Meta-analysis. Pub Med, HINARI, Google scholar and Google data bases were searched. Data from the included articles were extracted using a standardized data extraction tool. The included studies were analyzed using a random effects meta-analysis model. Analysis was done Using STATA version 14 statistical software. Heterogeneity was assessed statistically using the standard Chi-square, I The association between fertility desire and factors were examined using a random effects model.

Result: In this meta-analysis, the pooled prevalence of fertility desire in Ethiopia is 42.21% (95%CI 39.18, 45.25). Fertility desire is significantly associated with sex: being female (OR = 0.71,95%CI 0.57,0.86), partners desire (OR = 16.8, 95% CI: 9.45, 29.88), not having child (OR = 5.46 95%CI 4.24, 7.040), age < 30(OR = 2.34, 95%CI 2.10, 2.60), formal education (OR = 1.31 95%CI 1.09, 1.59)). However, use of family planning, residence, and Knowledge on Prevention of Mother to Child Transmission and disclosure status didn't show association with fertility desire.

Conclusion: In this finding, significant people of living with HIV have a desire to have a child. The finding showed the need to strengthen fertility desire and reproductive health care needs of HIV positive peoples. Therefore, strengthening the integration of fertility related issues with HIV continuum care will play a paramount role in averting risky sexual behaviors and Prevention of Mother to Child Transmission among peoples on ART.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13690-020-00504-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7685622PMC
November 2020

The magnitude of adherence to option B plus program and associated factors among women in eastern African countries: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

BMC Public Health 2020 Nov 27;20(1):1812. Epub 2020 Nov 27.

Department of Public Health, Institute of Health Sciences, Wollega University, Nekemte, Ethiopia.

Background: Despite coverage and benefits associated with the prevention of mothers to child transmission (PMTCT) services, mothers' adherence to option B plus is still a challenge. Though few primary studies are available on the magnitude of adherence to option B plus and factors associated in Eastern African countries, they do not provide strong evidence in helping policymakers to address suboptimal adherence to option B plus. Therefore, this systematic review and meta-analysis was intended to estimate the pooled magnitude of adherence to option B plus program and associated factors among women in Eastern African countries.

Methods: PubMed, Medline, HINARI, Cochrane library, the Web of Science, and Google Scholar were searched for studies reported on the magnitude of adherence to option B plus among women in Eastern African countries. The search terms used were "option B plus", "magnitude", "prevalence", "PMTCT", "ART adherence", "associated factors", "all lists of Eastern African countries" and their combination by Boolean operators. The effect sizes of the meta-analysis were the magnitude of adherence to option B plus and the odds ratio of the associated factors. STATA/SE V14 was used for statistical analysis, and publication bias was assessed using funnel plots and Egger's test.

Results: Fourteen studies having total participants of 4883 were included in the systematic review and meta-analysis. Using the random effect model, the pooled prevalence of adherence to option B plus was 71.88% (95% CI: 58.54-85.23%). The factors associated with good adherence to option B plus PMTCT program were partner support (Adjusted odds ratio (AOR) = 4.13; 95% CI: 2.78-6.15), received counseling services (AOR = 4.12, 95% CI: 2.81-6.02), disclosure of HIV status to partner (AOR = 4.38; 95% CI: 1.79-10.70), and clinical stage of HIV/AIDS I/II (AOR = 2.62; 95% CI: 1.53-4.46).

Conclusion: The level of adherence to option B plus program in Eastern African countries was generally sub-optimal. Thus, a coordinated effort is needed to raise the number of mothers to be tested, and early treatment initiation for HIV positive mothers before the disease advances. Furthermore, counseling services for couples on the importance of early treatment initiation and adherence to medications must be given due attention.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12889-020-09903-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7693523PMC
November 2020

Knowledge and Attitude Towards Antimicrobial Resistance of Graduating Health Science Students of Wollega University.

Infect Drug Resist 2020 3;13:3937-3944. Epub 2020 Nov 3.

