Publications by authors named "René van der Griend"

14 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Web-Based Self-Management for Patients With Lymphoma: Assessment of the Reach of Intervention of a Randomized Controlled Trial.

J Med Internet Res 2020 05 14;22(5):e17018. Epub 2020 May 14.

Netherlands Comprehensive Cancer Organisation, Utrecht, Netherlands.

Background: Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) often provide accurate estimates of the internal validity of an intervention but lack information on external validity (generalizability). We conducted an RCT on the effectiveness of a self-management intervention among patients with lymphoma in a population-based setting.

Objective: The objectives of the current study were to describe the proportion of RCT participants compared to all patients invited to participate, and compare sociodemographic and clinical characteristics of RCT participants with all respondents, all patients invited to participate, and all patients selected from the Netherlands Cancer Registry (NCR) to determine the reach of the intervention. An additional objective was to assess differences on RCT outcome variables between RCT and paper respondents.

Methods: Patients with lymphoma or chronic lymphocytic leukemia ≥18 years old at diagnosis from 13 hospitals in the Netherlands were selected from the population-based NCR, which routinely collects data on sociodemographic and clinical characteristics. Eligible patients were invited to participate in an RCT and complete a questionnaire. Web-based completion determined RCT enrollment, whereas paper respondents were followed observationally.

Results: A total of 1193 patients were selected from the NCR, 892 (74.77%) of whom were invited to participate in the trial by their hematologist after verifying eligibility. Among those invited, 25.4% (227/892) completed the web-based questionnaire and were enrolled in the RCT. The RCT participants were younger and there was a higher proportion of men than nonparticipants (P<.001). In addition, 25.7% (229/892) of those invited opted to participate in the paper-based observational follow-up study. Compared with paper respondents, RCT participants were younger (P<.001), with a higher proportion of men (P=.002), and had higher education levels (P=.02). RCT participants more often wanted to receive all available information on their disease (P<.001), whereas paper respondents reported higher levels of emotional distress (P=.009).

Conclusions: From a population-based sample of eligible patients, the participation rate in the RCT was approximately 25%. RCT participants may not be representative of the target population because of different sociodemographic and clinical characteristics. Since RCT participants represent a minority of the target population, RCT results should be interpreted with caution as patients in the RCT may be those least in need of a self-management intervention.

Trial Registration: Netherlands Trial Register NTR5953; https://www.trialregister.nl/trial/5790.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2196/17018DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7256744PMC
May 2020

Geriatric assessment in older patients with a hematologic malignancy: a systematic review.

Haematologica 2020 06 7;105(6):1484-1493. Epub 2020 May 7.

Department of Geriatric Medicine, Diakonessenhuis Utrecht, Utrecht, the Netherlands.

The aim of this systematic review is to give an update of all currently available evidence on the relevance of a geriatric assessment in the treatment of older patients with hematologic malignancies. A systematic search in MEDLINE and EMBASE was performed to find studies in which a geriatric assessment was used to detect impaired geriatric domains or to address the association between geriatric assessment and survival or clinical outcome measures. The literature search included 4,629 reports, of which 54 publications from 44 studies were included. Seventy-three percent of the studies were published in the last 5 years. The median age of the patients was 73 years (range, 58-86) and 71% had a good World Health Organization (WHO) performance status. The median prevalence of geriatric impairments varied between 17% and 68%, even in patients with a good WHO performance status. Polypharmacy, nutritional status and instrumental activities of daily living were most frequently impaired. Whereas several geriatric impairments and frailty (based on a frailty screening tool or summarized geriatric assessment score) were predictive for a shorter overall survival, WHO performance status lost its predictive value in most studies. The association between geriatric impairments and treatment-related toxicity varied, with a trend towards a higher risk of (non-)hematologic toxicity in frail patients. During the follow-up, frailty seemed to be associated with treatment non-completion, especially when patients were malnourished. Patients with a good physical capacity had a shorter stay in hospital and a lower rate of hospitalization. Geriatric assessment, even in patients with a good performance status, can detect impaired geriatric domains and these impairments may be predictive of mortality. Moreover, geriatric impairments suggest a higher risk of treatment-related toxicity, treatment non-completion and use of healthcare services. A geriatric assessment should be considered before starting treatment in older patients with hematologic malignancies.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3324/haematol.2019.245803DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7271571PMC
June 2020

An ICU patient with spots and a peculiar pneumonia.

BMJ Case Rep 2013 Mar 20;2013. Epub 2013 Mar 20.

