Publications by authors named "Remi Houel"

15 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Femoral Versus Nonfemoral Peripheral Access for Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement.

J Am Coll Cardiol 2019 12;74(22):2728-2739

Department of Cardiology, La Cavale Blanche University Hospital Centre, Optimization of Physiological Regulations, Science and Technical Training And Research Unit, University of Western Brittany, Brest, France.

Background: Femoral access is the gold standard for transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR). Guidelines recommend reconsidering surgery when this access is not feasible. However, alternative peripheral accesses exist, although they have not been accurately compared with femoral access.

Objectives: This study compared nonfemoral peripheral (n-FP) TAVR with femoral TAVR.

Methods: Using the data from the national prospective French registry (FRANCE TAVI [French Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation]), this study compared the characteristics and outcomes of TAVR procedures according to whether they were performed through a femoral or a n-FP access, using a pre-specified propensity score-based matching between groups. Subanalysis during 2 study periods (2013 to 2015 and 2016 to 2017) and among low/intermediate-low and intermediate-high/high volume centers were performed.

Results: Among 21,611 patients, 19,995 (92.5%) underwent femoral TAVR and 1,616 (7.5%) underwent n-FP TAVR (transcarotid, n = 914 or trans-subclavian, n = 702). Patients in the n-FP access group had more severe disease (mean logistic EuroSCORE 19.95 vs. 16.95; p < 0.001), with a higher rate of peripheral vascular disease, known coronary artery disease, chronic pulmonary disease, and renal failure. After matching, there was no difference in the rate of post-procedural death and complications according to access site, except for a 2-fold lower rate of major vascular complications (odds ratio: 0.45; 95% confidence interval: 0.21 to 0.93; p = 0.032) and unplanned vascular repairs (odds ratio: 0.41; 95% confidence interval: 0.29 to 0.59; p < 0.001) in those who underwent n-FP access. The comparison of outcomes provided similar results during the second study period and in intermediate-high/high volume centers.

Conclusions: n-FP TAVR is associated with similar outcomes compared with femoral peripheral TAVR, except for a 2-fold lower rate of major vascular complications and unplanned vascular repairs. n-FP TAVR may be favored over surgery in patients who are deemed ineligible for femoral TAVR and may be a safe alternative when femoral access risk is considered too high.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jacc.2019.09.054DOI Listing
December 2019

Five-Year Clinical Outcome and Valve Durability After Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement in High-Risk Patients.

Circulation 2018 12;138(23):2597-2607

Department of Cardiology, Parly 2 Hospital, Le Chesnay, France (X.F.).

Background: The FRANCE-2 registry (French Aortic National Corevalve and Edwards) previously reported good early- and medium-term clinical and echocardiographic efficacy for transcatheter aortic valve replacement. We here report 5-year follow-up results from the registry.

Methods: The registry includes all consecutive patients undergoing transcatheter aortic valve replacement for severe aortic stenosis in France. Follow-up is scheduled at 30 days, 6 months, then annually from 1 to 5 years. Clinical events were defined according to the Valve Academic Research Consortium criteria, and hemodynamic structural valve deterioration (SVD) was defined according to the consensus statement by the European Association of Percutaneous Cardiovascular Interventions.

Results: Between January 2010 and January 2012, 4201 patients were enrolled in 34 centers. Five-year vital status was available for 95.5% of patients; 88.1% had clinical evaluation or died. Overall, at 5 years, all-cause mortality was 60.8% (n=2478; 95% CI, 59.3% to 62.3%). The majority of cardiovascular events occurred in the first month after valve implantation, and incidence remained low thereafter, at <2% per year up to 5 years, except for heart failure. The rate of heart failure was 14.3% at 1 year, then decreased over time to <5% per year. In cumulative incidence function, the rates of severe SVD and moderate/severe SVD at 5 years were 2.5% and 13.3%, respectively. Mortality did not differ between patients with or without severe SVD (hazard ratio, 0.71; 95% CI, 0.47-1.07; P=0.1). Finally, in the population of patients with severe SVD, 1 patient (1.7%) experienced a stroke, and 8 patients presented ≥1 heart failure event (13.3%).

