Publications by authors named "Renate A Ganzevles"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Casein Protein Processing Strongly Modulates Post-Prandial Plasma Amino Acid Responses In Vivo in Humans.

Nutrients 2020 Jul 31;12(8). Epub 2020 Jul 31.

NUTRIM School of Nutrition and Translation Research in Metabolism, Maastricht University Medical Centre, P.O. Box 616, 6200 MD Maastricht, The Netherlands.

Micellar casein is characterized as a slowly digestible protein source, and its structure can be modulated by various food processing techniques to modify its functional properties. However, little is known about the impact of such modifications on casein protein digestion and amino acid absorption kinetics and the subsequent post-prandial plasma amino acid responses. In the present study, we determined post-prandial aminoacidemia following ingestion of isonitrogenous amounts of casein protein (40 g) provided as micellar casein (Mi-CAS), calcium caseinate (Ca-CAS), or cross-linked sodium caseinate (XL-CAS). Fifteen healthy, young men (age: 26 ± 4 years, BMI: 23 ± 1 kg·m) participated in this randomized cross-over study and ingested 40 g Mi-Cas, Ca-CAS, and XL-CAS protein, with a ~1 week washout between treatments. On each trial day, arterialized blood samples were collected at regular intervals during a 6 h post-prandial period to assess plasma amino acid concentrations using ultra-performance liquid chromatography. Plasma amino acid concentrations were higher following the ingestion of XL-CAS when compared to Mi-CAS and Ca-CAS from t = 15 to 90 min (all < 0.05). Plasma amino acid concentrations were higher following ingestion of Mi-CAS compared to Ca-CAS from t = 30 to 45 min (both < 0.05). Plasma total amino acids iAUC were higher following the ingestion of XL-CAS when compared to Ca-CAS (294 ± 63 vs. 260 ± 75 mmol·L, = 0.006), with intermediate values following Mi-CAS ingestion (270 ± 63 mmol·L, > 0.05). In conclusion, cross-linked sodium caseinate is more rapidly digested when compared to micellar casein and calcium caseinate. Protein processing can strongly modulate the post-prandial rise in plasma amino acid bioavailability in vivo in humans.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/nu12082299DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7468913PMC
July 2020

Polysaccharide charge density regulating protein adsorption to air/water interfaces by protein/polysaccharide complex formation.

J Phys Chem B 2007 Nov 19;111(45):12969-76. Epub 2007 Oct 19.

Wageningen Centre for Food Sciences, P.O. Box 557, 6700 AN Wageningen, The Netherlands.

Because the formation of protein/polysaccharide complexes is dominated by electrostatic interaction, polysaccharide charge density is expected to play a major role in the adsorption behavior of the complexes. In this study, pullulan (a non-charged polysaccharide) carboxylated to four different charge densities (fraction of carboxylated subunits: 0.1, 0.26, 0.51, and 0.56) was used to investigate the effect of charge density on the properties of mixed protein/polysaccharide adsorbed layers at air/water interfaces. With all pullulan samples, soluble complexes with beta-lactoglobulin could be formed at low ionic strength, pH 4.5. It was shown that the higher was the pullulan charge density, the more the increase of surface pressure in time was retarded as compared to that for pure beta-lactoglobulin. The retardation was even more pronounced for the development of the dilatational modulus. The lower dilatational modulus can be explained by the ability of the polysaccharides to prevent the formation of a compact protein layer at the air/water interface due to electrostatic repulsion. This ability of the polysaccharides to prevent "layer compactness" increases with the net negative charge of the complexes. If charge density is sufficient (> or = 0.26), polysaccharides may enhance the cohesion between complexes within the adsorbed layer. The charge density of polysaccharides is shown to be a dominant regulator of both the adsorption kinetics as well as the resulting surface rheological behavior of the mixed layers formed. These findings have significant value for the application of complex protein-polysaccharide systems.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/jp075441kDOI Listing
November 2007

Structure of mixed beta-lactoglobulin/pectin adsorbed layers at air/water interfaces; a spectroscopy study.

J Colloid Interface Sci 2008 Jan 18;317(1):137-47. Epub 2007 Sep 18.

TI Food and Nutrition/Wageningen Centre for Food Sciences, Po Box 557, 6700 AN Wageningen, The Netherlands.

Based on earlier reported surface rheological behaviour two factors appeared to be important for the functional behaviour of mixed protein/polysaccharide adsorbed layers at air/water interfaces: (1) protein/polysaccharide mixing ratio and (2) formation history of the layers. In this study complexes of beta-lactoglobulin (positively charged at pH 4.5) and low methoxyl pectin (negatively charged) were formed at two mixing ratios, resulting in negatively charged and nearly neutral complexes. Neutron reflection showed that adsorption of negative complexes leads to more diffuse layers at the air/water interface than adsorption of neutral complexes. Besides (simultaneous) adsorption of protein/polysaccharide complexes, a mixed layer can also be formed by adsorption of (protein/)polysaccharide (complexes) to a pre-formed protein layer (sequential adsorption). Despite similar bulk concentrations, adsorbed layer density profiles of simultaneously and sequentially formed layers were persistently different, as illustrated by neutron reflection analysis. Time resolved fluorescence anisotropy showed that the mobility of protein molecules at an air/water interface is hampered by the presence of pectin. This hampered mobility of protein through a complex layer could account for differences observed in density profiles of simultaneously and sequentially formed layers. These insights substantiated the previously proposed organisations of the different adsorbed layers based on surface rheological data.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jcis.2007.09.030DOI Listing
January 2008

Modulating surface rheology by electrostatic protein/polysaccharide interactions.

Langmuir 2006 Nov;22(24):10089-96

Wageningen Centre for Food Sciences, P.O. Box 557, 6700 AN Wageningen, The Netherlands.

There is a large interest in mixed protein/polysaccharide layers at air-water and oil-water interfaces because of their ability to stabilize foams and emulsions. Mixed protein/polysaccharide adsorbed layers at air-water interfaces can be prepared either by adsorption of soluble protein/polysaccharide complexes or by sequential adsorption of complexes or polysaccharides to a previously formed protein layer. Even though the final protein and polysaccharide bulk concentrations are the same, the behavior of the adsorbed layers can be very different, depending on the method of preparation. The surface shear modulus of a sequentially formed beta-lactoglobulin/pectin layer can be up to a factor of 6 higher than that of a layer made by simultaneous adsorption. Furthermore, the surface dilatational modulus and surface shear modulus strongly (up to factors of 2 and 7, respectively) depend on the bulk -lactoglobulin/pectin mixing ratio. On the basis of the surface rheological behavior, a mechanistic understanding of how the structure of the adsorbed layers depends on the protein/polysaccharide interaction in bulk solution, mixing ratio, ionic strength, and order of adsorption to the interface (simultaneous or sequential) is derived. Insight into the effect of protein/polysaccharide interactions on the properties of adsorbed layers provides a solid basis to modulate surface rheological behavior.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/la061537eDOI Listing
November 2006
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