Department of Internal Medicine, Diakonessenhuis Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands.

This is the first report of varicella zoster virus (VZV) pneumonia in an adult patient treated with rituximab because of autoimmune haemolytic anaemia and it illustrates that a VZV infection should be considered when an immunocompromised patient develops pulmonary symptoms, even in the absence of cutaneous lesions. It also depicts the importance of performing varicella serology in patients receiving multiple immunosuppressive agents.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bcr-2013-008693DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3618846PMC
March 2013

A prognostic model for short term adverse events in normotensive patients with pulmonary embolism.

Am J Hematol 2011 Aug 31;86(8):646-9. Epub 2011 May 31.

Department of Internal Medicine, Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care University Medical Centre Utrecht, The Netherlands.

Risk stratification of patients with PE has gained interest in terms of the identification of patients in whom treatment on an outpatient base can be considered. Previous studies are of limited value due to their focus on adverse clinical events within several months after diagnosis of PE. We developed a prognostic model, based on easily accessible, clinical, and laboratory parameters, to predict adverse events during the first 10 days after the diagnosis of acute PE. We have analyzed the data of 210 outpatients with confirmed PE. Collected data included medical history, pulse rate, blood pressure, NT-proBNP, and D-dimer concentrations. The primary outcome was the occurrence of adverse clinical events in a 10 day follow-up period. Our final prognostic model to predict short-term adverse events consists of NT-proBNP levels, D-dimer concentrations, pulse rate, and the occurrence of active malignancy; the total score ranges from 0 to 37 points. Patients with a low score (no active malignancy, pulse rate <90 bpm, NT-proBNP <500 pg/ml, and D-dimer <3,000 μg/l FEU) have a 10-day adverse event risk <1.5%. This risk increases to over 30% in patients with a maximum score, based on high pulse rate, D-dimer concentrations, and NT-proBNP levels. Our prognostic model, once prospectively validated in an independent sample of patients, can be used in the early risk stratification of PE to estimate the risk of adverse events and to differentiate between candidates for in- or out- hospital treatment.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ajh.22066DOI Listing
August 2011

Out of hospital anticoagulant therapy in patients with acute pulmonary embolism is frequently practised but not perfect.

Thromb Res 2010 Dec;126(6):481-5

Department of Internal Medicine, University Medical Centre Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands.

Introduction: Traditionally, patients with pulmonary embolism (PE) are treated in-hospital until they reach an adequate international normalized ratio (INR). Analogous to patients with a deep venous thrombosis, therapy with low-molecular-weight heparin facilitates out of hospital treatment of PE. We retrospectively analysed the current practice of early anticoagulant therapy in 86 acute PE patients with emphasis on the occurrence and safety of outpatient treatment.

Methods: Data were collected from two large regional teaching hospitals and from a specialized anticoagulation clinical, where patients were followed in the period after hospital discharge. The course of hospitalization and LMWH transitioning therapy and the quality of treatment in the first three months after diagnosis were compared between patients discharged before and patients discharged after reaching adequate INR.

Results: Forty-four patients (51.2%) were discharged early, before reaching an adequate INR, and 42 patients (48.8%) were discharged after reaching adequate INR. Early discharged patients needed more time to reach adequate INR compared to other patients (13 versus 6 days). In 28 patients (32.6%), the LMWH transitioning therapy was stopped prematurely; 21 patients were from the early discharged group. During the first 3 months, the mean individual times below, in and above the INR range were equal between the two groups.

Conclusion: Enhanced compliance to existing guidelines and tools, and further development of guidelines, with focus on intensification of monitoring of INR values in an outpatient setting and preventing premature discontinuation of transitioning therapy, are warranted for a safe and early discharge of stable patients with PE.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.thromres.2010.08.019DOI Listing
December 2010

Phase III study of the value of thalidomide added to melphalan plus prednisone in elderly patients with newly diagnosed multiple myeloma: the HOVON 49 Study.

J Clin Oncol 2010 Jul 1;28(19):3160-6. Epub 2010 Jun 1.

Haga Hospital, Leyweg 275, the Hague, the Netherlands.

Purpose: For several decades, the treatment of elderly patients with multiple myeloma (MM) has consisted of melphalan and prednisone (MP). The Dutch-Belgium Hemato-Oncology Cooperative Group (HOVON) investigated the efficacy of thalidomide added to MP (MP-T) in a randomized phase III trial. The objective of this study was to investigate the efficacy, toxicity, and effects on quality of life of MP-T.

