Publications by authors named "Razieh Hoseinifar"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Histological Evaluation of Human Pulp Response to Direct Pulp Capping with MTA, CEM Cement, and Biodentine.

J Dent (Shiraz) 2020 Sep;21(3):177-183

Dept. of Operative Dentistry, School of Dentistry, Zahedan University of Medical Sciences, Zahedan, Iran.

Statement Of The Problem: Direct pulp capping (DPC) is an established method in which the exposed pulp is coated with a suitable material to prevent further damage and to help its repair and healing. Different proposed materials may have different impact on pulp response during this treatment.

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to compare the response of human dental pulp after DPC with calcium-enriched mixture (CEM), mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) cement, and Biodentine.

Materials And Method: In this clinical trial study, class V cavities were prepared on the buccal surfaces of 30 human premolar teeth, until the pulps were mechanically exposed. Then, teeth were randomly pulp capped with MTA, CEM cement and Biodentine, followed by resin modified glass ionomer filling. The fourth group was the control group (n= 10), in which the teeth were extracted without any prior intervention. Six weeks after the intervention, the teeth were extracted and prepared for histological evaluation in terms of the type and degree of pulp inflammation, dentin bridge formation and the presence of necrosis. Data were analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis and Mann Whitney U tests.

Results: In all groups, necrosis was not observed and inflammation was chronic. The Biodentine group exhibited significantly more pulpal inflammation compared with the other groups (= 0.001). There were no significant differences among CEM cement, MTA and Biodentine in terms of the dentine bridge formation. The thickness of the dentin bridge formed in the Biodentine group was significantly higher than MTA and control group (= 0.035 and = 0.011, respectively).

Conclusion: Although the dentin bridge formation and the thickness of dentin bridge formed in the Biodentine group were higher than the other groups, pulp showed greater inflammation compared to CEM cement and MTA. The results of this study suggested that MTA and CEM cement performed better when employed as the direct pulp capping material.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.30476/DENTJODS.2019.81796.0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7519940PMC
September 2020

The Effect of Occlusal Loading on Gingival Microleakage of Bulk Fill Composites Compared with a Conventional Composite.

J Dent (Shiraz) 2020 Jun;21(2):87-94

Dental Student, School of Dentistry, Kerman University of Medical Sciences, Kerman, Iran.

Statement Of The Problem: Bulk fill composites have been introduced over the recent years in order to accelerate the process of tooth restoration by inserting composite in bulk up to 4mm thickness. Occlusal loading may influence the gingival microleakage of this composite.

Purpose: This study aims to evaluate the effect of occlusal loading on the gingival microleakage of bulk fill composites compared with a conventional composite.

Materials And Method: In this experimental study, box only class II cavities with gingival margins placed 1mm below the cemento-enamel junction were prepared on the mesial and distal surfaces of 36 maxillary premolars (72 cavities). The samples were divided into three groups and restored as follows: Group 1 (Tetric N-Ceram, incremental filling), Group 2 (X-tra fill, bulk filling), Group 3 (Tetric N-Ceram Bulk Fill, bulk filling). All restorations were thermocycled for 2000 cycles (5-50̊C) and then half of the samples were subjected to 200,000 cycles of loading. All the specimens were immersed in 0.5% basic fuchsin for 48 hours, then, sectioned, and evaluated for microleakage with a stereomicroscope. Data were analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U-tests. < 0.05 was considered significant.

Results: There were no significant differences among the gingival microleakage of three composites in both unloaded and loaded groups. In addition, no statistically significant difference was found between the microleakage of unloaded and loaded groups in all materials.

Conclusion: Occlusal loading did not affect the gingival microleakage of bulk fill composites, and the microleakage of class II cavities restored with the bulk filling technique was similar to that of restored with the incremental technique.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.30476/DENTJODS.2019.77861.0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7280547PMC
June 2020

One Year Clinical Evaluation of a Low Shrinkage Composite Compared with a Packable Composite Resin: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

J Dent (Tehran) 2017 Mar;14(2):84-91

Instructor, Department of Operative Dentistry, School of Dentistry, Zahedan University of Medical Sciences, Zahedan, Iran.

Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical performance of a packable and a low shrinkage methacrylate-based composite after one year.

Materials And Methods: In this clinical trial, 50 class I or II restorations were placed in 25 patients. Each patient received two restorations. The tested materials were: (I) Filtek P60 + Single Bond 2 and (II) Kalore GC + Single Bond 2. The restorations were evaluated by two independent examiners after one week (baseline), six months and one year according to the modified United States Public Health Service (USPHS) criteria. The evaluated parameters included color match, marginal adaptation, anatomical form, retention, surface texture, postoperative sensitivity, marginal staining and secondary caries. Data were then analyzed using Friedman and conditional (matched) logistic regression tests at P<0.05 level of significance.

Results: P60 and Kalore performed similarly at six months and one year (P>0.05). When each composite resin was evaluated independently at baseline and after one year, no statistically significant differences were found except for marginal adaptation (P60) where four restorations were rated Bravo (clinically acceptable). In 8% of restorations, patients expressed postoperative sensitivity.

Conclusions: Kalore GC and Filtek P60 showed acceptance clinical performance after one year of service.
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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5662513PMC
March 2017

Effect of cyclic loading on microleakage of silorane based composite compared with low shrinkage methacrylate-based composites.

Dent Res J (Isfahan) 2016 May-Jun;13(3):264-71

Department of Operative Dentistry, School of Dentistry, Kerman University of Medical Sciences, Kerman, Iran.

Background: There are many concerns regarding the marginal seal of composite restorations, especially when composite restorations are subjected to cyclic loading. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of cyclic loading on the microleakage of silorane based composite compared with low shrinkage methacrylate-based composites in class V cavities.

Materials And Methods: In this in vitro study, class V cavities were prepared on the facial and lingual surfaces of 48 human premolars (96 cavities). The teeth were randomly divided into four groups of 12 teeth (24 cavities) each and restored as follows: Group 1 (Siloran System Adhesive + Filtek P90), Group 2 (All Bond SE + Aelite LS Posterior), Group 3 (Futurabond NR + Grandio), and Group 4 (G-Bond + Kalore-GC). All the specimens were thermocycled for 2000 cycles (5-55°C) and then half of the specimens from each group, were Load cycled. All teeth were immersed in 0.5% basic fuchsine dye, sectioned, and observed under a stereomicroscope. Data were analyzed using Wilcoxon test, Kruskal-Wallis, and Mann-Whitney U-tests. P < 0.05 was considered as significant.

Results: In both unloaded and loaded groups, no statistically significant differences were observed among four composites at the occlusal margin, but a significant difference in gingival microleakage was found between Aelite and silorane. Occlusal and gingival microleakage was not affected by cyclic loading in none of the four restorative materials.

Conclusion: Silorane did not provide better marginal seal than the low shrinkage methacrylate-based composites (except Aelite). In addition, cyclic loading did not affect the marginal microleakage of evaluated composite restorations.
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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4878212PMC
http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/1735-3327.182188DOI Listing
June 2016
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