Publications by authors named "Reiko Kageyama"

15 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Acquired Idiopathic Generalized Anhidrosis (AIGA) and Its Complications: Implications for AIGA as an Autoimmune Disease.

Int J Mol Sci 2021 Aug 4;22(16). Epub 2021 Aug 4.

Allergic Disease Research Center and Department of Dermatology, Chutoen General Medical Center, Kakegawa 436-8555, Japan.

Acquired idiopathic generalized anhidrosis (AIGA) is a rare disorder in which systemic anhidrosis/hypohidrosis occurs without causative dermatological, metabolic or neurological disorder. Most cases of AIGA have been reported in Asia, especially in Japan, but there have been only a few reports in Europe and the United States. Severe AIGA may result in heatstroke and can reduce quality of life due to restriction of exercise and outdoor works. AIGA is often accompanied by cholinergic urticaria (CholU), and it is thought that AIGA and CholU with anhidrosis/hypohidrosis belong to the same spectrum of the disease. However, the pathophysiology of AIGA has not yet been clarified. Decreased expression of cholinergic receptor M3 on the epithelial cells of eccrine sweat glands is often accompanied by T cell infiltration around eccrine apparatus, suggesting an immunological mechanism of disordered perspiration. AIGA is occasionally associated with various complications indicative of autoimmune disorders. The association of autoimmune complications further suggests that AIGA is an autoimmune disorder. Studies on complications may lead to a better understanding of the pathophysiology of AIGA.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ijms22168389DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8395056PMC
August 2021

Increased CD30 cells in skin lesions of drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome: Are type-2 innate lymphoid cells present?

J Dermatol 2021 Sep 25;48(9):e432-e433. Epub 2021 May 25.

Department of Dermatology, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, Hamamatsu, Japan.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1346-8138.15967DOI Listing
September 2021

CD8 mycosis fungoides with optic nerve and central nervous system involvement.

J Dermatol 2021 Jun 8;48(6):e286-e287. Epub 2021 Apr 8.

Department of Dermatology, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, Hamamatsu, Japan.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1346-8138.15885DOI Listing
June 2021

Immunological Properties of Atopic Dermatitis-Associated Alopecia Areata.

Int J Mol Sci 2021 Mar 5;22(5). Epub 2021 Mar 5.

Department of Cellular & Molecular Anatomy, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, Hamamatsu 431-3192, Japan.

Alopecia areata (AA) is regarded as a tissue-specific and cell-mediated autoimmune disorder. Regarding the cytokine balance, AA has been considered a type 1 inflammatory disease. On the other hand, AA often complicates atopic dermatitis (AD) and AD is regarded as type 2 inflammatory disease. However, the immunological aspects of AA in relation to AD are still poorly understood. Therefore, we aim to clarify the immunological properties of AD-associated AA. In this study, we performed comparative analysis of the expression of intracytoplasmic cytokines (IFN-γ, IL-4, and IL-13), chemokine receptors (CXCR3 and CCR4) in peripheral blood which were taken from healthy controls, non-atopic AA patients, AA patients with extrinsic AD, and AA patients with intrinsic AD by flowcytometric analysis. We also compared the scalp skin samples taken from AA patients with extrinsic AD before and after treatment with dupilumab. In non-atopic AA patients, the ratios of CD4+IFN-γ+ cells to CD4IL-4 cells and CD4IFN-γ cells to CD4IL-13 cells were higher than those in AA patients with extrinsic AD. Meanwhile, the ratio of CD8IFN-γ cells to CD8+IL-13+ cells was significantly higher in the non-atopic AA than in the healthy controls. In AA patients with extrinsic AD, the skin AA lesion showed dense infiltration of not only CXCR3+ cells but also CCR4 cells around hair bulb before dupilumab treatment. However, after the treatment, the number of CXCR3 cells had no remarkable change while the number of CCR4 cells significantly decreased. These results indicate that the immunological condition of AA may be different between atopic and non-atopic patients and between extrinsic and intrinsic AD patients. Our study provides an important notion that type 2 immunity may participate in the development of AA in extrinsic AD patients. It may be considered that the immunological state of non-atopic AA is different from that of atopic AA.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ijms22052618DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7961331PMC
March 2021

Understanding the significance of cytokines and chemokines in the pathogenesis of alopecia areata.