Department of Nursing, Institute of Health Sciences, Wollega University, Nekemte, Ethiopia.

Background: Antimicrobial resistance is a worldwide concern due to the inappropriate and irrational use of antibiotics. Thus, this study was aimed at determining the knowledge and attitude of graduating health science students of Wollega University towards antimicrobial resistance.

Methods: An institution-based cross-sectional study design was employed from June to July 2019. Epi-data version 3.1 was used to receive data and exported to SPSS version 25 for further analysis. Both bivariable and multivariable logistic regression analysis were done to find factors associated with attitudes of students towards antibiotic consumption and resistance at a 95% confidence level. The strength of association was measured with the odds ratio. Variables with a -value of <0.05 at multivariable analysis were considered to be a significant variable. Finally, texts and simple frequency tables were used to present the findings.

Results: Out of 249, 232 students were included in this survey yielding a response rate of 93.6%. Hundred fifty-eight (68.1%) of them had adequate knowledge about antibiotic identification, role, side effects, and resistance. Students with a family member who works in health and related professions had a lower probability of stopping antibiotics when they feel better (AOR = 0.50, 95% CI: 0.28-0.90) and using leftover antibiotics (AOR = 0.51, 95% CI: 0.28-0.92) compared to their counterparts.

Conclusion: Students' knowledge on antibiotic identification, role, side effects, and resistance was suboptimal, and the attitude of students towards antibiotic consumption was unfavorable. Respondents having a family member in a health-related field showed a good attitude. Respondents with three years of study also had a good attitude, female gender showed good attitude, and urban residence were independent predictors of attitude toward antibiotic consumption. Training on antimicrobial resistance should be arranged for graduating class nursing and medical students, as they are the future prescribers.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/IDR.S264481DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7650017PMC
November 2020

Predictors of Adherence to Self-Care Behavior Among Patients with Diabetes at Public Hospitals in West Ethiopia.

Diabetes Metab Syndr Obes 2020 18;13:3277-3288. Epub 2020 Sep 18.

School of Nursing and Midwifery, Institute of Health Sciences, Wollega University, Nekemte, Ethiopia.

Background: Diabetes is a typical chronic disease that needs integrated and multifaceted approaches. Self-care practices are fundamental to achieve good blood glucose control and prevent long-term complications. Therefore, the aim of the study was to determine the level and predictors of adherence to self-care behavior among patients with diabetes on follow-up at public hospitals of western Ethiopia.

Patients And Methods: The cross-sectional study design was employed on a sample of 423 diabetic patients on follow-up at public hospitals of western Ethiopia. A systematic random sampling method was employed. The data were entered into Epi data version 3.1 and exported into Statistical Package for the Social Sciences window version 24 for analysis. All variables significant at p-value <0.05 in the bivariable were entered in multivariate regression analysis. Backward stepwise goodness of fit was used to ascertain the suitable variables in multiple linear regression analysis. Finally, multivariate linear regression analysis with adjusted B, CI at 95%, and the significance level was set at p <0.05. All predictive variables were reported in terms of adjusted R2.

Results: The overall mean and standard deviation of adherence to self-care behavior was 23.09 ±6.55. Among the study participants, 42.70% had good self-care behavior. Self-efficacy (B=0.106, p<0.001), home blood glucose test (B=0.075, p<0.001), exercise per week (0.035, P<0.002), meal planning (B=0.039, P<0.001), dietary restriction (B=0.077, P<0.001), duration of diabetes<4 years (B=0.030, P<0.013), non-pharmacological intervention (B=0.055, P<0.011), and good appetite (B=0.039, P<0.045) were significant variables associated with adherence to self-care behaviors.

Conclusion: The overall level of adherence to self-care behavior was low. Therefore, we recommended that it is better if the national health policymaker focused on dietary management modality that engages patients' behavior change to develop self-care practices and closely monitoring of glucose level. Also, we recommended an additional longitudinal study incorporating a qualitative study that focused on behavioral changes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/DMSO.S266589DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7520154PMC
September 2020

Nurses' knowledge about palliative care and attitude towards end- of-life care in public hospitals in Wollega zones: A multicenter cross-sectional study.

