Publications by authors named "Ramsha Zaheer"

9 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease: A real threat in Pakistan.

J Pak Med Assoc 2020 Dec;70(12(B)):2437-2440

Dr. Ziauddin Hospital, Clifton Campus, Karachi, Pakistan.

The rise in obesity, along with its association with unhealthy lifestyles and poor health awareness, has lead to an increasing prevalence of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Only a few studies have addressed the changing trends in obesity and have tried to estimate the frequency of NAFLD in Pakistan. Fatty liver is seen in about 15% of the general population. Insulin resistance, diabetes, dyslipidaemia, high body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference, and increasing age are associated with NAFLD. In patients without insulin resistance, dyslipidaemia is usually present. Lean NAFLD is not common. In facilities where elastography in unavailable, NAFLD fibrosis score may be used to predict NAFLD in such patients. There is a need to conduct population-based studies to understand the risks and to design initiatives to increase public awareness regarding this disease. NAFLD screening is advisable in overweight individuals, diabetic patients, and persons at high cardiovascular disease risk.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.5455/JPMA.95891DOI Listing
December 2020

Upper GI hemorrhage after percutaneous coronary intervention.

Gastrointest Endosc 2021 01;93(1):270

University Hospitals Birmingham, Birmingham, UK.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.gie.2020.07.017DOI Listing
January 2021

Clinical insight into the involvement of gut and liver by COVID-19.

J Pak Med Assoc 2020 Jun;70(6):952-953

Postgraduate Resident, Department of Medicine, Dr. Ziauddin Hospital, Clifton Campus, Karachi.

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June 2020

The invisible victims - Impact of the pandemic on patients without COVID-19.

J Pak Med Assoc 2020 May;70(Suppl 3)(5):S149-S152

Dr. Ziauddin Hospital, Clifton Campus, Karachi, Pakistan.

The coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic has shocked the world to a standstill. Routine healthcare has been severely disrupted. Healthcare service is a finite resource and in the current pandemic situation the risks of providing care to individual patients, whether they be confirmed, probable or suspected cases, should be balanced against the ability to provide safe routine long-term care to others. But how far can the healthcare system protect itself and fear the unknown, before it starts causing harm by omission? Herein we provide a review of cases that were misdiagnosed, left stranded in the system or had to face unnecessary delays due to the lack of an organised pathway.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.5455/JPMA.36DOI Listing
May 2020

Knowledge and Beliefs Regarding Thalassemia in an Urban Population.

Cureus 2019 Jul 29;11(7):e5268. Epub 2019 Jul 29.

Internal Medicine, Dow Medical College and Civil Hospital, Karachi, PAK.

Background:  Thalassemia is one of the most common genetic blood disorders in Asia. Consanguineous marriages and avoiding pre-marital and antenatal screening are common in Pakistan due to psychosocial, cultural, and religious factors. Few studies have investigated the beliefs regarding thalassemia, especially in a developing country. The aim of this study was to assess the knowledge, beliefs, and practices regarding thalassemia in an urban population.

Method:  A cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted in the urban areas of Karachi, Pakistan over a period of six months during March 2016 through August 2016. Participants selected by representative sampling were interviewed face-to-face using a pre-designed, pre-tested questionnaire. The questionnaire was divided into four parts. The first part inquired about general demographic variables, while the second part assessed knowledge of the participant regarding thalassemia. The third and fourth parts were concerning the beliefs and practices regarding thalassemia. Data were entered and analyzed using the Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) Statistics, v. 24.0 (IBM SPSS Statistics, Armonk, NY).

Results:  Only 53% (n = 720) of the respondents had heard about thalassemia. The mean knowledge score was 5.8. The total possible score ranged between 0 - 12 with the higher scores indicating better knowledge. About three-quarters (70%) of the sample did not know that an individual can be a carrier of thalassemia. Less than half (38%) of the participants viewed premarital screening for thalassemia as necessary, with only 10% agreeing that thalassemia carriers should not marry. There was no pre-marriage counseling done in 98% of the families.  Conclusion: Our study highlights the prevalence of numerous myths and a low level of knowledge regarding thalassemia in an urban population of Pakistan.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.7759/cureus.5268DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6764615PMC
July 2019

Influences on medical career choice and future medical practice plans among women: Perspective from final year students and house officers.

J Pak Med Assoc 2018 Feb;68(2):272-275

Graduate Class of 2014, Dow Medical College, Dow University of Health Sciences, Karachi.

There is a growing perception in Pakistan that comparatively more women are gaining admissions and graduating from medical colleges; however these graduates are not practicing medicine. This pilot study provides perspectives on the influences on medical career choice and plans regarding future medical practice among female final-year students and house-officers in Karachi. Using convenience sampling, a study was conducted in August and September 2016, wherein out of 141 women, 95 (67.4%) were final-year medical students and 46 (32.6%) were house-officers. Most of the women (n=101; 71.6%) made their own choice to become doctors, while only 18 (12.8%) were compelled by their parents. An overwhelming majority (n=131; 92.9%) planned to do house job upon graduation or complete their ongoing one. Regarding post-graduation, 124 (87.9%) participants intended to acquire post-graduate qualification. Results indicate the need for representative studies to quantify the determinants and correlates of women's choice to study and practice medicine.
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February 2018

Awareness about human papillomavirus as a cause of cervical cancer and its prevention in the undergraduate female students of Karachi.

J Pak Med Assoc 2017 Jan;67(1):27-32

Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Jinnah Postgraduate Medical Center, Karachi, Pakistan.

Objective: To determine the rate of acceptance of human papillomavirus vaccine for prevention of cervical cancer, and to identify causes of its low acceptance and means of encouraging its uptake.

Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted at five different universities of Karachi, from July to December 2011, and comprised female undergraduate students. The participants, aged between 17-26 years, were in their first four years of undergraduate studies, and were selected from five universities. The distributed questionnaire included queries related to demographic information, knowledge and attitude about sexually transmitted diseases, cervical cancer, human papillomavirus and its vaccine. SPSS 20 was used for data analysis.

Results: Of the 1,277 participants, 1,038(81.3%) filled in the questionnaires correctly. Of them, the awareness level regarding sexually transmitted diseases, cervical cancer, human papillomavirus, and human papillomavirus as a cause of cervical cancer was 863(83.1%), 483(51.3%), 244(23.5%), and 138(13.3%), respectively. Moreover, 200(19.3%) participants were aware of the vaccine and 13(1.3%) had had themselves vaccinated.

Conclusions: Few respondents were aware of all the three topics, i.e. sexually transmitted diseases, cervical cancer and human papillomavirus. .
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January 2017

Neurology elective at the Royal London Hospital.

Authors:
Ramsha Zaheer

J Pak Med Assoc 2014 Jan;64(1):108-9

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January 2014

Naegleria Fowleri--the brain-eating amoeba.

Authors:
Ramsha Zaheer

J Pak Med Assoc 2013 Nov;63(11):1456

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November 2013
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