Publications by authors named "Ramona Baur-Streubel"

9 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Analysis of structural brain asymmetries in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder in 39 datasets.

J Child Psychol Psychiatry 2021 Mar 22. Epub 2021 Mar 22.

Department of Behavioral Neuroscience, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR, USA.

Objective: Some studies have suggested alterations of structural brain asymmetry in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), but findings have been contradictory and based on small samples. Here, we performed the largest ever analysis of brain left-right asymmetry in ADHD, using 39 datasets of the ENIGMA consortium.

Methods: We analyzed asymmetry of subcortical and cerebral cortical structures in up to 1,933 people with ADHD and 1,829 unaffected controls. Asymmetry Indexes (AIs) were calculated per participant for each bilaterally paired measure, and linear mixed effects modeling was applied separately in children, adolescents, adults, and the total sample, to test exhaustively for potential associations of ADHD with structural brain asymmetries.

Results: There was no evidence for altered caudate nucleus asymmetry in ADHD, in contrast to prior literature. In children, there was less rightward asymmetry of the total hemispheric surface area compared to controls (t = 2.1, p = .04). Lower rightward asymmetry of medial orbitofrontal cortex surface area in ADHD (t = 2.7, p = .01) was similar to a recent finding for autism spectrum disorder. There were also some differences in cortical thickness asymmetry across age groups. In adults with ADHD, globus pallidus asymmetry was altered compared to those without ADHD. However, all effects were small (Cohen's d from -0.18 to 0.18) and would not survive study-wide correction for multiple testing.

Conclusion: Prior studies of altered structural brain asymmetry in ADHD were likely underpowered to detect the small effects reported here. Altered structural asymmetry is unlikely to provide a useful biomarker for ADHD, but may provide neurobiological insights into the trait.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jcpp.13396DOI Listing
March 2021

Cortical thickness across the lifespan: Data from 17,075 healthy individuals aged 3-90 years.

Hum Brain Mapp 2021 Feb 17. Epub 2021 Feb 17.

Laboratory of Psychiatric Neuroimaging, Departamento e Instituto de Psiquiatria, Hospital das Clinicas HCFMUSP, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil.

Delineating the association of age and cortical thickness in healthy individuals is critical given the association of cortical thickness with cognition and behavior. Previous research has shown that robust estimates of the association between age and brain morphometry require large-scale studies. In response, we used cross-sectional data from 17,075 individuals aged 3-90 years from the Enhancing Neuroimaging Genetics through Meta-Analysis (ENIGMA) Consortium to infer age-related changes in cortical thickness. We used fractional polynomial (FP) regression to quantify the association between age and cortical thickness, and we computed normalized growth centiles using the parametric Lambda, Mu, and Sigma method. Interindividual variability was estimated using meta-analysis and one-way analysis of variance. For most regions, their highest cortical thickness value was observed in childhood. Age and cortical thickness showed a negative association; the slope was steeper up to the third decade of life and more gradual thereafter; notable exceptions to this general pattern were entorhinal, temporopolar, and anterior cingulate cortices. Interindividual variability was largest in temporal and frontal regions across the lifespan. Age and its FP combinations explained up to 59% variance in cortical thickness. These results may form the basis of further investigation on normative deviation in cortical thickness and its significance for behavioral and cognitive outcomes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/hbm.25364DOI Listing
February 2021

Subcortical volumes across the lifespan: Data from 18,605 healthy individuals aged 3-90 years.

Hum Brain Mapp 2021 Feb 11. Epub 2021 Feb 11.

Department of Psychology, Center for Brain Science, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA.

Age has a major effect on brain volume. However, the normative studies available are constrained by small sample sizes, restricted age coverage and significant methodological variability. These limitations introduce inconsistencies and may obscure or distort the lifespan trajectories of brain morphometry. In response, we capitalized on the resources of the Enhancing Neuroimaging Genetics through Meta-Analysis (ENIGMA) Consortium to examine age-related trajectories inferred from cross-sectional measures of the ventricles, the basal ganglia (caudate, putamen, pallidum, and nucleus accumbens), the thalamus, hippocampus and amygdala using magnetic resonance imaging data obtained from 18,605 individuals aged 3-90 years. All subcortical structure volumes were at their maximum value early in life. The volume of the basal ganglia showed a monotonic negative association with age thereafter; there was no significant association between age and the volumes of the thalamus, amygdala and the hippocampus (with some degree of decline in thalamus) until the sixth decade of life after which they also showed a steep negative association with age. The lateral ventricles showed continuous enlargement throughout the lifespan. Age was positively associated with inter-individual variability in the hippocampus and amygdala and the lateral ventricles. These results were robust to potential confounders and could be used to examine the functional significance of deviations from typical age-related morphometric patterns.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/hbm.25320DOI Listing
February 2021

Greater male than female variability in regional brain structure across the lifespan.