PLoS One 2020 7;15(10):e0238357. Epub 2020 Oct 7.

Department of Mathematics, College of Natural and Computational Science, Wollega University, Nekemte, Ethiopia.

Background: Palliative care is nowadays essential in nursing care, due to the increasing number of patients who require attention in the final stages of their life. Lack of knowledge of and negative attitude palliative care among nurses is one of the most common barriers to quality palliative care. This study, therefore, aimed to assess nurses' knowledge about palliative care and attitude toward end-of-life care in public hospitals in Wollega zones, Ethiopia.

Methods: A multicenter institutional-based cross-sectional study design was employed to collect data from 372 nurses working in public hospitals in Wollega zones from October 02-22, 2019. A self-administered questionnaire with three different parts: Demographic characteristics of nurses, the Palliative Care Quiz for Nursing (PCQN), and the Frommelt Attitudes Towards Care of the Dying (FATCOD). SPSS version 21 was used for analysis used for data analysis. The binary logistic regression test was used for analysis at p < 0.05.

Findings: Our final sample size was 422 nurses (response rate = 88%). With the mean total PCQN scores (9.34), the majority of them showed an inadequate level of knowledge about palliative care. The mean total FATCOD scores (79.58) displayed a positive attitude toward end-of-life care, with 52% of respondents eager to care for a dying person and their family. Nurses who had PC service experience [AOR = 1.94 CI (1.10-3.42), p = 0.02] and had ever attended training/lecture on PC [AOR = 1.87 CI (1.01-3.46), p = 0.04] were independently associated with nurses' knowledge about PC. Similarly, nurses who had no PC service experience [AOR = 0.41, CI (0.21-0.79), p = 0.008], who read articles/brochures about PC [AOR = 1.94, CI (1.11-3.39), p = 0.01] and had provided care for a smaller number of terminally ill patients [AOR = 1.74, CI (1.01-2.97), p = 0.04] were significantly associated with nurses' attitude towards end-of-life care.

Conclusion: The study highlighted that nurses' knowledge about palliative care is inadequate, and showed a less favorable attitude toward end-of-life care. The findings also provide evidence for greater attentions and resources should be directed towards educating and supporting nurses caring for patients with palliative care needs in Wollega Zones.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0238357PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7540839PMC
November 2020

Nursing students' knowledge on the management of peripheral venous catheters at Wollega University.

PLoS One 2020 17;15(9):e0238881. Epub 2020 Sep 17.

College of Natural and Computational Science, Wollega University, Nekemte, Ethiopia.

Background: Adherence to the best standards of nursing practice is the fundamental principle to improve patient outcome and prevent nursing procedure related-infections. A peripheral venous catheter (PVC) is the most common invasive procedure performed in nursing care. Its poor performance could expose patients to bloodstream-related infections. The present study aimed to assess post-basic nursing students' knowledge of evidence-based guidelines on the management of peripheral venous catheters.

Methods: A cross-sectional study design was conducted on May 01-03, 2019, using a convenient sample 239 among post-basic nursing students in Wollega University.

Results: The study result showed that nursing students' had a low mean (4.1±1.52) of knowledge about PVC procedure management. Only 41% of the respondents have adhered to recommendations of CDC guidelines. Among the provided options of the items, none achieved 100% correct answers. The majority of nursing students (77%) responded that antiseptic handwashing is always performed before insertion of PVCs. Meanwhile, few students (5%) correctly answered that the infusion set is recommended to be removed after 96 hours when neither lipids nor blood products are administered. In multivariable regression analysis, nursing students who had received training (AOR = 2.9, 95% CI (1.6, 5.1)) and who were younger (AOR = 2.4, 95% CI (1.3, 4.3)) significantly associated with a higher score of knowledge.