Conclusions: The 5-year follow-up results of the FRANCE-2 registry represent the largest long-term data set available in a high-risk population. In surviving patients, the low rate of clinical events and the low level of SVD after 1 year support the long-term efficacy of transcatheter aortic valve replacement in both types of transcatheter prosthesis featuring in the registry.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.118.036866DOI Listing
December 2018

Late Outcomes of Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement in High-Risk Patients: The FRANCE-2 Registry.

J Am Coll Cardiol 2016 10;68(15):1637-1647

Department of Cardiology, Brest University Hospital, Brest, France.

Background: Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) has revolutionized management of high-risk patients with severe aortic stenosis. However, survival and the incidence of severe complications have been assessed in relatively small populations and/or with limited follow-up.

Objectives: This report details late clinical outcome and its determinants in the FRANCE-2 (FRench Aortic National CoreValve and Edwards) registry.

Methods: The FRANCE-2 registry prospectively included all TAVRs performed in France. Follow-up was scheduled at 30 days, at 6 months, and annually from 1 to 5 years. Standardized VARC (Valve Academic Research Consortium) outcome definitions were used.

Results: A total of 4,201 patients were enrolled between January 2010 and January 2012 in 34 centers. Approaches were transarterial (transfemoral 73%, transapical 18%, subclavian 6%, and transaortic or transcarotid 3%) or, in 18% of patients, transapical. Median follow-up was 3.8 years. Vital status was available for 97.2% of patients at 3 years. The 3-year all-cause mortality was 42.0% and cardiovascular mortality was 17.5%. In a multivariate model, predictors of 3-year all-cause mortality were male sex (p < 0.001), low body mass index, (p < 0.001), atrial fibrillation (p < 0.001), dialysis (p < 0.001), New York Heart Association functional class III or IV (p < 0.001), higher logistic EuroSCORE (p < 0.001), transapical or subclavian approach (p < 0.001 for both vs. transfemoral approach), need for permanent pacemaker implantation (p = 0.02), and post-implant periprosthetic aortic regurgitation grade ≥2 of 4 (p < 0.001). Severe events according to VARC criteria occurred mainly during the first month and subsequently in <2% of patients/year. Mean gradient, valve area, and residual aortic regurgitation were stable during follow-up.

Conclusions: The FRANCE-2 registry represents the largest database available on late results of TAVR. Late mortality is largely related to noncardiac causes. Incidence rates of severe events are low after the first month. Valve performance remains stable over time.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jacc.2016.07.747DOI Listing
October 2016

Registry of transcatheter aortic-valve implantation in high-risk patients.

N Engl J Med 2012 May;366(18):1705-15

Centre Hospitalier Universitaire (CHU) Brest, Brest, France.

Background: Transcatheter aortic-valve implantation (TAVI) is an emerging intervention for the treatment of high-risk patients with severe aortic stenosis and coexisting illnesses. We report the results of a prospective multicenter study of the French national transcatheter aortic-valve implantation registry, FRANCE 2.

Methods: All TAVIs performed in France, as listed in the FRANCE 2 registry, were prospectively included in the study. The primary end point was death from any cause.

Results: A total of 3195 patients were enrolled between January 2010 and October 2011 at 34 centers. The mean (±SD) age was 82.7±7.2 years; 49% of the patients were women. All patients were highly symptomatic and were at high surgical risk for aortic-valve replacement. Edwards SAPIEN and Medtronic CoreValve devices were implanted in 66.9% and 33.1% of patients, respectively. Approaches were either transarterial (transfemoral, 74.6%; subclavian, 5.8%; and other, 1.8%) or transapical (17.8%). The procedural success rate was 96.9%. Rates of death at 30 days and 1 year were 9.7% and 24.0%, respectively. At 1 year, the incidence of stroke was 4.1%, and the incidence of periprosthetic aortic regurgitation was 64.5%. In a multivariate model, a higher logistic risk score on the European System for Cardiac Operative Risk Evaluation (EuroSCORE), New York Heart Association functional class III or IV symptoms, the use of a transapical TAVI approach, and a higher amount of periprosthetic regurgitation were significantly associated with reduced survival.

