Publications by authors named "Rashi Pangti"

13 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Pemphigoid gestationis: a rare pregnancy dermatosis treated with a combination of IVIg and rituximab.

BMJ Case Rep 2021 Mar 16;14(3). Epub 2021 Mar 16.

Dermatology and Venereology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India

Pemphigoid gestationis is a rare autoimmune subepidermal bullous dermatosis occurring during pregnancy and post partum. A 32-year-old woman developed itchy urticarial wheals over the trunk and extremities at 6 months of gestation. This was not controlled with antihistamines, and 2 months later, the patient developed multiple vesiculobullous lesions. The patient had an exacerbation 3 weeks post-delivery. She did not go into remission for 6 months post partum despite treatment with prednisolone 40 mg/day, doxycycline 100 mg two times per day and dapsone 100 mg/day. The patient went into remission following treatment with three courses of intravenous immunoglobulin 2 mg/kg/course and 2 doses of rituximab 1 g at a 2-week interval.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bcr-2020-241496DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7970317PMC
March 2021

Electromechanical resection: A novel method for quick, bloodless removal of multiple benign lesions.

Indian J Dermatol Venereol Leprol 2021 02 24:1-2. Epub 2021 Feb 24.

Department of Dermatology and Venereology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.25259/IJDVL_278_20DOI Listing
February 2021

White Sponge Nevus of Glans Penis.

J Cutan Med Surg 2021 Mar 3:1203475421995734. Epub 2021 Mar 3.

28730 Department of Dermatology and Venereology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1203475421995734DOI Listing
March 2021

A convolutional neural network architecture for the recognition of cutaneous manifestations of COVID-19.

Dermatol Ther 2021 Mar 28;34(2):e14902. Epub 2021 Feb 28.

Department of Dermatology and Venereology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India.

During the COVID-19 pandemic, dermatologists reported an array of different cutaneous manifestations of the disease. It is challenging to discriminate COVID-19-related cutaneous manifestations from other closely resembling skin lesions. The aim of this study was to generate and evaluate a novel CNN (Convolutional Neural Network) ensemble architecture for detection of COVID-19-associated skin lesions from clinical images. An ensemble model of three different CNN-based algorithms was trained with clinical images of skin lesions from confirmed COVID-19 positive patients, healthy controls as well as 18 other common skin conditions, which included close mimics of COVID-19 skin lesions such as urticaria, varicella, pityriasis rosea, herpes zoster, bullous pemphigoid and psoriasis. The multi-class model demonstrated an overall top-1 accuracy of 86.7% for all 20 diseases. The sensitivity and specificity of COVID-19-rash detection were found to be 84.2 ± 5.1% and 99.5 ± 0.2%, respectively. The positive predictive value, NPV and area under curve values for COVID-19-rash were 88.0 ± 5.6%, 99.4 ± 0.2% and 0.97 ± 0.25, respectively. The binary classifier had a mean sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of 76.81 ± 6.25%, 99.77 ± 0.14% and 98.91 ± 0.17%, respectively for COVID-19 rash. The model was robust in detection of all skin lesions on both white and skin of color, although only a few images of COVID-19-associated skin lesions from skin of color were available. To our best knowledge, this is the first machine learning-based study for automated detection of COVID-19 based on skin images and may provide a useful decision support tool for physicians to optimize contact-free COVID-19 triage, differential diagnosis of skin lesions and patient care.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/dth.14902DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7995139PMC
March 2021

Restrictive Dermopathy - A Rare Congenital Skin Disorder.

Indian J Dermatol 2020 Nov-Dec;65(6):519-521

Department of Dermatology, Lady Hardinge Medical College, New Delhi, India.

Restrictive dermopathy is a rare, autosomal recessive, lethal congenital skin disorder. This congenital genodermatosis could be mistaken for various other similar skin disorders. Diagnosis is a must in the context of genetic counseling for the subsequent pregnancy. We herein report a preterm male neonate with restrictive dermopathy, with additional feature of multiple bone fractures.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/ijd.IJD_554_18DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7810072PMC
January 2021

Performance of a deep learning-based application for the diagnosis of basal cell carcinoma in Indian patients as compared to dermatologists and nondermatologists.

Int J Dermatol 2021 Feb 11;60(2):e51-e52. Epub 2020 Oct 11.

Department of Dermatology & Venereology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/ijd.15242DOI Listing
February 2021

Comparison of efficacy of noncultured hair follicle cell suspension and noncultured epidermal cell suspension in repigmentation of leukotrichia and skin patch in vitiligo: a randomized trial.

Int J Dermatol 2020 Nov 29;59(11):1393-1400. Epub 2020 Sep 29.

Department of Dermatology and Venereology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India.