Conclusions: This study finding shows that an overall level of knowledge of post-basic nursing students is inadequate. Measurements such as an increase in the provision of adequate training by nurses educators based on evidence-based guidelines could improve the post-basic nursing students' knowledge.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0238881PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7498047PMC
October 2020

Factors Associated with Timely Antenatal Care Booking Among Pregnant Women in Remote Area of Bule Hora District, Southern Ethiopia.

Int J Womens Health 2020 24;12:657-666. Epub 2020 Aug 24.

Department of Public Health, Institute of Health Sciences, Wollega University, Nekemte, Ethiopia.

Background: Antenatal care (ANC) is one of the most cost-effective and crucial components of maternal health care services. In developing countries where access to care, empowerment, and decision making power of women is low, ANC service is vital. The time at which first ANC visit was done has the utmost importance to ensure optimal health effects for both women and children. This study aimed to assess the proportion and factors associated with early antenatal care booking among pregnant women who were attending public health institutions in a remote area of Bule Hora district, Southern Ethiopia, from May to July, 2019.

Methods: Institutional-based cross-sectional study design was conducted at Bule Hora district public health facilities. Data were collected on systematically selected 377 pregnant women from 1st May to 30th July 2019. The sample size was determined by single population proportion formula and data were collected by using a standardized and pretested questionnaire and entered into Epidata 3.1 version, and then exported to Statistical Package for Social Science (SPSS) version 25 for analysis. The strength of association was measured by odds ratios with 95% confidence interval (CI) at a p-value of <0.05 and finally obtained results were presented by using simple frequency tables, bar graph, and texts.

Results: The proportion of early antenatal care booking among pregnant women attending antenatal care in the study area was 57.8%. Factors contributing to early antenatal care booking were husband's education (Adjusted odds ratio (AOR), 2.5; 95% CI: 1.2, 4.9), knowledge on antenatal care service (AOR,1.99; 95% CI:1.2,3.3), means of approving current pregnancy (AOR,1.8; 95% CI:1.1,2.8), and being advised before starting antenatal care visit (AOR,2.1; 95% CI:1.2,3.6).

Conclusion: Generally, the timely initiation of ANC among pregnant mothers is not ideal. Modifiable factors like husband's education, knowledge on antenatal care service, means of recognizing current pregnancy, and access to pre-ANC advice were found determinants for the timely initiation of ANC. Thus, it is advisable to provide proper information about antenatal care services by health care providers and enhancement of health extension program to increase community awareness before and during pregnancy at all levels of health care provision is very important.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/IJWH.S255009DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7457794PMC
August 2020

Self-stigma and medication adherence among patients with mental illness treated at Jimma University Medical Center, Southwest Ethiopia.

Int J Ment Health Syst 2020 29;14:56. Epub 2020 Jul 29.

Department of Nursing, Institute of Health Sciences, Wollega University, Nekemte, Ethiopia.

Background: Self-stigma associated with mental illness has remained a global public health issue affecting social interactions, health care, productivity and acceptance among others. It is one of important factors contributing to non-adherence to medication that leads to increased hospitalization and higher healthcare costs. Hence, the study aimed to assess self-stigma and medication adherence among patients with mental illness treated at the psychiatric clinic of Jimma University Medical Center (JUMC).

Methods: A cross-sectional, community-level study was conducted at Jimma town. The patient's data was collected from records between April and June 2017 and the collected data was analyzed using SPSS version 21. The Internalized Stigma of Mental Illness (ISMI) tool was utilized to measure internalized stigma. Linear regression analysis was performed to get the final model. Statistical significance association was considered at p-values less than 0.05 and 95% confidence interval was used.