Conclusions: This prospective registry study reflected real-life TAVI experience in high-risk elderly patients with aortic stenosis, in whom TAVI appeared to be a reasonable option. (Funded by Edwards Lifesciences and Medtronic.).
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1056/NEJMoa1114705DOI Listing
May 2012

Functional assessment of mitral regurgitation by transthoracic echocardiography using standardized imaging planes diagnostic accuracy and outcome implications.

J Am Coll Cardiol 2005 Jul;46(2):302-9

Department of Cardiology, Henri Mondor Hospital, Créteil, France (Assistance Publique Hôpitaux de Paris).

Objectives: We sought to assess the value of transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) using standardized imaging planes for the functional analysis of mitral regurgitation (MR) as well as for postoperative outcome implications.

Background: The feasibility of mitral valve repair is based on functional assessment of MR, mainly by transesophageal echocardiography (TEE). Considering the recent advances in TTE imaging, the incremental value of TEE in this setting needs to be re-examined.

Methods: Consecutive patients (n = 279; 181 men; median age 68 years [quartiles, 61 to 74]) who underwent surgery for MR were enrolled prospectively in two tertiary care centers. The accuracy of TTE (harmonic imaging) versus TEE for functional assessment of MR was evaluated against surgical findings.

Results: Valve repair (n = 237 patients, 85%) or replacement (n = 42) was predicted accurately by TTE in 97% of cases; TEE added significant information for only two patients. In the subgroup of degenerative MR (n = 190), agreement with surgical findings for the localization of prolapsed segments was 91% for TTE (kappa, 0.81) and 93% for TEE (kappa, 0.85) without incremental value of TEE (p = 0.40). Patients with single prolapse of the middle posterior scallop (P2) had a better postoperative outcome as compared with patients who had non-P2 lesions (p = 0.008). Furthermore, mitral replacement predicted by TTE was an independent predictor for postoperative long-term mortality (odds ratio 5.7, 95% confidence interval 1.97 to 16.4, p = 0.001).

Conclusions: In experienced hands, functional assessment of MR by TTE can predict accurately valve repairability and has a strong influence on postoperative outcome. Thus, in most cases preoperative TEE is not mandatory, provided intraoperative TEE is performed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jacc.2005.03.064DOI Listing
July 2005

The risk of reoperative heart valve procedures in Octogenarian patients.

J Heart Valve Dis 2004 Nov;13(6):991-6; discussion 996

Service de Chirurgie Thoracique et Cardiovasculaire, Hôpital Henri Mondor, Créteil, France.

Background And Aim Of The Study: The authors' experience is reported of cardiac reoperations for valvular heart disease in octogenarian patients.

Methods: The records of 22 consecutive patients (10 men, 12 women) aged > or =80 years (mean age 82.4+/-2.3 years) who underwent cardiac reoperation for aortic and/or mitral valvular heart disease at the authors' institution between 1991 and 2001 were retrospectively reviewed.

Results: Indications for reoperation were structural dysfunction of a previously implanted bioprosthetic valve in 11 patients (50%), new valvular heart disease in six (27%), progression of rheumatic valvular heart disease in four (18%), and prosthetic valve infective endocarditis in one patient (5%). Fourteen patients (64%) underwent isolated aortic valve replacement (AVR), two (9%) had AVR plus coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG), one patient (5%) had aortic root replacement plus CABG, three patients (14%) had isolated mitral valve replacement (MVR), one patient (5%) had MVR plus ascending aorta replacement, and one (5%) had AVR plus MVR. Postoperative complications occurred in 18 patients (82%). The hospital mortality rate was 32%. Actuarial survival estimates at one year, and at three and five years were 62.6%, 56.3% and 40.2%, respectively.

Conclusion: Cardiac reoperations for valvular heart disease in octogenarians carry a high postoperative morbidity and mortality. These findings must be taken into account in the management of associated mild or moderate valvular heart disease, and in the choice of heart valve prosthesis at the initial operation in younger patients.
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November 2004

Usefulness of routine epicardial pacing wire culture for early prediction of poststernotomy mediastinitis.

J Clin Microbiol 2004 Nov;42(11):5245-8

Service de Réanimation Médicale, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Henri Mondor, 94010 Créteil Cédex, France.

