Publications by authors named "Renuka M Vesey"

4 Publications

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The Effect of Vibration Therapy on Walking Endurance in Children and Young People With Cerebral Palsy: Do Age and Gross Motor Function Classification System Matter?

Arch Rehabil Res Clin Transl 2020 Sep 20;2(3):100068. Epub 2020 Jun 20.

Exercise Sciences Department, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand.

Objective: To investigate the effect of age and Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS) level on walking endurance after 20 weeks of vibration therapy in children and young people with cerebral palsy (CP).

Design: The study was a clinical trial without control group comparing baseline and postintervention outcomes within participants.

Setting: Vibration therapy was performed at school or at home. Assessments took place in a clinical research unit.

Participants: Children and young people (N=59) with CP, aged 5-20 years, GMFCS level II, III, or IV, recruited through schools, physiotherapy services, and District Health Board clinics, Auckland, New Zealand.

Interventions: Participants performed side-alternating whole-body vibration therapy (WBVT) at 20 Hz and 3-mm amplitude, 9 minutes per day, 4 times per week for 20 weeks.

Main Outcome Measures: Distance walked in the 6-minute walk test (6MWT) was recorded before and after the intervention.

Results: Participants baseline results for the 6MWT were lower, independent of age or GMFCS, when compared to non-CP literature. On average, participants walked 12% further in the 6MWT after the intervention (<.001). There was significant improvement in 6MWT distance in all age groups (5-10y: 16%, <.001; 11-15y: 10%, =.001; 16-20y: 13%, <.001) and all GMFCS levels (level II: 10%, <.001, level III: 40%, =.013, level IV: 57%, =.007). There was a greater percentage improvement in the distance walked in those with GMFCS level III and level IV than level II (=.049 and <.001, respectively).

Conclusions: WBVT had a beneficial effect on walking endurance in children and young people with CP, independent of age and GMFCS.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.arrct.2020.100068DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7853375PMC
September 2020

Microinstability of the hip: a systematic review of the imaging findings.

Skeletal Radiol 2020 Dec 25;49(12):1903-1919. Epub 2020 Jun 25.

University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, WI, USA.

Objectives: To undertake a systematic review of the morphologic features associated with hip microinstability and determine whether there are suggestive or diagnostic imaging findings.

Methods: Four electronic databases were searched up to September 2019 to identify original research reporting morphologic features in individuals with either a clinical diagnosis of hip microinstability (instability without overt subluxation/dislocation) or those with symptomatic laxity demonstrated on imaging (increased femoral head translation/distraction or capsular volume). Studies focussing on individuals with pre-existing hip conditions (including definite dysplasia (lateral centre edge angle < 20°), significant trauma, previous dislocation or surgery were excluded. Methodological quality was assessed by the Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies 2 tool.

Results: Twenty-two studies met inclusion criteria (clinical diagnosis of microinstability n = 15 and demonstration of laxity n = 7). Imaging information gathered from the studies includes radiographs (n = 14), MRI (n = 6), MR arthrography (n = 4), CT (n = 1) and intraoperative examination. Most studies exhibited design features associated with an overall high or unclear risk of bias. Some dysplastic features are associated with microinstability or laxity reference measures; however, microinstability is frequently diagnosed in those with a lateral centre edge angle > 25°. Other associated imaging findings reported include impingement morphology, anterior labral tearing, femoral head chondral injury, ligamentum teres tears and capsular attenuation.

Conclusions: The current literature does not provide strong evidence for imaging features diagnostic of microinstability. In the appropriate clinical context, dysplastic morphology, anterior labral tears and ligamentum teres tears may be suggestive of this condition although further research is needed to confirm this.

Prospero Registration: CRD42019122406.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00256-020-03516-7DOI Listing
December 2020

Safety, feasibility and efficacy of side-alternating vibration therapy on bone and muscle health in children and adolescents with musculoskeletal disorders: A pilot trial.

J Paediatr Child Health 2020 Aug 21;56(8):1257-1262. Epub 2020 May 21.

Liggins Institute, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand.

Aims: A pilot study was performed to establish the safety, feasibility and efficacy of vibration therapy (VT) on bone and muscle health in children and adolescents with a range of musculoskeletal disorders.

Methods: Seventeen participants (15.7 years ± 2.9 years), with conditions that impacted on their musculoskeletal health, completed 20 weeks of side-alternating VT for 9 min/session, 4 times/week at 20 Hz. Data were collected at baseline and after 20 weeks of intervention. Assessments included whole-body dual-energyX-ray absorptiometry, muscle function (force plate) and 6-min walk test.

Results: Compliance with the prescribed VT training protocol was relatively high overall at 78% and there were no adverse events reported. After 20 weeks intervention, functional assessments showed time taken to perform the chair test was reduced by 15% (P = 0.018), leg balance improved with standard ellipse area decreasing by 88% (P = 0.006) and distance walked in the 6-min walk test improved by 9% (P = 0.002). Participants displayed increased total body mass (1.94 kg; P = 0.018) with increased lean mass (1.20 kg; P = 0.019) but not fat mass (P = 0.19). There was no change in total body bone mineral density (P = 0.44) or bone mineral content (P = 0.07).

Conclusions: Twenty weeks of side-alternating VT was a feasible protocol that was associated with improvements in physical function and no detrimental effects on lean mass, bone mass or density in children and adolescents with musculoskeletal disorders.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jpc.14913DOI Listing
August 2020

The Effects of 20 Weeks of Side-Alternating Vibration Therapy on Physical Function, Bone and Muscle Health in Adolescents with Down Syndrome.

Phys Occup Ther Pediatr 2021 28;41(1):44-55. Epub 2020 Apr 28.

Liggins Institute, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand.

Aims: To evaluate the effects of side-alternating vibration therapy on physical function and body composition in adolescents with Down syndrome.

Methods: Fourteen adolescents (8 males) with Down syndrome (mean ± SD age: 15.5 ± 2.3 years) performed vibration treatment nine minutes daily, four times per week, for 20 weeks on a Galileo vibration platform. Data were collected at baseline and after 20 weeks of intervention. Assessments included six-minute walk test, muscle function (force plate), whole-body dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and peripheral quantitative computed tomography of the non-dominant tibia.

Results: After 20 weeks, participants increased their distance walked in the six-minute walk test ( = 0.009), 2-leg single jump efficiency ( = 0.024) and jump velocity ( = 0.046). Participants also increased their power ( = 0.034) and reduced the time taken during the chair rise test ( < 0.001). At the total body level, increases were seen in bone mineral density ( = 0.004), bone mineral content ( = 0.043), fat free mass ( = 0.013) and lean mass ( = 0.021).

Conclusion: Side-alternating vibration therapy was associated with increases in physical function and muscle mass with no effects on bone health in adolescents with Down syndrome.

Clinical Trial Registration Number: Australian New Zealand Clinical Trial Registry (ACTRN12615000092594) - registered on 4 February 2015.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/01942638.2020.1758983DOI Listing
April 2020