Publications by authors named "Raymundo Moya"

3 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Protein-Protein Interactions Induce pH-Dependent and Zeaxanthin-Independent Photoprotection in the Plant Light-Harvesting Complex, LHCII.

J Am Chem Soc 2021 Oct 14;143(42):17577-17586. Epub 2021 Oct 14.

Department of Chemistry, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, United States.

Plants use energy from the sun yet also require protection against the generation of deleterious photoproducts from excess energy. Photoprotection in green plants, known as nonphotochemical quenching (NPQ), involves thermal dissipation of energy and is activated by a series of interrelated factors: a pH drop in the lumen, accumulation of the carotenoid zeaxanthin (Zea), and formation of arrays of pigment-containing antenna complexes. However, understanding their individual contributions and their interactions has been challenging, particularly for the antenna arrays, which are difficult to manipulate in vitro. Here, we achieved systematic and discrete control over the array size for the principal antenna complex, light-harvesting complex II, using near-native in vitro membranes called nanodiscs. Each of the factors had a distinct influence on the level of dissipation, which was characterized by measurements of fluorescence quenching and ultrafast chlorophyll-to-carotenoid energy transfer. First, an increase in array size led to a corresponding increase in dissipation; the dramatic changes in the chlorophyll dynamics suggested that this is due to an allosteric conformational change of the protein. Second, a pH drop increased dissipation but exclusively in the presence of protein-protein interactions. Third, no Zea dependence was identified which suggested that Zea regulates a distinct aspect of NPQ. Collectively, these results indicate that each factor provides a separate type of control knob for photoprotection, which likely enables a flexible and tunable response to solar fluctuations.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/jacs.1c07385DOI Listing
October 2021

Spectrally-tunable femtosecond single-molecule pump-probe spectroscopy.

Opt Express 2021 Aug;29(18):28246-28256

Single-molecule spectroscopy has been extensively used to investigate heterogeneity in static and dynamic behaviors on millisecond and second timescales. More recently, single-molecule pump-probe spectroscopy emerged as a method to access heterogeneity on the femtosecond and picosecond timescales. Here, we develop a single-molecule pump-probe apparatus that is easily tunable across the visible region and demonstrate its utility on the widely-used fluorescent dye, Atto647N. A spectrally-independent, bimodal distribution of energetic relaxation time constants is found, where one peak corresponds to electronic dephasing (∼ 100 fs) and the other to intravibrational relaxation (∼ 300 fs). The bimodal nature indicates that relaxation within each individual molecule is dominated by only one of these processes. Both peaks of the distribution are narrow, suggesting little heterogeneity is present for either process. As illustrated here, spectrally-tunable single-molecule pump-probe spectroscopy will enable investigation of the heterogeneity in a wide range of biological and material systems.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1364/OE.432995DOI Listing
August 2021

Identification of distinct pH- and zeaxanthin-dependent quenching in LHCSR3 from .

Elife 2021 Jan 15;10. Epub 2021 Jan 15.

Department of Chemistry, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, United States.

Under high light, oxygenic photosynthetic organisms avoid photodamage by thermally dissipating absorbed energy, which is called nonphotochemical quenching. In green algae, a chlorophyll and carotenoid-binding protein, light-harvesting complex stress-related (LHCSR3), detects excess energy via a pH drop and serves as a quenching site. Using a combined in vivo and in vitro approach, we investigated quenching within LHCSR3 from In vitro two distinct quenching processes, individually controlled by pH and zeaxanthin, were identified within LHCSR3. The pH-dependent quenching was removed within a mutant LHCSR3 that lacks the residues that are protonated to sense the pH drop. Observation of quenching in zeaxanthin-enriched LHCSR3 even at neutral pH demonstrated zeaxanthin-dependent quenching, which also occurs in other light-harvesting complexes. Either pH- or zeaxanthin-dependent quenching prevented the formation of damaging reactive oxygen species, and thus the two quenching processes may together provide different induction and recovery kinetics for photoprotection in a changing environment.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.60383DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7864637PMC
January 2021
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