Poststernotomy mediastinitis (PSM) is one of the most serious complications of cardiac surgery, and its associated morbidity and mortality demand early recognition for emergency therapy. In this study, we investigated the usefulness of epicardial pacing wire (EPW) cultures for the prediction of PSM. Among 2,200 patients who underwent a cardiac surgical procedure at our hospital between 1 January 1999 and 31 December 2001, 82 (3.7%) had PSM; Staphylococcus aureus was the organism (45.1%) most frequently isolated at the time of surgical debridement. EPWs from 1,607 (73.0%) patients, 73 (4.5%) of whom developed PSM, were cultured. EPW cultures from 466 (29.0%) were positive, most often (74.9%) for coagulase-negative Staphylococci. EPW cultures were truly positive in 26 cases, truly negative in 1,106 cases, falsely positive in 428 cases, and falsely negative in 47 cases (with sterile cultures in 35 cases and a culture positive for an organism different from that isolated at the time of debridement in 12 cases). EPW culture had a positive predictive value of only 5.7% and a high negative predictive value (95.9%) for the diagnosis of PSM, with an accuracy of 70.4%. However, the likelihood ratio of positive (1.27) and negative (0.89) tests indicated only small changes in pretest-to-posttest probability. Therefore, a strategy of routine culture of EPWs to predict PSM seems questionable.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/JCM.42.11.5245-5248.2004DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC525282PMC
November 2004

Platelet activation and aggregation profile in prolonged external ventricular support.

J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg 2004 Aug;128(2):197-202

Service de Chirurgie Cardiaque, Hôpital Henri Mondor, Créteil, France.

Background: Platelet function plays a major role in the understanding of thromboembolic events in prolonged mechanical support. We studied the platelet activation, platelet aggregation profile, and efficacy of aspirin in patients in whom an external ventricular assist device had been implanted.

Patients And Methods: Fifteen patients were studied prospectively up to 6 weeks after implantation of the same type of ventricular assist device. Platelet function was studied weekly before daily aspirin administration. Aspirin efficacy was tested ex vivo by measuring platelet aggregation triggered by arachidonic acid. Flow cytometry was used to quantify the spontaneous and induced (adenosine diphosphate stimulation) expression of glycoproteins alphaIIbbeta3, Ibalpha, and CD62P on platelet membranes. The plasma levels of von Willebrand factor (von Willebrand factor activity and von Willebrand factor antigen) and fibrinogen were also determined.

Results: Six of the 15 patients (26%) maintained an arachidonic acid-induced platelet aggregation despite daily aspirin treatment (250 mg). CD62P values remained increased during a 5-week postoperative period. Spontaneous levels of glycoproteins alphaIIbbeta3 and Ibalpha on platelet membranes remained within a normal range with a preserved reactivity. The plasma levels of fibrinogen and von Willebrand factor remained increased during the entire study period.

Conclusion: In patients with an implanted external ventricular assist device, the platelet activation profile displays a persistent activation with a preserved reactivity associated with a persistent high inflammatory state and endothelial activation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jtcvs.2003.11.059DOI Listing
August 2004

Resistance to aspirin after external ventricular assist device implantation.

J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg 2003 Nov;126(5):1636-7

Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, Hôpital Henri Mondor, Créteil, France.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/s0022-5223(03)01194-2DOI Listing
November 2003

beta2-Adrenergic signaling in human heart: shift from the cyclic AMP to the arachidonic acid pathway.

Mol Pharmacol 2003 Nov;64(5):1117-25

INSERM Unité 581, Hôpital Henri Mondor, 94010 Créteil, France.

