Publications by authors named "Ran-Ran Duan"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Exosomes derived from bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells protect the injured spinal cord by inhibiting pericyte pyroptosis.

Neural Regen Res 2022 Jan;17(1):194-202

Department of Neurology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, Henan Province, China.

Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) transplantation is a promising treatment strategy for spinal cord injury, but immunological rejection and possible tumor formation limit its application. The therapeutic effects of MSCs mainly depend on their release of soluble paracrine factors. Exosomes are essential for the secretion of these paracrine effectors. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell-derived exosomes (BMSC-EXOs) can be substituted for BMSCs in cell transplantation. However, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. In this study, a rat model of T10 spinal cord injury was established using the impact method. Then, 30 minutes and 1 day after spinal cord injury, the rats were administered 200 μL exosomes via the tail vein (200 μg/mL; approximately 1 × 10 BMSCs). Treatment with BMSC-EXOs greatly reduced neuronal cell death, improved myelin arrangement and reduced myelin loss, increased pericyte/endothelial cell coverage on the vascular wall, decreased blood-spinal cord barrier leakage, reduced caspase 1 expression, inhibited interleukin-1β release, and accelerated locomotor functional recovery in rats with spinal cord injury. In the cell culture experiment, pericytes were treated with interferon-γ and tumor necrosis factor-α. Then, Lipofectamine 3000 was used to deliver lipopolysaccharide into the cells, and the cells were co-incubated with adenosine triphosphate to simulate injury in vitro. Pre-treatment with BMSC-EXOs for 8 hours greatly reduced pericyte pyroptosis and increased pericyte survival rate. These findings suggest that BMSC-EXOs may protect pericytes by inhibiting pyroptosis and by improving blood-spinal cord barrier integrity, thereby promoting the survival of neurons and the extension of nerve fibers, and ultimately improving motor function in rats with spinal cord injury. All protocols were conducted with the approval of the Animal Ethics Committee of Zhengzhou University on March 16, 2019.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/1673-5374.314323DOI Listing
January 2022

Synthesis, crystal structures, photoluminescence properties and DNA binding of triazine-nickel(II) complexes for DNA detection.

Spectrochim Acta A Mol Biomol Spectrosc 2015 29;151:64-71. Epub 2015 May 29.

College of Materials and Energy, South China Agricultural University, Guangzhou 510642, PR China. Electronic address:

We report here the synthesis of three new nickel(II) complexes: [Ni(PzTA)2CO3]·5H2O (PzTA=2,4-diamino-6-(2'-pyrazin)-1,3,5-triazine) in 1, [NiQ(PyTA)(H2O)2]Cl·H2O (HQ=8-hydroxyquinoline, PyTA=2,4-diamino-6-(2'-pyridyl)-1,3,5-triazine) in 2, [NiQ(PzTA)(H2O)2]Cl·H2O in 3, and they were characterized by UV spectroscopy, elemental analysis, molar conductivity and X-ray single crystal diffraction. Binding of the complexes to ct-DNA was investigated with electronic spectroscopy, ethidium bromide displacement from DNA, viscometry and cyclic voltammetry. The results depicted the DNA binding mode of the three complexes was intercalation, and complex 1 together with external static-electricity. Moreover, the three complexes also presented potential anti-oxidant activity. Interestingly, we found 1 was sensitive to oxygen and to the polarity of nonaqueous solvents in fluorescence spectroscopy. Fluorescence of 2 and 3 is weak in neutral aqueous solvents, but is greatly enhanced by addition of ct-DNA. Thus, 2 and 3 can be used to DNA detection as DNA fluorescence probes with a LOD of 1.61 ng mL(-1), 4.90 ng mL(-1) for the relative wide linear range of 0.01-20 μg mL(-1), 0.02-30 μg mL(-1), respectively. These findings indicate that 1 may be a potential optical probe for oxygen-free environments in nonaqueous form, while 2 and 3 were DNA-targeted probes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.saa.2015.05.063DOI Listing
September 2016

[A preliminary study of plasma microRNA levels in children with methylmalonic acidemia].

Zhongguo Dang Dai Er Ke Za Zhi 2014 Jun;16(6):629-33

Department of Neurology, First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450052, China.

Objective: To screen out differentially expressed microRNAs (miRNAs) in the plasma of children with methylmalonic acidemia (MMA), to determine the expression of miR-9-1 in plasma and to preliminarily evaluate the significance of miR-9-1 as a biomarker in MMA.

Methods: Plasma was obtained from 17 MMA children, 10 hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy) children without MMA (HHcy group), and 10 normal controls. Of 17 MMA children, 12 had HHcy (MMA+HHcy group), and 5 had no HHcy (MMA group). The differentially expressed miRNAs were screened out by miRNA microarray. Differentially expressed miR-9-1 was selected, and plasma miR-9-1 levels were determined by RT-PCR. Urine was collected from MMA patients who received vitamin B12 treatment, and plasma miR-9-1 levels were determined by RT-PCR after treatment.

Results: The miRNA microarray analysis showed that 26 miRNAs were differentially expressed, among which 16 miRNAs (including miR-9-1) were down-regulated over 2 times, while 10 miRNAs were up-regulated over 2 times. The MMA+HHcy , MMA and HHcy groups had significantly down-regulated miR-9-1 compared with the normal control group (P<0.01). The patients who showed a good response to vitamin B12 treatment had significantly increased plasma miR-9-1 levels, without significant difference compared with the normal control group.

Conclusions: Plasma miR-9-1 is significantly down-regulated in MMA patients, but it is significantly up-regulated after vitamin B12 treatment, suggesting that miR-9-1 may act as a biomarker in monitoring the progression of MMA.
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June 2014

Synthesis, crystal structures, DNA binding and photoluminescence properties of [Cu(pzta)2Cl]Cl⋅H2O for DNA detection.

Spectrochim Acta A Mol Biomol Spectrosc 2014 Jul 15;128:614-21. Epub 2014 Mar 15.

College of Science, South China Agricultural University, Guangzhou 510642, PR China; Institute of Biomaterial, South China Agricultural University, Guangzhou 510642, PR China. Electronic address:

We report here the synthesis of a new copper(II) complex of 2,4-diamino-6-(2'-pyrazin)-1,3,5-triazine [Cu(pzta)2Cl]Cl·H2O and its characterization using UV and IR spectroscopy, elemental analysis, and X-ray diffraction. Fluorescence spectroscopy revealed that the complex was sensitive to oxygen and to the polarity of nonaqueous solvents. Binding of the complex to DNA was investigated using UV spectroscopy, ethidium bromide displacement from DNA, cyclic voltammetry, and viscometry. The results revealed the DNA binding mode was intercalation together with external static-electricity. However, the complex can be also used to DNA detection as DNA fluorescence probe with a LOD of 4.21 ng mL(-1) for the relative wide linear range between 0.2 and 17 μg mL(-1). In conclusion, that synthetic method of the complex was easy with low expense and was relatively rapid and sensitive compared to most toxic fluorescence dyes. This finding would indicate the complex may be a potential DNA-targeted probes and optical probes for oxygen-free environments in nonaqueous form.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.saa.2014.02.111DOI Listing
July 2014