Publications by authors named "Raymond Cowley"

3 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Genetic and physical mapping of loci for resistance to blackleg disease in canola (Brassica napus L.).

Sci Rep 2020 03 10;10(1):4416. Epub 2020 Mar 10.

NSW Department of Primary Industries, Wagga Wagga Agricultural Institute, Wagga Wagga, NSW, 2650, Australia.

Sustainable canola production is essential to meet growing human demands for vegetable oil, biodiesel, and meal for stock feed markets. Blackleg, caused by the fungal pathogen, Leptosphaeria maculans is a devastating disease that can lead to significant yield loss in many canola production regions worldwide. Breakdown of race-specific resistance to L. maculans in commercial cultivars poses a constant threat to the canola industry. To identify new alleles, especially for quantitative resistance (QR), we analyzed 177 doubled haploid (DH) lines derived from an RP04/Ag-Outback cross. DH lines were evaluated for QR under field conditions in three experiments conducted at Wagga Wagga (2013, 2014) and Lake Green (2015), and under shade house conditions using the 'ascospore shower' test. DH lines were also characterized for qualitative R gene-mediated resistance via cotyledon tests with two differential single spore isolates, IBCN17 and IBCN76, under glasshouse conditions. Based on 18,851 DArTseq markers, a linkage map representing 2,019 unique marker bins was constructed and then utilized for QTL detection. Marker regression analysis identified 22 significant marker associations for resistance, allowing identification of two race-specific resistance R genes, Rlm3 and Rlm4, and 21 marker associations for QR loci. At least three SNP associations for QR were repeatedly detected on chromosomes A03, A07 and C04 across phenotyping environments. Physical mapping of markers linked with these consistent QR loci on the B. napus genome assembly revealed their localization in close proximity of the candidate genes of B. napus BnaA03g26760D (A03), BnaA07g20240D (A07) and BnaC04g02040D (C04). Annotation of these candidate genes revealed their association with protein kinase and jumonji proteins implicated in defense resistance. Both Rlm3 and Rlm4 genes identified in this DH population did not show any association with resistance loci detected under either field and/or shade house conditions (ascospore shower) suggesting that both genes are ineffective in conferring resistance to L. maculans in Australian field conditions. Taken together, our study identified sequence-based molecular markers for dissecting R and QR loci to L. maculans in a canola DH population from the RP04/Ag-Outback cross.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-020-61211-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7064481PMC
March 2020

Identification of QTLs associated with resistance to Phomopsis pod blight (Diaporthe toxica) in Lupinus albus.

Breed Sci 2014 May;64(1):83-9

Australian Centre for Necrotrophic Fungal Pathogens, Curtin University , Perth , Western Australia.

Phomopsis blight in Lupinus albus is caused by a fungal pathogen, Diaporthe toxica. It can invade all plant parts, leading to plant material becoming toxic to grazing animals, and potentially resulting in lupinosis. Identifying sources of resistance and breeding for resistance remains the best strategy for controlling Phomopsis and reducing lupinosis risks. However, loci associated with resistance to Phomopsis blight have not yet been identified. In this study, quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis identified genomic regions associated with resistance to Phomopsis pod blight (PPB) using a linkage map of L. albus constructed previously from an F8 recombinant inbred line population derived from a cross between Kiev-Mutant (susceptible to PPB) and P27174 (resistant to PPB). Phenotyping was undertaken using a detached pod assay. In total, we identified eight QTLs for resistance to PPB on linkage group (LG) 3, LG6, LG10, LG12, LG17 and LG27 from different phenotyping environments. However, at least one QTL, QTL-5 on LG10 was consistently detected in both phenotyping environments and accounted for up to 28.2% of the total phenotypic variance. The results of this study showed that the QTL-2 on LG3 interacts epistatically with QTL-5 and QTL-6, which map on LG10 and LG12, respectively.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1270/jsbbs.64.83DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4031113PMC
May 2014

Antioxidant and anti-α-glucosidase compounds from the rhizome of Peltiphyllum peltatum (Torr.) Engl.

Phytother Res 2012 Nov 2;26(11):1656-60. Epub 2012 Mar 2.

Pharmacognosy Research Laboratories, Medway School of Science, University of Greenwich, Central Avenue, Chatham-Maritime, Kent, ME4 4 TB, UK.

The antioxidant, anti-α-glucosidase and anticholinesterase effects of the alcohol extract of fresh underground rhizomes of Peltiphyllum peltatum were studied. A potent antioxidant activity accompanied by a selective α-glucosidase effect was observed for the crude extract. Further activity-guided fractionation (petroleum ether, chloroform, ethyl acetate, n-butanol and water) resulted in the identification of the ethyl acetate fraction with the highest antioxidant effect. Gallic acid, methyl-3-O-methyl gallate, catechin, gallocatechin, bergenin and 11-O-galloylbergenin were isolated from the ethyl acetate fraction. While all the isolated compounds did show a variable degree of radical scavenging effect, 11-O-galloylbergenin was identified as the selective α-glucosidase inhibitor. The isolation, structural elucidation and biological effects of these compounds are discussed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ptr.4626DOI Listing
November 2012
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