We have recently established that enhancement of intracellular calcium cycling and contraction in response to beta2-adrenergic receptor (beta2-AR) stimulation exclusively relies on the activation of the cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2) and arachidonic acid production, via a pertussis toxin-sensitive G protein (possibly Gi), in embryonic chick cardiomyocytes. We aimed to investigate the relevance of the beta2-AR/Gi/cPLA2 pathway in the human myocardium. In left ventricular biopsies obtained from explanted hearts, beta2-AR stimulation exerted either an inhibition of cPLA2 that was insensitive to pertussis toxin (PTX) treatment, or an activation of cPLA2, sensitive to PTX treatment. In right atrial appendages from patients who were undergoing open heart surgery, we demonstrated that beta2-AR-induced activation of cPLA2 was favored in situations of altered beta1-AR and/or beta2-AR/adenylyl cyclase (AC) stimulations. Alterations were characterized by an increase in EC50value of norepinephrine and a decrease in the maximal AC activation in response to zinterol, respectively. Quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analyses highlighted a positive correlation between the expression of AC5 and AC6 mRNAs in human cardiac atria, which suggested that functional alterations in AC responses were unlikely to be related to changes in the AC5/AC6 mRNA ratio. In addition, the shift from the cyclic AMP to the arachidonic acid pathway was not supported at the transcriptional level by opposite regulation of AC and cPLA2mRNAs expression. This study gives the first evidence of the recruitment of cPLA2by beta2-ARs in the human heart and suggests that the Gi/cPLA2pathway could substitute for a deficient Gs/AC pathway in mediating beta2-AR responses.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1124/mol.64.5.1117DOI Listing
November 2003

Different effects of mibefradil and amlodipine on coronary vessels and during beta-adrenergic stimulation in conscious dogs.

J Cardiovasc Pharmacol 2002 Dec;40(6):898-906

INSERUM U400, Facultè de Mèdecine, 94010 Crèteil, France.

Coronary effects of Ca -channel blockers mibefradil and amlodipine were compared in conscious dogs. Ten dogs were instrumented for measurement of aortic and left ventricular pressures, circumflex coronary blood flow velocity (CBFv), and coronary diameter (CD). A permanent catheter was implanted in the circumflex coronary artery. At doses having no systemic effects (7.5-150 micro g/kg), mibefradil and amlodipine increased CBFv and CD dose dependently. At the same dose, mibefradil increased less CBFv than amlodipine. However, for a similar increase in CBFv induced by amlodipine, mibefradil increased CD more. BAY K8644, an L-type Ca -channel agonist, prevented the CBFv and CD responses to amlodipine, but minimally affected the coronary responses to mibefradil. Intracoronary isoproterenol (6 ng/kg) increased LV dP/dt max, CBFv, and CD. Amlodipine markedly altered these responses, while mibefradil did not affect LV inotropic response and slightly altered CBFv response to isoproterenol. Thus, in conscious dogs, both mibefradil and amlodipine exert coronary vasodilation, with different patterns on coronary conductance and resistance vessels and during beta-adrenergic stimulation. These differences could be related to their actions on different Ca channels.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/00005344-200212000-00011DOI Listing
December 2002

Nosocomial infections occurring during receipt of circulatory support with the paracorporeal ventricular assist system.

Clin Infect Dis 2002 Dec 13;35(11):1308-15. Epub 2002 Nov 13.

Service de Réanimation Médicale, Centre Hospitalo-Universitaire Henri Mondor, 94010 Créteil cédex, France.

This retrospective study sought to report the spectrum of infections in a homogenous group of 39 patients who underwent implantation of the Thoratec paracorporeal ventricular assist device system (Thoratec Laboratories) in an emergency setting. Thirty-one of the 39 patients developed a total of 99 nosocomial infections (attack rate, 79.5%; incidence, 4.9 per 100 support-days). The lungs were the most frequently involved site (31.3%), and coagulase-negative Staphylococcus species were the pathogens most frequently isolated (16.2%). Infected patients required more transfusions and chest surgical revisions, as well as a longer duration of mechanical ventilation and a longer stay in the intensive care unit, compared with uninfected patients. Cox regression analysis revealed that chest surgical revision was the only independent risk factor for infection at any site (odds ratio, 2.6; 95% confidence interval, 1.2-5.7). There was no significant effect of infection on heart transplantation rate and overall survival.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/343825DOI Listing
December 2002

Long-term results of the bentall operation versus separate replacement of the ascending aorta and aortic valve.

J Heart Valve Dis 2002 Jul;11(4):485-91

Service de Chirurgie Thoracique et Cardiovasculaire, Association Claude Bernard, Hĵpital Henri Mondor, Créteil, France.

Background And Aims Of The Study: Aortic valve disease associated with ascending aorta dilatation can be treated either by separate replacement of the aortic valve and ascending aorta, or by a composite valved graft.