Results: Males comprised more than half (61%) of the total sample of 300 respondents and with a mean age of 34.99 (SD ± 11.51) years. About one-third (32%) of patients had a working diagnosis of schizophrenia followed by major depressive disorder (24.3%). More than half of them, 182 (60.7%) were adherent to their psychotropic medication. The overall mean value of self-stigma was 2.16 (SD = 0.867) and 84 (28%) of the respondents had moderate to high self-stigma. Using ISMI the mean score of alienation was 2.26 (SD = 0.95), stereotype endorsement 2.14 (SD = 0.784), perceived discrimination 2.18 (SD = 0.90), social withdrawal 2.10 (SD = 0.857) and stigma resistance 2.11 (SD = 0.844). Increasing age of the patients (std. β = - 0.091, p = 0.009) and living with kids and spouse (std. β = - 0.099, p = 0.038) were negatively associated with self-stigma whereas increased world health organization disability assessment schedule (WHODAS) score (β = 0.501, p < 0.001), number of relapses (std. β = 0.183, p < 0.01) and medication non-adherence (std. β = 0.084, p = 0.021) were positively associated with self-stigma.

Conclusion: The study revealed that there was high self-stigma among patients with mental illness and a significant association between overall ISMI score and level of medication adherence. These require mental health professionals and policy-makers should give attention to ways to overcome self-stigma and increase medication adherence among patients with mental illness.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13033-020-00391-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7391813PMC
July 2020

Determinants of tuberculosis treatment outcome under directly observed treatment short courses in Adama City, Ethiopia.

PLoS One 2020 29;15(4):e0232468. Epub 2020 Apr 29.

Department of Nursing, Institute of Health Sciences, Wollega University, Nekemte, Ethiopia.

Background: Tuberculosis (TB) is a leading cause of death among infectious agents, ranking above HIV/AIDS. Though much effort has been done, Ethiopia remained one of those countries which share the greatest burden of TB. Evaluating the TB treatment outcome is one method of TB control measures. Therefore, the aim of the current study was to assess TB treatment outcome and its determinants under directly observed treatment short courses in Adama City, Central Ethiopia.

Method: An institutional based cross sectional study was conducted in all public and private health facilities of Adama city from March 1st 2016 to December 31st, 2016. The data were entered and analyzed by using SPSS version 21.0 statistical software. The results were presented using descriptive statistics. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression model was used to evaluate the potential determinants of unsuccessful treatment outcome.

Results: Among 281 patients evaluated, 90(32%) were cured, 137(48.8%) have completed the treatment, 4(1.4%) were treatment failure, 36(12.8%) were lost to follow up, and 14 (5%) died. The overall treatment success rate was 80.8%. Age 15-24 (Adjusted odds ratio (AOR): 4.97; 95% Confidence interval (CI): 1.13-21.90), distance less than 5 kilometers from treatment center (AOR: 3.1; 95% CI: 1.42-6.77), being seronegative for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) (AOR: 20.38; 95% CI: 7.80-53.24) were associated with successful TB treatment outcome.

Conclusion: The treatment outcome of all forms tuberculosis patients in Adama city was unsatisfactory when referred with the national pooled estimate of 86% and WHO 2030 international target of ≥90%. Thus, enhancing client supervision, treatment monitoring; and working on provision TB treatment services at nearby health facilities should be a priority concern to improve the success rate of treatment outcome. Further studies are also recommended to explore important factors which were not examined by current study.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0232468PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7190142PMC
July 2020

Essential new-born care practices and associated factors among post natal mothers in Nekemte City, Western Ethiopia.

PLoS One 2020 21;15(4):e0231354. Epub 2020 Apr 21.

School of Nursing and Midwifery, Institute of Health Science, Wollega University, Nekemte, Ethiopia.

Background: New-born survival is a prominent goal on the global health agenda and an important area of focus for programs seeking to ensure child survival. Geographically, neonatal deaths are most prevalent in Sub-Saharan Africa and southern Asia, accounting for 39% and 38% of all neonatal deaths respectively while Ethiopia in particular has 28% neonatal death. Promotion of essential new-born care practice is one of a cheap approach to improve health outcomes of new-born babies. Thus, this study was aimed to assess the magnitude of essential new-born care practices and associated factors among postnatal mothers in Nekemte city, Western Ethiopia.

