Publications by authors named "Rashmi Tyagi"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Identification and validation of potent Mycobacterial proteasome inhibitor from Enamine library.

J Biomol Struct Dyn 2021 May 6:1-11. Epub 2021 May 6.

Centre for Drug Design Discovery and Development (C4D), SRM University, Delhi NCR, Sonepat, India.

As a consequence of present status of tuberculosis (TB) it is the obligation to develop novel targets and potential drugs so that rate of drug resistant TB can be declined. Mycobacterium proteasome is considered to be significant target for the purpose of drug designing as it is responsible for resisting the effect of NO (nitric oxide) immune system defence mechanism against the bacterial cells. Small compounds library from Enamine database has already been tested using virtual screening and molecular docking studies. Further a reanalysis with two picked out significant compounds Z1020863610, Z106766984 was carried out using molecular dynamic simulation studies and in vitro validations ( susceptibility assay, enzyme inhibition assay and MTT assay). outcome that two inhibiters were interacting at the active site pocket of receptor with high stability, was found to be very consistent with results. So it was conferred that compounds (Z1020863610, Z106766984) are potential lead for future process of drug development ( testing and clinical trials).Communicated by Ramaswamy H. Sarma.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/07391102.2021.1914173DOI Listing
May 2021

Development of potential proteasome inhibitors against .

J Biomol Struct Dyn 2020 Oct 19:1-15. Epub 2020 Oct 19.

Centre for Drug Design Discovery and Development (C4D), SRM University, Delhi, Haryana, India.

Tuberculosis (TB) has been recently declared as a health emergency because of sporadic increase in Multidrug-resistant Tuberculosis (MDR-TB) problem throughout the world. TB causing bacteria, has become resistant to the first line of treatment along with second line of treatment and drugs, which are accessible to us. Thus, there is an urgent need of identification of key targets and development of potential therapeutic approach(s), which can overcome the complications. In the present study, proteasome has been taken as a potential target as it is one of the key regulatory proteins in propagation. Further, a library of 400 compounds (small molecule) from Medicines for Malaria Venture (MMV) were screened against the target (proteasome) using molecular docking and simulation approach, and selected lead compounds were validated in model. In this study, we have identified two potent small molecules from the MMV Pathogen Box library, MMV019838 and MMV687146 with -9.8kcal/mol and -8.7kcal/mol binding energy respectively, which actively interact with the catalytic domain/active domain of proteasome and inhibit the growth in culture. Furthermore, the molecular docking and simulation study of MMV019838 and MMV687146 with proteasome show strong and stable interaction with compared to human proteasome and show no cytotoxicity effect. A better understanding of proteasome inhibition in in and model would eventually allow us to understand the molecular mechanism(s) and discover a novel and potent therapeutic agent against Tuberculosis. Active efflux of drugs mediated by efflux pumps that confer drug resistance is one of the mechanisms developed by bacteria to counter the adverse effects of antibiotics and chemicals. Efflux pump activity was tested for a specific compound MMV019838 which was showing good in silico results than MIC values.Communicated by Ramaswamy H. Sarma.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/07391102.2020.1835722DOI Listing
October 2020

Imidazoline and its derivatives: an overview.

J Oleo Sci 2007 ;56(5):211-22

Department of Chemical Engineering, Jaypee Institite of Engineering and Technology, Guna, India.

Imidazoline derivatives, a class of novel cationic surfactants are presently gaining importance in global detergent market due to their wide range of applications. These are extensively used mainly as fabric softeners and antistatic agents. The present communication reviews the preparation, reaction scheme, reaction rates and properties of imidazoline derivatives. The analysis of imidazoline derivatives, its mode of action, their biodegradation and various applications have also been discussed.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.5650/jos.56.211DOI Listing
December 2007

Role of white light in reversing UV-B-mediated effects in the N2-fixing cyanobacterium Anabaena BT2.

J Photochem Photobiol B 2003 Oct;71(1-3):35-42

School of Biotechnology, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi 221 005, India.

The effects of various irradiances of artificial UV-B (280-315 nm) in the presence or absence of visible light (photosynthetically active radiation) on growth, survival, 14CO2 uptake and ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase (RuBISCO) activity were studied in the N2-fixing cyanobacterium Anabaena BT2. We tested the hypothesis whether or not visible radiation offers any protection against UV-B-induced deleterious effects on growth and photosynthesis in Anabaena BT2. Attempts were also made to determine the irradiances of UV-B where inhibitory effects could be mitigated by simultaneous irradiation with visible light. Exposure of cultures to 0.2 W m(-2) or higher irradiance of UV-B caused inhibition of growth and survival and growth ceased above 1.0 W m(-2). 14CO uptake and RuBISCO activity were found to be more sensitive to UV-B and around 60% reduction in 14CO2 uptake and RuBISCO activity occurred after exposure of cultures to 0.4 W m(-2) for 1 h. However, growth, 14CO2 uptake and RuBISCO activity were nearly normal when UV-B (0.4 W m(-2)) and visible light (14.4 W m(-2)) were given simultaneously. Blue radiation (450 nm) was found to be the most effective in photoreactivation against UV-B, better than UV-A or any other light wavelength band. Our results demonstrate that the studied cyanobacterium possesses active photoreactivation mechanism(s) against UV-B-mediated damage which in turn probably allow survival under natural conditions in spite of being continuously exposed to the UV-B component present in the solar radiation. Continued growth of many algae and cyanobacteria in the presence of intense solar UV-B radiation under natural conditions seems to be due to the active role of photoreactivation.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jphotobiol.2003.07.002DOI Listing
October 2003