Methods: Between 1974 and 1999, 117 patients underwent a Bentall operation (BP), and 63 a separate replacement procedure (SP) of the ascending aorta and aortic valve. Anatomic lesions were dystrophic aneurysm in 79 patients, annuloectasia in 65, chronic dissection in 14, acute dissection in 18, and other etiology in four. Mean follow up was 3.45+/-3.47 and 8.75+/-6.8 years in the BP and SP groups, respectively.

Results: Early mortality was 7.7% in the BP group versus 11% in the SP group (p = NS). Actuarial survival at 10 years postoperatively in these groups was respectively 77.7+/-5.6% versus 75.8+/-6.9% (p = NS). However, freedom from late complication of the ascending aorta was significantly different (97.3+/-1.9% versus 68.3+/-9.0% at 10 years postoperatively). SP was identified as a risk factor for late complication of the ascending aorta by multivariate analysis (p = 0.01; odds ratio = 9). No statistical difference was observed on late reoperation rates.

Conclusion: Separate replacement of the ascending aorta and aortic valve carries a higher complication rate for the remaining ascending aorta on long-term follow up when compared with the Bentall procedure. However, there were no differences in terms of late mortality.
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July 2002

Aortic wall alterations after use of gelatin-resorcinol-formalin glue.

Ann Thorac Surg 2002 Feb;73(2):642-4

Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Association Claude Bernard, Hĵpital Henri Mondor, Créteil, France.

We report the case of a patient who underwent reoperation 8 years after aortic valve replacement because of aneurysmal dilatation of the aortic root. During the initial intervention, gelatin-resorcinol-formalin glue had been applied on the outside of the aortic root. Perioperative examination revealed a necrotic appearance of the right coronary sinus, with contained ruptures at two different sites. Histologic analysis showed major destruction of the aortic root media, leading to vascular wall thinning and rupture. The use of gelatin-resorcinolformalin glue may expose patients to major alterations of the aortic wall.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/s0003-4975(01)03008-9DOI Listing
February 2002

Risk factor analysis for proximal and distal reoperations after surgery for acute type A aortic dissection.

J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg 2002 Feb;123(2):318-25

Service de Chirurgie Thoracique et Cardiovasculaire, Hôpital Henri Mondor, Créteil, France.

Objective: This study was undertaken to determine significant risk factors for proximal or distal reoperations after surgical correction of acute type A aortic dissection.

Methods: Between 1980 and 2000, a total of 160 consecutive patients (mean age 57.5 +/- 13.3 years, 126 men) underwent surgery for acute type A aortic dissection. Proximal repair was performed by means of ascending aorta replacement with valve resuspension in 130 cases (81.3%), composite graft replacement in 19 cases (11.9%), separate aortic valve and ascending aorta replacement in 7 cases (4.4%), and aortic repair in 1 case (0.6%). Distal repair required arch replacement in 23 cases. Follow-up time averaged 4.51 +/- 5.6 years per patient.

Results: Survival estimates after initial operation were 66.1% +/- 3.8%, 57.7% +/- 4.2%, 52.2% +/- 4.6%, and 42.5% +/- 5.8% at 1, 5, 10, and 15 years, respectively. Thirty patients required 37 reoperations at a mean interval of 5.7 +/- 4.5 years after the initial operation. Freedoms from reoperation were 96.9% +/- 1.8%, 74.7% +/- 5.3%, 60.8% +/- 6.8%, and 39.3% +/- 9.1% at 1, 5, 10, and 15 years, respectively. Reoperations included procedures on the proximal aorta (aortic root or valve) in 21 cases and on the distal aorta or its side branches in 19 cases. Cox regression analysis distinguished severe preoperative aortic valve insufficiency as the only significant risk factors for proximal reoperation; younger patient age, more distal extent of dissection, and more recent operative date were found to be significant risk factors for distal reoperation.

Conclusion: Patients with acute type A aortic dissection who have severe aortic valve insufficiency are at increased risk for proximal reoperation. These patients should benefit from a more aggressive proximal repair at initial operation. Distal extent of aortic resection at initial operation did not significantly influence the risk of distal reoperation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1067/mtc.2002.119702DOI Listing
February 2002