Exp Dermatol 2020 08 3;29(8):726-732. Epub 2020 Jul 3.

Department of Dermatology, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, Hamamatsu, Japan.

Alopecia areata has basically been understood as a type 1 inflammatory disease. Activated NKG2D CD8 cells produce the Th1 cytokine interferon-γ, which leads to the disruption of immune tolerance of hair follicles and the exposure of self-antigens. This results in dense inflammatory cell infiltration and apoptosis around hair follicles, inducing hair loss. A well-known complication of alopecia areata is atopic dermatitis, a typical type 2 inflammatory disease. Hair scientists have shied away from confronting and understanding how alopecia areata, a type 1 inflammatory disease, and atopic dermatitis, a type 2 inflammatory disease, can occur together. This review summarizes the research on the cytokine balance in alopecia areata and then focuses on the classification of the cytokine balance in alopecia areata, including the classification of atopic dermatitis into extrinsic and intrinsic types. Dupilumab reportedly showed dual efficacy in a patient with concomitant atopic dermatitis and alopecia areata, supporting our own experience. Elevated Th2 cytokine levels have also been reported in patients with alopecia areata, with increased serum IL-4, IL-5, IL-6 levels, high IgE levels and elevated eosinophil levels. Because local immunotherapy is a treatment that induces Th2-type inflammation, it may worsen the condition of alopecia areata patients with extrinsic atopic dermatitis. It is desirable to select appropriate treatments with consideration of the cytokine balance.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/exd.14129DOI Listing
August 2020

The contribution made by skin-infiltrating basophils to the development of alpha-gal syndrome.

Allergy 2019 09 3;74(9):1805-1807. Epub 2019 May 3.

Department of Dermatology, Shimada Municipal Hospital, Shimada, Japan.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/all.13794DOI Listing
September 2019

Unknown primary Merkel cell carcinoma responding well to first-line treatment with avelumab.

J Dermatol 2019 08 25;46(8):e273-e275. Epub 2019 Feb 25.

Department of Dermatology, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, Hamamatsu, Japan.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1346-8138.14827DOI Listing
August 2019

Short course of cyclosporin A as a treatment option for drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome: Case reports and review of the published work.

J Dermatol 2018 Jun 8;45(6):e169-e170. Epub 2018 Jan 8.

Department of Dermatology, Shimada Municipal Hospital, Shimada, Japan.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1346-8138.14207DOI Listing
June 2018

Repeated Amblyomma testudinarium tick bites are associated with increased galactose-α-1,3-galactose carbohydrate IgE antibody levels: A retrospective cohort study in a single institution.

J Am Acad Dermatol 2018 Jun 19;78(6):1135-1141.e3. Epub 2017 Dec 19.

Department of Dermatology, National Defense Medical College, Tokorozawa, Japan.

Background: Alpha-gal syndrome is a hypersensitivity reaction to red meat mediated by IgE antibody specific to galactose-α-1,3-galactose carbohydrate (alpha-gal). Amblyomma tick bites are associated with this condition, but the pathophysiology is not understood.

Objective: To clarify the mechanism of development of alpha-gal syndrome after tick bites.

Methods: We compared alpha-gal antibody levels between patients with and without a history of tick bites and examined histologic stainings of tick bite lesions between patients with and without detectable alpha-gal IgE antibody.

