Publications by authors named "Raymond P Shupak"

4 Publications

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Management of Salivary Gland Injury.

Oral Maxillofac Surg Clin North Am 2021 Aug 9;33(3):343-350. Epub 2021 Jun 9.

Division of Maxillofacial Oncology and Reconstructive Surgery, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, John Peter Smith Health Network, 1500 South Main Street, Fort Worth, TX 76104, USA.

Although a rare sequala of soft tissue injury, salivary gland trauma may result in significant morbidity. Salivary gland injury can involve the major as well as the minor glands. Because of the proximity of adjacent vital structures, a thorough history and physical examination are mandatory during patient evaluation. Trauma to the major salivary glands may involve the parenchyma, duct, or neural injury. Treatment requires adherence to primary principles of soft tissue management. Ductal and neural injury should be repaired primarily. Sialocele and fistula are potential complications of repaired and unrepaired salivary gland injury.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.coms.2021.04.008DOI Listing
August 2021

Pharmacological and Non-Pharmacological Methods of Postoperative Pain Control Following Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery: A Scoping Review.

J Oral Maxillofac Surg 2021 Apr 29. Epub 2021 Apr 29.

Fellow, JPS Health Network, Fort Worth, TX.

Purpose: To conduct a scoping review regarding current pharmacological and non-pharmacological methods of postoperative pain control following oral and maxillofacial surgery.

Materials And Methods: PubMed was used to conduct research for this study. Identification criteria included surgery: patients undergoing the extraction of third molars; therapy: pharmacological or non-pharmacological methods; and outcomes: postoperative pain control. The search included full-text RCTs published after October 13, 2014, that were electronically accessible on PubMed and in the English language. After assessing quality, a scoping review was performed.

Results: Thirty-five RCTs were evaluated, which included a total of 3,791 subjects. The studies evaluated patients' postoperative pain by either utilizing a visual analogue scale (VAS), measuring the time between surgery and when rescue analgesics were used, measuring the amount of rescue analgesics used, or by distributing questionnaires.

Conclusion: COX-2 inhibitors may provide greater analgesic effects compared to traditional nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Additionally, although the supplementation of an opioid analgesic to a NSAID regimen provides an increase in pain control, it does not further reduce pain levels in a patient alternating between ibuprofen and acetaminophen. Other methods of postoperative pain control mentioned in this review should be further explored in studies that contain larger sample sizes and that evaluate side effects of the treatment.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.joms.2021.04.022DOI Listing
April 2021

Oral focal mucinosis of the mandible in an adolescent patient.

BMJ Case Rep 2019 Dec 17;12(12). Epub 2019 Dec 17.

Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA.

Oral focal mucinosis (OFM) is the rare oral manifestation of cutaneous focal mucinosis. It is a diagnosis made histopathologically, as OFM remains clinically similar to other more common oral lesions, and radiographs do not provide any diagnostic information. This case is a report of a teenage female with left mandibular involvement of an elevated, rounded, asymptomatic, mucosa-coloured lesion in the facial and lingual gingiva between her left first and second mandibular molars. The cause was unclear, although the patient stated that she may have sustained a laceration in that area several months prior. An incisional biopsy revealed histopathological findings consistent with OFM, and complete surgical excision of the lesion was performed under a general anaesthetic, with no signs of recurrence for 2 months. The histological, clinical and accepted treatment methods on OFM will be discussed. Clinicians, including those serving paediatric populations, should consider OFM in their differential diagnoses when evaluating gingival lesions.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bcr-2019-232671DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6936386PMC
December 2019

Nodular fasciitis of the tongue: A case report in an infant.

Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol 2018 Oct 24;113:99-101. Epub 2018 Jul 24.

Charleston Area Medical Center - Department of Pathology, Charleston, WV, United States.

Nodular fasciitis is a benign lesion uncommonly found in the head and neck region. Although described previously in adults, there have been no reports of nodular fasciitis in a child's tongue. A 4 month old male infant was referred for evaluation of a rapidly growing tongue lesion. He underwent excisional biopsy of the lesion. Initial pathology suggested a spindle cell tumor. Subsequent outside facility molecular testing was obtained and Nodular Fasciitis was confirmed. Nodular fasciitis is a rare benign tumor that can be often mistaken for malignancy. Special histochemical and molecular testing is required to obtain final diagnosis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijporl.2018.07.030DOI Listing
October 2018
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