Hum Brain Mapp 2020 Oct 12. Epub 2020 Oct 12.

FIDMAG Germanes Hospitalàries Research Foundation, Barcelona, Spain.

For many traits, males show greater variability than females, with possible implications for understanding sex differences in health and disease. Here, the ENIGMA (Enhancing Neuro Imaging Genetics through Meta-Analysis) Consortium presents the largest-ever mega-analysis of sex differences in variability of brain structure, based on international data spanning nine decades of life. Subcortical volumes, cortical surface area and cortical thickness were assessed in MRI data of 16,683 healthy individuals 1-90 years old (47% females). We observed significant patterns of greater male than female between-subject variance for all subcortical volumetric measures, all cortical surface area measures, and 60% of cortical thickness measures. This pattern was stable across the lifespan for 50% of the subcortical structures, 70% of the regional area measures, and nearly all regions for thickness. Our findings that these sex differences are present in childhood implicate early life genetic or gene-environment interaction mechanisms. The findings highlight the importance of individual differences within the sexes, that may underpin sex-specific vulnerability to disorders.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/hbm.25204DOI Listing
October 2020

The genetic architecture of human brainstem structures and their involvement in common brain disorders.

Nat Commun 2020 08 11;11(1):4016. Epub 2020 Aug 11.

Department of Neuromedicine and Movement Science, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway.

Brainstem regions support vital bodily functions, yet their genetic architectures and involvement in common brain disorders remain understudied. Here, using imaging-genetics data from a discovery sample of 27,034 individuals, we identify 45 brainstem-associated genetic loci, including the first linked to midbrain, pons, and medulla oblongata volumes, and map them to 305 genes. In a replication sample of 7432 participants most of the loci show the same effect direction and are significant at a nominal threshold. We detect genetic overlap between brainstem volumes and eight psychiatric and neurological disorders. In additional clinical data from 5062 individuals with common brain disorders and 11,257 healthy controls, we observe differential volume alterations in schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, multiple sclerosis, mild cognitive impairment, dementia, and Parkinson's disease, supporting the relevance of brainstem regions and their genetic architectures in common brain disorders.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41467-020-17376-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7421944PMC
August 2020

Subcortical Brain Volume, Regional Cortical Thickness, and Cortical Surface Area Across Disorders: Findings From the ENIGMA ADHD, ASD, and OCD Working Groups.

Am J Psychiatry 2020 09 16;177(9):834-843. Epub 2020 Jun 16.

The full list of authors in the ENIGMA working groups, author affiliations, author disclosures, and acknowledgments are provided in online supplements.

Objective: Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), autism spectrum disorder (ASD), and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) are common neurodevelopmental disorders that frequently co-occur. The authors sought to directly compare these disorders using structural brain imaging data from ENIGMA consortium data.

Methods: Structural T-weighted whole-brain MRI data from healthy control subjects (N=5,827) and from patients with ADHD (N=2,271), ASD (N=1,777), and OCD (N=2,323) from 151 cohorts worldwide were analyzed using standardized processing protocols. The authors examined subcortical volume, cortical thickness, and cortical surface area differences within a mega-analytical framework, pooling measures extracted from each cohort. Analyses were performed separately for children, adolescents, and adults, using linear mixed-effects models adjusting for age, sex, and site (and intracranial volume for subcortical and surface area measures).

Results: No shared differences were found among all three disorders, and shared differences between any two disorders did not survive correction for multiple comparisons. Children with ADHD compared with those with OCD had smaller hippocampal volumes, possibly influenced by IQ. Children and adolescents with ADHD also had smaller intracranial volume than control subjects and those with OCD or ASD. Adults with ASD showed thicker frontal cortices compared with adult control subjects and other clinical groups. No OCD-specific differences were observed across different age groups and surface area differences among all disorders in childhood and adulthood.

Conclusions: The study findings suggest robust but subtle differences across different age groups among ADHD, ASD, and OCD. ADHD-specific intracranial volume and hippocampal differences in children and adolescents, and ASD-specific cortical thickness differences in the frontal cortex in adults, support previous work emphasizing structural brain differences in these disorders.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1176/appi.ajp.2020.19030331DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8296070PMC
September 2020

Common brain disorders are associated with heritable patterns of apparent aging of the brain.

Nat Neurosci 2019 10 24;22(10):1617-1623. Epub 2019 Sep 24.

Centre for Psychiatry Research, Department of Clinical Neuroscience Karolinska Institutet & Stockholm Health Care Services, Stockholm County Council, Stockholm, Sweden.

