Publications by authors named "Rebecca Shenkman"

7 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Development of a weight bias reduction intervention for third-year nursing students.

Clin Obes 2021 Nov 25:e12498. Epub 2021 Nov 25.

Villanova University M. Louise Fitzpatrick College of Nursing, Villanova, Pennsylvania, USA.

To explore whether case-based learning will enhance a weight bias reduction (WBR) programme among nursing students to improve their attitudes and beliefs towards persons with obesity. A cluster-randomized controlled trial (CRT) among 13 medical-surgical clinical practicum groups consisting of six to eight third-year baccalaureate nursing students was conducted to compare a WBR training enhanced by case-based learning (WBR-I, n = 7) with a standard WBR control group (n = 6). All participants completed the Attitudes Towards Obese Persons (ATOP) and Beliefs About Obese Persons (BAOP) questionnaires before the randomized assignment and at the end of the 14-week semester. The BAOP scores of participants in the WBR-I group were significantly improved compared to controls (26.68 ± 7.85 and 22.93 ± 2.80, respectively; F = 18.23; p = .001 (<.01) indicating improved beliefs about the controllability of obesity. There were no significant changes to attitudes about individuals with obesity, as indicated by the ATOP scores. The findings of this pilot study suggest that a more intensive WBR programme that includes case-based learning scenarios that elicit critical thinking coupled with a standard WBR programme may reduce some aspects of weight bias.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cob.12498DOI Listing
November 2021

Learning environment and evidence among professionals and students satisfaction (LEAPS), experienced during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Teach Learn Nurs 2021 Oct 27;16(4):342-346. Epub 2021 Jul 27.

MacDonald Center for Obesity Prevention and Education, Villanova University, M. Louise Fitzpatrick College of Nursing, Villanova, PA, USA.

The COVID-19 pandemic required schools to transition courses to an online platform. This shift to Emergency Remote Teaching (ERT) created gaps in the literature about its impact on students. The purpose of this study was to test the relationship between learner and instructional attributes and learner satisfaction with ERT. A modified version of the Student Satisfaction Survey assessed learner and instructional attributes and learner satisfaction among a convenience sample of 12 graduate and 83 undergraduate nursing students. Open-ended questions assessed students' responses to their satisfaction with ERT. Multiple regression analysis was used to test associations of learner and instructional attributes with student satisfaction. Overall satisfaction with ERT was neutral with a mean of 2.76 on a 1 to 5 scale; students rated instructional attributes higher with a mean of 3.64. Instructional engagement/technology use (single factor) and learner technology competence were associated with student satisfaction, beta = 0.93(0.09), <.001; beta = 0.24(0.09),  = .008, respectively. Between-class technology use and prior experience with online courses were not associated with student satisfaction, beta = -0.08(0.09),  = .379, beta = 0.26(0.15),  = .079, respectively. Qualitative findings revealed faculty engagement was a major determinant in learner satisfaction with ERT. Supporting faculty competence for the use of technology may increase learner satisfaction with ERT.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.teln.2021.07.004DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8442533PMC
October 2021

Reflective journaling of nursing students on weight bias.

Nurse Educ Today 2021 Mar 24;98:104702. Epub 2020 Dec 24.

Office of Nursing Research and Evaluation, Villanova University M. Louise Fitzpatrick College of Nursing, 800 Lancaster Avenue, Villanova, PA 190895, United States of America. Electronic address:

Background: Self-reflection, combined with clinical experience, has been shown to enhance clinical and didactic knowledge among undergraduate nursing students. Reflective journaling is a valuable educational tool that builds critical thinking skills and raises self-awareness through the purposeful inspection of beliefs and attitudes. However, there are little data available on reflective journaling during clinical education exploring weight bias as part of a weight sensitivity training program.

Objectives: The study aimed to explore the use of reflective journals as a tool to raise self-awareness and self-reflection of weight bias as part of a weight sensitivity training program.

Settings: The project was conducted at a four-year pre-licensure baccalaureate nursing program with third-year clinical students in a private Catholic university in southeastern Pennsylvania, USA.

Participants: All third-year students enrolled in a medical-surgical clinical practicum were eligible to participate from August to December 2017.

Design & Methods: For this qualitative study, data were collected during the 15-week medical-surgical clinical practicum, in which students completed five journal entries. De-identified data were analyzed using thematic analysis.

Results: A total of 98 students, 18 years of age and older consented, and 280 journal entries were analyzed. Four themes emerged from a majority of the journal entries: 1) increased self-awareness of personal weight bias; 2) acknowledgment of obesity as a chronic disease and not a choice; 3) insufficient resources or training may perpetuate weight bias; and 4) opportunity for weight sensitivity training to improve patient care.

Conclusions: Through reflective journaling, nursing students were able to periodically self-reflect on their personal weight bias as it pertained to caring for patients with obesity. This introspective self-reflection as part of a weight sensitivity training may lead to not only improving clinical competencies in patient care but also in reducing weight bias in clinical practicum.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nedt.2020.104702DOI Listing
March 2021

Nursing students' perspectives on observed weight bias in healthcare settings: A qualitative study.

Nurs Forum 2021 Jan 6;56(1):58-65. Epub 2020 Nov 6.

