Publications by authors named "Rathi Paramastri"

5 Publications

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Association between Dietary Pattern, Lifestyle, Anthropometric Status, and Anemia-Related Biomarkers among Adults: A Population-Based Study from 2001 to 2015.

Int J Environ Res Public Health 2021 Mar 26;18(7). Epub 2021 Mar 26.

School of Nutrition and Health Sciences, College of Nutrition, Taipei Medical University, 250 Wu-Hsing Street, Taipei 11031, Taiwan.

Inadequate dietary intake, poor nutritional status, heavy smoking, and alcohol consumption are associated with the risk of anemia. The objective of this study was to investigate the associations between dietary patterns, lifestyle, nutritional status, and anemia-related biomarkers among adults using a multivariable regression model. Taiwanese adults aged 20-45 years ( = 118,924, 43,055 men and 75,869 women) were obtained from the Mei Jau Health Management Institution database, between 2001 and 2015, for data analysis. The anemia-inflammation-related dietary pattern was derived by reduced rank regression analysis. Dietary patterns with high intakes of eggs, meat, organ meats, rice or flour products, fried foods, sugary beverages, and processed foods significantly increased the risk of anemia, and was associated with decreased hemoglobin, hematocrit, and red blood cells, but increased white blood cells and C-reactive protein levels. Moreover, current alcohol drinkers, as well as people who were underweight, overweight, obese, and central obese, were more likely to increase their risk of anemia by 46%, 20%, 23%, 34%, and 28%, respectively. Interestingly, participants who are current or past smokers were inversely associated with risk of anemia. In conclusion, adherence to the anemia-inflammation dietary pattern was associated with an increased risk of anemia in Taiwanese adults. Furthermore, abnormal weight status and alcohol drinking were correlated with an increased risk of anemia.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18073438DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8037593PMC
March 2021

Association of Nutrition Education and Its Interaction with Lifestyle Factors on Kidney Function Parameters and Cardiovascular Risk Factors among Chronic Kidney Disease Patients in Taiwan.

Nutrients 2021 Jan 21;13(2). Epub 2021 Jan 21.

School of Nutrition and Health Sciences, College of Nutrition, Taipei Medical University, 250 Wu-Hsing Street, Xinyi District, Taipei 110, Taiwan.

We evaluated the interactive effects of nutrition education (NE) and lifestyle factors on kidney function parameters and cardiovascular risk factors among chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. This cross-sectional cohort study recruited 2176 CKD stages 3-5 patients aged > 20 years from Integrated Chronic Kidney Disease Care Network, Shuang Ho Hospital, Taiwan between December 2008 and April 2019. The multivariable regression analysis was performed to investigate the interactive effects of NE with lifestyle factors on kidney function parameters and cardiovascular risk factors. Relative excess risk due to interaction (RERI) and attributable proportion (AP) were applied to assess additive interaction. Patients who were smoking or physically inactive but received NE had better estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) (β: 3.83, 95% CI: 1.17-6.49 or β: 3.67, 95% CI: 2.04-5.29) compared to those without NE. Patients with smoking and NE significantly reduced risks for having high glycated hemoglobin A (HbA) by 47%, high low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) by 38%, and high corrected calcium (C-Ca) by 50% compared to those without NE. Moreover, NE and smoking or inactive physical activity exhibited an excess risk of high C-Ca (RERI: 0.47, 95% CI: 0.09-0.85 for smoking or RERI: 0.46, 95% CI: 0.01-0.90 and AP: 0.51, 95% CI: 0.03-0.99 for physical activity). Our study suggests that CKD patients who were enrolled in the NE program had better kidney function. Thus, NE could be associated with slowing kidney function decline and improving cardiovascular risk factors.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/nu13020298DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7909784PMC
January 2021

Association of Testosterone-Related Dietary Pattern with Testicular Function among Adult Men: A Cross-Sectional Health Screening Study in Taiwan.

Nutrients 2021 Jan 18;13(1). Epub 2021 Jan 18.

Research Center for Healthcare Industry Innovation, National Taipei University of Nursing and Health Sciences, 365 Ming-Te Road, Beitou District, Taipei 112, Taiwan.

Diets could play an important role in testicular function, but studies on how adherence to the dietary patterns influences human testicular function in Asian countries are scarce. Herein, we examined the association between testosterone-related dietary patterns and testicular function among adult men in Taiwan. This cross-sectional study recruited 3283 men who attended a private medical screening program from 2009 to 2015. Testosterone-related dietary pattern was generated by the reduced rank regression (RRR) method. The association between adherence to quartile of dietary pattern scores with sex hormones (testosterone, follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), and estradiol (E2)) and sperm quality (sperm concentration (SC), total sperm motility (TSM), progressive motility (PRM), and normal sperm morphology (NSM)) were examined by multivariable linear regression. Hemoglobin (β = 0.57, < 0.001), hematocrit (β = 0.17, = 0.002), triglyceride (β = -0.84, < 0.001), HDL-cholesterol (β = 3.58, < 0.001), total cholesterol to HDL-cholesterol ratio (β = -0.78, < 0.001), and uric acid (β = -10.77, < 0.001) were highly correlated with testosterone levels. Therefore, these biomarkers were used to construct a testosterone-related dietary pattern. Highest adherence (Q4) to dietary pattern scores were negatively associated with lower testosterone in the pooled analysis (β = -0.89, = 0.037) and normal-weight men (β = -1.48, = 0.019). Likewise, men in the Q4 of the dietary pattern had lower SC (β = -5.55, = 0.001) and NSM (β = -2.22, = 0.007) regardless of their nutritional status. Our study suggesting that testosterone-related dietary pattern (rich in preserved vegetables or processed meat or fish, deep-fried foods, innards organs, rice or flour products cooked in oil, and dipping sauce, but low in milk, dairy products, legumes, or beans, and dark or leafy vegetables) was associated with a poor testicular function.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/nu13010259DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7830687PMC
January 2021