Methods: An institution-based cross-sectional study was conducted from February to March, 2017, in Nekemte city, East Wollega Zone. Data was collected from 417 randomly selected mothers who have less than six months infants by face to face interview in three public health institutions of Nekemte City, Ethiopia. Women who were not biological mother to the new-born were excluded from the study. The collected data were coded, cleaned and entered using Epi-Data version 3.1 and analysed using Statistical Package for Social Science (SPSS) version 21.0. Both bivariable and multivariable logistic regression analysis were computed to identify associated factors. The strength of association was measured by odds ratios with 95% confidence interval (CI) at a p-value of < 0.05 and finally obtained results were presented by using simple frequency tables, graphs, and charts.

Results: The study revealed that the level of essential new-born care practice was 184(44.1%). The overall safe cord care practice of the respondents was 285 (68.3%) while the optimal thermal care practices and good neonatal feeding were 328 (78.7%) and 322 (77.2%) respectively. Having visit to Antenatal Care (ANC) [Adjusted Odds Ratio (AOR) = 4.38, 95% CI = (1.38, 13.94)], knowledge of essential new-born care [AOR = 4.58, 95% CI = (2.93, 7.16)], and counselled about essential new-born care [AOR = 2.32, 95% CI = (1.38, 3.91)] were factors significantly associated with good practices of essential new-born care.

Conclusion: This study indicated that the level of essential new-born care practice was unsatisfactory in the study area. Promotion of essential new-born care through the provision of community awareness and provision of counselling on essential new-born care and neonatal danger signs to all pregnant women should be given emphasis.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0231354PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7173873PMC
July 2020

Under nutrition as a predictor of poor academic performance; the case of Nekemte primary schools students, Western Ethiopia.

BMC Res Notes 2019 Nov 6;12(1):727. Epub 2019 Nov 6.

Rift Valley University, Nekemte, Ethiopia.

Objective: Though gradual improvements are exist; Ethiopia's learning outcomes are still low in primary schools. Academic achievement of school age children can be affected by several factors such as nutritional status, socio-economic and demographic factors. The aim of this study was to assess predictors of poor academic performance in Nekemte Primary school students, Western Ethiopia.

Results: A total of 362 schoolchildren and their parents were involved in the study. The study involved interviewing the participants and their parents, anthropometric measurement of participants and their document review. The prevalence of stunting and underweight was 30.2% and 45.9% respectively. Of the total study participants, 32.2% of them were poor in academic achievement. Variables like Being underweight (Adjusted odds ratio (AOR): 0.57; 95% Confidence interval (CI) 0.23-0.82), Skipping breakfast (AOR: 2.1; 95% CI 1.42-5.76), stunting (AOR: 0.66; 95% CI 0.12-0.93), being male (AOR: 2.8; 95% CI 1.79-4.52), participants whom mothers didn't attend formal education (AOR: 0.62; 95% CI 0.37-0.92) were significantly associated with academic performance. Thus, Modifiable factors like under nutrition should be a great concern to improve the overall achievement of children in schooling.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13104-019-4771-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6836505PMC
November 2019

Family planning need of people living with HIV/AIDS in antiretroviral therapy clinics of Horro Guduru Wollega zone, Ethiopia.

Authors:
Reta Tsegaye

BMC Res Notes 2017 Nov 9;10(1):581. Epub 2017 Nov 9.

Department of Nursing and Midwifery, College of Health Sciences, Wollega University, P.O. Box 395, Nekemte, Ethiopia.

Objective: The purpose of this study was to identify factors associated with family planning needs among people living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in Ethiopia.

Results: Three hundred twenty-one participants provided information on family planning methods and associated factors. Forty-six-point four percent of respondents reported using at least one form of family planning method; injectables (50.3%) and condoms (70.2%) were the most commonly used type of family planning method before and after HIV diagnosis, respectively. Age, the desire to have children, and the desire to have more than two children were significantly associated with the use of family planning methods.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13104-017-2914-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5679377PMC
November 2017
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