Background: Vitiligo manifests as hypo- to de-pigmented macules, which are sometimes associated with leukotrichia. For complete cosmetic improvement, the repigmentation of leukotrichia is an important component.

Methods: This randomized controlled trial included patients with stable vitiligo with leukotrichia. Two vitiligo patches in each patient were randomized to receive either of the two procedures. The patients were followed up for 9 months posttransplantation. The efficacy of hair follicle cell suspension (HFCS) with epidermal cell suspension (ECS) in repigmentation of leukotrichia and skin in vitiligo was compared.

Results: A total of 20 patients underwent the procedure, and 19 completed the follow-up. The area of the vitiligo patch and the number of leukotrichia in the patches were comparable between the two groups. There was a significant difference in the mean ± S.D. number of cells transplanted between the two groups (5.06 × 10 in HFCS vs. 39.8 × 10 in ECS, P < 0.0001). The percentage viability of cells and proportion of melanocytes were comparable between the two groups. A total of 10 patients in HFCS and eight patients in ECS had repigmentation of leukotrichia. The mean ± S.D. percentages of depigmented hair showing repigmentation at nine months were 7.42 ± 11.62% in HFCS and 11.42 ± 17.90% in ECS (P = 0.4195), whereas the mean ± S.D. percentage repigmentation of vitiligo patches was 61.58 ± 42.68% in HFCS and 78.68 ± 30.03% in ECS (P = 0.1618).

Conclusions: The mean number of cells transplanted in the HFCS group was about eight times less than those in ECS. ECS was better than HFCS in repigmentation of leukotrichia and vitiligo, although the difference was not statistically significant.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/ijd.15188DOI Listing
November 2020

Recommendations for Cutaneous and Aesthetic Surgeries during COVID-19 Pandemic.

J Cutan Aesthet Surg 2020 Apr-Jun;13(2):77-94

Department of Dermatology, Ashwini Rural Medical College, Solapur, Maharashtra, India.

Background: Amid the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, dermatologists must be prepared to restructure their practice of procedural dermatology and cutaneous aesthetic surgeries. The COVID-19 pandemic has presented several challenges and has ushered in several changes in practice such as teledermatology, with many physicians adopting virtual consultations and treatments. Performing procedures in the times of COVID-19 pandemic presents challenges such as risk of transmission to doctors and staff due to potential aerosolization, release of virus droplets during the procedures, and risk of virus transfer through the instruments both in the peri- and postoperative period. This can have several medical, administrative, and legal implications.

Objectives: This document aimed to outline best practices that can be followed in this scenario to perform cutaneous surgeries and procedures to ensure safer skin surgery.

Recommendations: Standard precautions include social distancing of at least 1 m, hand hygiene, appropriate use of personal protective equipment (PPE), safe injection practices, sterilization and disinfection of medical devices, environmental cleaning, and respiratory hygiene. It is generally advisable to see patients only by appointments. Each clinic should have a special area at entry for screening patients and providing sanitizers and masks. Procedures, which are of short duration, performed on nonfacial areas are considered as low risk and require donning surgical mask. Procedures involved with minimal invasiveness and bleeding, short duration procedures on the face such as injectables, chemical peels, and aerosol-generating procedures on nonfacial areas are considered moderate risk. These procedures need apron with head cover, N95 mask, face shield, double gloves, and smoke evacuator with high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) or ultralow particulate air (ULPA) filter. Aerosol and plume-regenerating procedures (such as ablative lasers on the face), prolonged surgeries on head (such as hair transplantation), intraoral, and intranasal procedures are considered high risk. These procedures must be carried out with full body cover with surgical gown, head cover, N95 mask, face shield, double gloves, and smoke evacuator. Physicians should be aware of local epidemiological situation and adhere to the relevant guidelines issued by the relevant governmental agencies.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/JCAS.JCAS_83_20DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7394118PMC
August 2020

Follicular unit extraction of leukotrichia and replacement with follicular units from scalp in combination with epidermal cell suspension in a case of vitiligo.

Dermatol Ther 2020 11 13;33(6):e13916. Epub 2020 Jul 13.

Department of Dermatology and Venereology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/dth.13916DOI Listing
November 2020

Monopolar electrosurgical tunneling combined with bipolar coagulation for bloodless resection of sessile benign skin lesions.

J Am Acad Dermatol 2020 Jan 17. Epub 2020 Jan 17.

Department of Dermatology and Venereology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India. Electronic address:

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jaad.2020.01.015DOI Listing
January 2020

Bipolar forceps of a high-power electrosurgical unit for precise removal of small benign skin lesions.

J Am Acad Dermatol 2020 May 15;82(5):e155-e156. Epub 2019 Mar 15.

Department of Dermatology and Venereology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India. Electronic address:

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jaad.2019.03.026DOI Listing
May 2020