Results: Patients who had ≥2 tick bites had higher levels of alpha-gal IgE antibody compared with those with only 1 tick bite or healthy individuals. On histologic investigation, greater numbers of basophils and eosinophils, but not mast cells, were observed infiltrating lesions of patients with ≥2 tick bites compared with those with 1 tick bite. Type 2 cytokine-producing T-cell infiltration was predominantly observed in such patients.

Limitations: The study was conducted at a single institution in Japan.

Conclusion: In Amblyomma tick bite lesions, basophils; eosinophils; and type 2, cytokine-producing T cells infiltrate the skin and alpha-gal IgE antibodies are produced. These findings provide a potential mechanistic connection between Amblyomma bites and red meat hypersensitivity.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jaad.2017.12.028DOI Listing
June 2018

Agranulocytosis associated with voriconazole-induced hypersensitivity syndrome.

J Dermatol 2018 May 23;45(5):e118-e119. Epub 2017 Nov 23.

Department of Dermatology, Shimada Municipal Hospital, Shimada, Japan.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1346-8138.14142DOI Listing
May 2018

Case of lipodystrophia centrifugalis abdominalis infantilis successfully treated with topical application of tacrolimus.

J Dermatol 2017 Apr 15;44(4):e68-e69. Epub 2016 Oct 15.

Department of Dermatology, Shimada Municipal Hospital, Shimada, Japan.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1346-8138.13638DOI Listing
April 2017

Hypocomplementemia is a diagnostic clue for parvovirus B19 infection in adults.

J Dermatol 2017 Mar 30;44(3):e27. Epub 2016 May 30.

Department of Dermatology, Shimada Municipal Hospital, Shimada, Japan.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1346-8138.13469DOI Listing
March 2017

A case of granulomatous mastitis, erythema nodosum and oligoarthralgia in a pregnant woman with high serum granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor.

Eur J Dermatol 2016 Apr;26(2):205-7

Department of Dermatology, Shimada-Municipal Hospital, 1200-5 Noda, Shimada, Shizuoka 427-8502, Japan.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1684/ejd.2015.2714DOI Listing
April 2016

Neurotoxicity induced by the recommended acyclovir dosing in a dialysis patient with herpes zoster: A case letter.

J Dermatol 2016 Mar 21;43(3):339-40. Epub 2015 Nov 21.

Department of Dermatology, Shimada Municipal Hospital, Shimada, Japan.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1346-8138.13196DOI Listing
March 2016

Successful differentiation of herpes zoster-associated erythema multiforme from generalized extension of herpes by rapid polymerase chain reaction analysis.

J Dermatol 2014 Jun;41(6):542-4

Department of Dermatology, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, Hamamatsu, Japan.

The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay for varicella zoster virus (VZV), herpes simplex virus (HSV)-1 and HSV-2 is available for use. Sometimes the differential diagnosis of the generalized herpes zoster (HZ), HSV1/2, and drug eruption is difficult. We report a case of HZ followed by the vesicular erythema multiforme (EM)-like lesion. In this case the use of PCR was of great assistance. A 78-year-old Japanese man without any significant previous history of disease was admitted to our hospital complaining of zosteriform vesicle on an erythematous base from his right shoulder to the upper arm. We diagnosed him with HZ at the level of right Th2. In spite of the prompt start of antiviral therapy, a secondary new vesiculous erythema developed on his trunk. Clinically, it was quite difficult to differentiate the lesion from the generalized HZ. Rapid PCR assay of effusion and crust for VZV was performed. A PCR assay of VZV was positive for the crust taken from the primary lesion, while it was negative for the effusion and crust of the secondary widespread lesion. We diagnosed the secondary widespread lesion as an EM-type drug eruption induced by acyclovir, or an EM associated with herpes zoster. We then stopped the use of acyclovir and applied steroid ointment of a very strong class for the secondary lesions, which improved after a few days. A PCR assay for VZV was useful for ruling out the generalized HZ in our case with secondary developed vesiculous lesions.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1346-8138.12479DOI Listing
June 2014
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