Publications by authors named "Rasha Farghaly"

2 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Safety and efficacy of sofosbuvir/ledipasvir and sofosbuvir/daclatasvir in the treatment of hepatitis C in patients with decompensated cirrhosis.

Eur J Gastroenterol Hepatol 2021 Sep 21. Epub 2021 Sep 21.

Endemic Medicine Department, Faculty of Medicine, Helwan University, Cairo Tropical medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Alexandria University, Alexandria Endemic Medicine and Hepatology Department, Faculty of Medicine, Cairo University Department of Internal Medicine, Al-Azhar University Tropical Medicine Department, Faculty of Medicine, Ain Shams University, Cairo Department of community medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Suez Canal University Hepatogastroenterology Department, National Hepatology & Tropical Medicine Research Institute, Cairo Gastroenterology Department, Damietta Cardiology and Gastroenterology Center, Damietta Hepatology and Gastroenterology Department, AGOZA Police Hospital, Cairo Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine Department, National Liver Institute, Menoufia University, Menoufia, Egypt Hepatology and gastroenterology department, national liver institute.Menoufia University, Egypt.

Background: Hepatitis C virus (HCV)-related decompensated cirrhosis is a severe life-threatening illness. The safety of direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) has opened a gate of hope for that subgroup of patients who were previously contraindicated for interferon therapy.

Objective: We aimed at the investigation of the safety and efficacy of different DAAs regimens in the treatment of HCV-related decompensated cirrhosis patients, to determine sustained virological response (SVR)12 rates and to analyze the factors associated with response.

Methods: A retrospective, single-center study including HCV-related decompensated cirrhosis patients who received DAAs. Demographic, laboratory and clinical data were analyzed. The SVR12 rate was the primary outcome measure. Secondary outcomes included the predictors of response, changes in the baseline model for end-stage liver disease and child-turcotte-pugh (CTP) scores, and fibroindices (APRI and fibrosis-4 index) at 12 weeks after treatment.

Results: In total, 145 eligible patients (141 with CTP class B and 4 with class C) were enrolled in this study. SVR12 was achieved by 88.06% (118/134) of efficacy population on different DAAs regimens, Treatment was discontinued in 11 patients because of severe side effects without any deaths. Younger age showed a significant positive association with SVR12.

Conclusions: DAAs can be used for the treatment of HCV-related decompensated liver disease, with acceptable SVR12 rates and safety profiles.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/MEG.0000000000002287DOI Listing
September 2021

Pattern of Blood Stream Infections within Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, Suez Canal University Hospital, Ismailia, Egypt.

Int J Microbiol 2014 20;2014:276873. Epub 2014 Oct 20.

Endemic and Infectious Disease Department, Faculty of Medicine, Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt.

Introduction. Blood stream infection (BSI) is a common problem of newborn in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs). Monitoring neonatal infections is increasingly regarded as an important contributor to safe and high-quality healthcare. It results in high mortality rate and serious complications. So, our aim was to determine the incidence and the pattern of BSIs in the NICU of Suez Canal University Hospital, Egypt, and to determine its impact on hospitalization, mortality, and morbidity. Methods. This study was a prospective one in which all neonates admitted to the NICUs in Suez Canal University hospital between January, 2013 and June 2013 were enrolled. Blood stream infections were monitored prospectively. The health care associated infection rate, mortality rate, causative organism, and risk factors were studied. Results. A total of 317 neonates were admitted to the NICU with a mortality rate of 36.0%. During this study period, 115/317 (36.3%) developed clinical signs of sepsis and were confirmed as BSIs by blood culture in only 90 neonates with 97 isolates. The total mean length of stay was significantly longer among infected than noninfected neonates (34.5 ± 18.3 and 10.8 ± 9.9 days, resp., P value < 0.001). The overall mortality rates among infected and noninfected neonates were 38.9% and 34.8%, respectively, with a significant difference. Klebsiella spp. were the most common pathogen (27.8%) followed by Pseudomonas (21.6%) and Staphylococcus aureus (15.4%). Conclusion. The rate of BSIs in NICU at Suez Canal University Hospital was relatively high with high mortality rate (36.0%).
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/276873DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4217241PMC
November 2014
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