Comparing two methods for deriving dietary patterns associated with risk of metabolic syndrome among middle-aged and elderly Taiwanese adults with impaired kidney function.

BMC Med Res Methodol 2020 10 14;20(1):255. Epub 2020 Oct 14.

School of Nutrition and Health Sciences, College of Nutrition, Taipei Medical University, 250 Wu-Hsing Street, Taipei, 11031, Taiwan.

Background: Dietary patterns were associated with the risk of chronic disease development and outcome-related diseases. In this study, we aimed to compare the correlation between dietary patterns and metabolic syndrome (MetS) using two methods for identifying dietary patterns.

Methods: The participants (n = 25,569) aged ≥40 years with impaired kidney function were retrieved from Mei Jau (MJ) Health Screening database from 2008 to 2010. Dietary patterns were identified by principal component analysis (PCA) and reduced rank regression (RRR) from twenty-two food groups using PROC FACTOR and PROC PLS functions.

Results: We identified two similar dietary pattern characteristics (high intakes of deep fried foods, preserved or processed foods, dipping sauce, meat, sugary drinks, organ meats, jam/honey, fried rice/flour products, instant noodles and eggs) derived by PCA and RRR. Logistic regression analysis revealed that RRR-derived dietary pattern scores were positively associated with an odds ratio (OR = 1.70, 95% CI: 1.56, 1.86) of having MetS than PCA-derived dietary pattern scores (OR = 1.38, 95% CI: 1.27, 1.51). The correlations between RRR-derived dietary pattern scores and elevated systolic and diastolic blood pressure (OR = 1.30 for both) or low high density lipoprotein cholesterol in women (OR = 1.32) were statistically significant but not significant in PCA-derived dietary pattern scores.

Conclusions: Our findings suggest that RRR gives better results when studying behavior related dietary patterns in association with MetS. RRR may be more preferable to provide dietary information for developing dietary guidelines among people with MetS. Further studies with prospective measurements are needed to verify whether RRR is a useful analytic tool for the association between dietary patterns and other chronic diseases.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12874-020-01142-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7559471PMC
October 2020

Use of mobile applications to improve nutrition behaviour: A systematic review.

Comput Methods Programs Biomed 2020 Aug 19;192:105459. Epub 2020 Mar 19.

International Center for Health Information Technology (ICHIT), Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan; Department of Public Health and Community Medicine, Shaikh Zayed Medical Complex, Lahore, Pakistan; Master's Program in Global Health & Development Dept., PhD Program in Global Health & Health Security Dept., College of Public Health, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan. Electronic address:

Background And Objective: Mobile applications could be effectively used for dietary intake assessment, physical activity monitoring, behavior improvement, and nutrition education. The aim of this review is to determine the effectiveness of mobile applications in improving nutrition behaviors through a systematic review of literature.

Methods: The review protocol was registered with PROSPERO: registration number CRD42018118809, and followed PRISMA guidelines. We involved original articles including mobile electronic devices for improving dietary intake, physical activity, and weight management in adult populations in this review. Data were retrieved from January 2010 to December 2018 with PubMed, Web of Science, Excerpta Medica Database (Embase), and Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) as data sources. Authors individually screened the titles and abstracts, then full articles in order to obtain papers that met inclusion criteria.

Results: The database search yielded 2962 records. After removing the duplicates and analyzing the full text papers a total of 8 original articles were reviewed. Two articles showed obvious bias and were not included in our results or discussion. The remaining six articles with low to moderate bias risk were included in this systematic review. Three selected studies were randomized control trials (RCTs) with over 180 participants each. The other three studies were a nested trial, a case-control trial, and a pilot RCT with 36, 162, and 24 participants respectively. All larger RCTs and the small case control trail showed significant improvements in some nutritional-health objectives measured. The other two trials showed insignificant improvements in outcomes measured between groups.

Conclusion: This study highlights the potential significant health benefits acquirable through mobile health application-assisted nutrition interventions. Some of these studies required significant financial and time input from providers for the application's utilization. Further studies, perhaps with multiple intervention arms, are required to compare across programs the elements that are essential for health benefits observed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cmpb.2020.105459DOI Listing
August 2020