M. Louise Fitzpatrick College of Nursing, Villanova University, Villanova, Pennsylvania, USA.

Background: Weight bias continues to be problematic within the healthcare setting among practicing healthcare providers (HCPs). These HCPs serve as influential role models for nursing students when immersed in the clinical environment. However, if HCPs are demonstrating bias toward patients with obesity, this may influence nursing students' beliefs and practices.

Aims: This study aimed to explore nursing students' reflections of observed weight bias within the healthcare setting.

Materials & Methods: A descriptive qualitative study design was used involving reflective journaling and qualitative content analysis. Two cohorts of third-year baccalaureate nursing students (n = 197) participated in weight sensitivity training and submitted reflective journals over one academic semester.

Results: Reports of weight bias were categorized into three themes-(1) Direct Impact: Observed Implicit and Explicit Provider Weight Bias; (2) Indirect Impact: Weight Bias Due to Skills, Equipment, or Staffing/Environmental Deficits; and (3) Reactions toward HCP Weight Bias: Conflict Between Weight Bias Training and Real-World Healthcare Experiences.

Discussion: Weight bias was observed in some HCPs within the healthcare setting. Student reflections explored weight bias and the opposing messages between weight sensitivity training and real-world practices.

Conclusion: Preventing bias through continuing education for HCPs is crucial to provide compassionate care and instill ethical values in the next generation nurses.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/nuf.12522DOI Listing
January 2021

Weight Sensitivity Training Among Undergraduate Nursing Students.

J Nurs Educ 2020 Aug;59(8):453-456

Background: A Curriculum Embedded Weight Sensitivity Training program (CeWebs) was integrated into an undergraduate nursing course to improve attitudes and beliefs toward individuals with obesity.

Method: A one-group repeated measures study was conducted to compare students' pretest and posttest attitudes and beliefs using the Attitudes Toward Obese Persons (ATOP) and Beliefs About Obese Persons (BAOP) at the beginning and end of the semester.

Results: Comparison of pretraining and posttraining scores of 125 junior nursing students on ATOP (73.96 ± 15.02 and 84.59 ± 15.39, respectively) indicated a significant increase in scores (p < .01), which reflects more positive attitudes. Comparison of pretraining and posttraining BAOP scores (18.20 ± 6.84 and 22.22 ± 7.87, respectively) indicated a significant (p < .01) increase in scores, indicating beliefs that obesity is not controllable.

Conclusion: These findings suggest that embedding weight sensitivity training into undergraduate nursing curricula may improve attitudes and beliefs toward patients with obesity. [J Nurs Educ. 2020;59(8):453-456.].
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3928/01484834-20200723-06DOI Listing
August 2020

Successes and challenges of using a peer Mentor model for nutrition education within a food pantry: a qualitative study.

BMC Nutr 2020 14;6:27. Epub 2020 Jul 14.

MacDonald Center for Obesity Prevention and Education, Villanova University M. Louise Fitzpatrick College of Nursing, 800 Lancaster Avenue, Villanova, PA 19085 USA.

Background: Delivering nutrition education within an emergency food pantry (EFP) provides an opportunity to reach many food insecure households and underserved populations. However, little is known about using a peer mentor model, " as a modality to deliver nutrition education within this setting. This research aimed to identify the successes and challenges of using a peer mentor model within an EFP to better understand the best approaches to deliver nutrition education among community residents.

Methods: In spring 2018, semi-structured interviews were conducted with 11 peer mentors after they delivered a series of nutrition workshops to community members of the EFP. Interviews were audio-recorded and transcribed verbatim. Qualitative content analysis was used to analyze the data.

Results: All peer mentors were women over 40 years-of-age, were recruited from the EFP community; most were high school graduates and currently received some form of federal nutrition assistance. All peer mentors reported that the nutrition education program offered many benefits. Key successes of the program included serving in the role as a peer mentor was an empowering experience which gave them a sense of community, purpose, and camaraderie; 2) the nutrition education was appropriately tailored towards those living with food insecurity; 3) the recipes required minimal cooking skills and included low-cost easily accessible foods available at the EFP. Key challenges of the program were the lack of community member engagement in the nutrition education workshops.

Conclusion: Challenges continue to exist when delivering nutrition education within a community EFP setting. While the use of peer mentors to deliver nutrition education messages is promising, more research is needed to quantify the impact of using a peer mentor model in underserved and food insecure communities.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s40795-020-00352-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7359598PMC
July 2020

Barriers to Healthy Eating in a Community That Relies on an Emergency Food Pantry.

J Nutr Educ Behav 2020 03 8;52(3):299-306. Epub 2019 Nov 8.

MacDonald Center for Obesity Prevention and Education, Villanova University M. Louise Fitzpatrick College of Nursing, Villanova, PA.

Objective: To explore perceived barriers to healthy eating within a food-insecure community that relies on an emergency food pantry.

Methods: A qualitative descriptive study was conducted using focus groups within an emergency food pantry located in southeastern Pennsylvania. Eleven female participants were recruited from the food pantry to serve as focus group participants and key community informants. Focus group transcripts were transcribed, coded, and analyzed using a constant comparative method.

Results: Four themes regarding perceived barriers to healthy eating were identified: (1) knowledge, (2) resources, (3) special dietary needs, and (4) culture and family influences.

Conclusions And Implications: Emergent themes from the focus groups identified the perceived barriers to healthy eating within a food-insecure community. These findings may be essential for informing the development of future nutrition education programs and for promoting health in low-income communities.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jneb.2019.10.005DOI Listing
March 2020
-->