Patients And Methods: A randomized phase III trial compared standard MP with MP-T (thalidomide 200 mg/d) in newly diagnosed patients with multiple myeloma older than age 65 years. Maintenance therapy with thalidomide 50 mg/d was administered to patients after MP-T until relapse. The primary end point was event-free survival (EFS); response rate, overall survival (OS), and progression-free survival (PFS) were secondary end points.

Results: An intent-to-treat analysis of 333 evaluable patients showed significantly higher response rates in MP-T-treated patients compared with MP-treated patients a response (> or = partial response: 66% v 45%, respectively; P < .001; and > or = very good partial response [VGPR]: 27% v 10%, respectively; P < .001). EFS was 13 months with MP-T versus 9 months with MP (P < .001). OS was 40 months with MP-T versus 31 months with MP (P = .05).

Conclusion: This study demonstrates that thalidomide improves the response rate and VGPR in elderly patients with newly diagnosed MM. MP-T also results in a better EFS, PFS, and OS.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1200/JCO.2009.26.1610DOI Listing
July 2010

The effect of ranitidine on antibody responses to polysaccharide vaccines in patients with B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukaemia.

Eur J Haematol 2007 Jul 28;79(1):47-52. Epub 2007 May 28.

Department of Haematology, VU Medical Centre, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

Objectives: To analyse the effects of ranitidine treatment on vaccination induced antibody responses in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL).

Methods: Fifty CLL patients were vaccinated with tetanus conjugated Hib vaccine and a 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine with (n = 25) or without (n = 25) ranitidine treatment in a matched case--control setting. Anti tetanus toxoid (TT), anti-Hib and anti-pneumococcal antibody levels were determined before and after vaccination. Additionally, cytokine levels were assessed in patients treated with ranitidine.

Results: Vaccination-induced increases in anti-Hib and anti-TT antibody levels were higher in the ranitidine group compared with the control group. Anti-pneumococcal antibody responses were not improved by administration of ranitidine. Higher levels of IL-18 were found in patients treated with ranitidine compared with healthy controls. Levels of IL-6, IL-8, IL-18, RANTES, IP-10, sVCAM-1 and sICAM-1 were within normal ranges and did not change during ranitidine treatment.

Conclusion: Ranitidine treatment improves vaccination-induced T-cell dependent antibody responses in patients with CLL but has no beneficial effect on the response to vaccination with unconjugated polysaccharide antigens.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1600-0609.2007.00862.xDOI Listing
July 2007

Dose-finding study of high-dose simvastatin combined with standard chemotherapy in patients with relapsed or refractory myeloma or lymphoma.

Haematologica 2006 Apr;91(4):542-5

Department of Hematology and Immunology, University Medical Centre Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands.

In vitro statins induce apoptosis in myeloma and lymphoma cells in a dose-and time-dependent way. In combination with dexamethasone and doxorubicin, statins have a chemo-sensitizing effect. Twenty-eight patients with relapsed myeloma or lymphoma were treated with a dose-escalating regimen of simvastatin for 7 days followed by VAD in myeloma patients and CHOP in lymphoma patients. The maximum tolerated dose was 15 mg/kg/day simvastatin. The most frequently reported side-effects were fatigue, gastrointestinal CTC grade 1-2 and neutropenic fever. The dose-limiting toxicity was neutropenic sepsis and grade 3 gastrointestinal side effects. High-dose simvastatin given immediately prior to chemotherapy is safe and tolerable up to a dose of 15 mg/kg/day.
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April 2006

Risk factors for thromboembolic complications in inflammatory bowel disease: the role of hyperhomocysteinaemia.

Dig Dis Sci 2005 Feb;50(2):235-40

Department of Gastroenterology, University Medical Center, Diakonessenhuis, Utrecht, The Netherlands.

Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is associated with an increased risk for thromboembolic events. Aim of this study was to examine the relationship of hyperhomocysteinemia and thrombosis in IBD patients and to assess the role of this factor in addition to other known prothrombotic abnormalities. IBD patients with a history of thrombosis (n = 22) and sex-, age-, and diagnosis-matched IBD controls (n = 23) were studied. Homocysteine (tHcy) was assessed before and after methionine loading. Plasma levels of protein C, protein S, antithrombin III, and fibrinogen and the presence of anticardiolipin and antiphospholipid antibodies were determined and genetic testing for factor V Leiden and the prothrombin gene mutation was performed. Results showed that fasting homocysteine levels in IBD patients with a history of arterial or venous thrombosis tended to be higher than in IBD controls, although not significantly. The increase in homocysteine levels after methionine loading was significantly higher in IBD patients in the arterial thrombosis group than in IBD controls (40.9 +/- 17.7 vs. 27.2 +/- 9.9 microM; P < 0.05). Among the other prothrombotic factors, only factor V Leiden was significantly associated with a history of venous thrombosis (20 vs. 0%). At least one risk factor was found in 64% of the IBD patients with previous thromboembolic complications. We conclude that there is an association between hyperhomocysteinemia and a history of arterial thrombosis in IBD patients. We confirm the high prevalence of factor V Leiden in IBD patients with a history of venous thrombosis. In the majority of IBD patients with previous thromboembolic complications, at least one prothrombotic risk factor is detected.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10620-005-1588-yDOI Listing
February 2005

A 2-step strategy to reduce the need for methionine-loading tests to diagnose hyperhomocysteinemia.

J Lab Clin Med 2003 Aug;142(2):121-7

Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care University Medical Center Utrecht, The Netherland.

An increased plasma homocysteine level may increase the risk of cardiovascular disease. The methionine-loading test is commonly used to detect additional subjects with hyperhomocysteinemia who have normal fasting levels of homocysteine but increased post-methionine-load levels. We developed a 2-step strategy to restrict the methionine-loading test to those subjects with intermediate fasting homocysteine levels to confirm the presence of hyperhomocysteinemia. Hyperhomocysteinemia was defined as a fasting plasma homocysteine level of 16.3 micro mol/L or greater in women and 18.8 micro mol/L or greater in men or an increase in plasma homocysteine level after methionine loading of more than 42.3 micro mol/L for both sexes. From the results in 201 patients, 50 years and younger, with manifest atherosclerosis who underwent a methionine-loading test, we derived cutoff points to define an intermediate group of patients who required a methionine-loading test for hyperhomocysteinemia to be ruled out. These cutoff points were validated in a different population of 275 cardiovascular patients of similar age. The prevalence of hyperhomocysteinemia was 30% in the derivation population and 24% in the validation population. To achieve a sensitivity of 90% in diagnosing hyperhomocysteinemia, we set cutoff points of 11.3 and 9.4 micro mol/L for men and women, respectively. When these cutoff points are applied, it is possible to avoid performing the methionine-loading test in 50% to 75% of subjects tested. With a 2-step strategy to diagnose hyperhomocysteinemia, a sensitivity of 90% for the diagnosis of hyperhomocysteinemia can be achieved, and the need for the methionine-loading test is reduced substantially, with 50% to 75% of subjects no longer needing it.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0022-2143(03)00103-3DOI Listing
August 2003

Postmethionine-load homocysteine determination for the diagnosis hyperhomocysteinaemia and efficacy of homocysteine lowering treatment regimens.

Vasc Med 2002 Feb;7(1):29-33

Department of Internal Medicine, Diakonessenhuis, Utrecht, The Netherlands.

Substantial epidemiological evidence supports the vision that moderate hyperhomocysteinaemia is a graded and independent cardiovascular risk factor. The additional value of the methionine loading test for the assessment of hyperhomocysteinaemia continues to be disputed. This overview presents the historical background for the rationale of the methionine loading test and describes determinants and variability of the postmethionine-load homocysteine concentration. The association of postmethionine-load homocysteine concentrations and the risk of cardiovascular events is discussed. Furthermore, the results of homocysteine lowering treatment on postmethionine-load homocysteine are given. Up to 50% of subjects with hyperhomocysteinaemia can only be detected after performing a methionine loading test; these subjects have a normal fasting homocysteine. Both fasting and postmethionine-load homocysteine concentrations are influenced by serum folate and creatinine concentrations and by the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase genotype, and may be subject to a wide intra-individual variability (approximately 20%). Cross-sectional studies suggest that cardiovascular risk may increase gradually from postmethionine-load homocysteine concentrations above 38 micromol/l. Supplementation with folic acid 0.5 mg daily adequately reduces postmethionine-load homocysteine; addition of pyridoxine appears to have no further homocysteine lowering effect. Prospective studies supporting the clinical significance of the methionine loading test for individual patient counselling are lacking; it seems, therefore, prudent to restrict this test for research purposes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1191/1358863x02vm407raDOI Listing
February 2002