Common risk factors for psychiatric and other brain disorders are likely to converge on biological pathways influencing the development and maintenance of brain structure and function across life. Using structural MRI data from 45,615 individuals aged 3-96 years, we demonstrate distinct patterns of apparent brain aging in several brain disorders and reveal genetic pleiotropy between apparent brain aging in healthy individuals and common brain disorders.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41593-019-0471-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6823048PMC
October 2019

Brain Imaging of the Cortex in ADHD: A Coordinated Analysis of Large-Scale Clinical and Population-Based Samples.

Am J Psychiatry 2019 07 24;176(7):531-542. Epub 2019 Apr 24.

The Department of Human Genetics, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, the Netherlands (Hoogman, Guimaraes, Shumskaya, Wolfers, Bralten, Franke); the Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition, and Behavior, Radboud University, Nijmegen, the Netherlands (Hoogman, Shumskaya, Mennes, Wolfers, Buitelaar, Bralten, Franke); the Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Erasmus MC, University Medical Center Rotterdam, Rotterdam, the Netherlands (Muetzel, El Marroun, White, Tiemeier); the Department of Epidemiology, Erasmus MC, University Medical Center Rotterdam, Rotterdam, the Netherlands (Muetzel); the Department of Cognitive Neuroscience, Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition, and Behavior, Nijmegen, the Netherlands (Guimaraes, Zwiers, Buitelaar); the Imaging Genetics Center, Stevens Neuroimaging and Informatics Institute, Keck School of Medicine of USC, Marina del Rey, Calif. (Jahanshad, Thompson); National Human Genome Research Institute, Bethesda, Md. (Sudre, Shaw); the Department of Behavioral Neuroscience, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland (Earl, Fair, Nigg); the Department of Psychiatry and Forensic Medicine, Autonomous University of Barcelona, Cerdanyola del Vallès, Spain (Soliva Vila, Ramos-Quiroga, Vilarroya); Instituto ITACA, Polytechnic University of Valencia, Valencia, Spain (Vives-Gilabert); the Olin Neuropsychiatry Research Center, Hartford Hospital, Hartford, Conn. (Khadka, Novotny, Stevens); University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen (UMCG), Department of Psychiatry, Interdisciplinary Center Psychopathology and Emotion Regulation (ICPE), Groningen, the Netherlands (Hartman, Schweren); Faculty of Behavioral and Movement Sciences, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Heslenfeld); the Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, the Netherlands (Hoekstra); NICHE Lab, Department of Psychiatry, UMC Utrecht Brain Center, Utrecht, the Netherlands (Ambrosino, Oranje, de Zeeuw, Durston); Laboratory of Psychiatric Neuroimaging (LIM-21), Department and Institute of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil (Chaim-Avancini, Rosa, Zanetti, Busatto); the Center for Interdisciplinary Research on Applied Neurosciences (NAPNA), University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil (Chaim-Avancini, Rosa, Zanetti, Busatto); the Developmental Imaging Group, Murdoch Children's Research Institute, Melbourne, Australia (Malpas); the Clinical Outcomes Research Unit (CORe), Department of Medicine, Royal Melbourne Hospital, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia (Malpas); the Melbourne School of Psychological Sciences, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia (Malpas); the Child Neuropsychology Section, University Hospital RWTH Aachen, Aachen, Germany (Kohls, Konrad; Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, University Hospital RWTH Aachen, Aachen, Germany (Polier, Seitz); Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine-Brain and Behavior (INM-7), Research Center Jülich, Jülich, Germany (Polier); the Clinical and Research Programs in Pediatric Psychopharmacology and Adult ADHD, Department of Psychiatry, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston (Biederman); the Department of Psychiatry, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston (Biederman, Doyle); the Center for Genomic Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston (Doyle); the Departments of Neurosciences, Radiology, and Psychiatry and the Center for Multimodal Imaging and Genetics, University of California San Diego (Dale); the Clinical and Translational Neuroscience Laboratory, Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior, University of California Irvine, Irvine (van Erp); the Division of Behavioral Medicine and Clinical Psychology, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, and the Department of Pediatrics, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati (Epstein, Tamm); the Center for Human Development, University of California San Diego, San Diego (Jernigan); the Division of Molecular Psychiatry, Center of Mental Health, University of Würzburg, Würzburg, Germany (Ziegler, Lesch); the Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Amsterdam University Medical Centers, Amsterdam (Schrantee, Reneman); the Department of Clinical Medicine, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway (Høvik); the Division of Psychiatry, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway (Høvik, Haavik); the Department of Biological and Medical Psychology, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway (Lundervold); the K.G. Jebsen Center for Neuropsychiatric Disorders, Department of Biomedicine, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway (Lundervold, Haavik); the School of Psychology and the Department of Psychiatry, School of Medicine, and the Trinity College Institute of Neuroscience, Trinity College Dublin, Ireland (Kelly); the Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, NYU Langone Medical Center, New York (Kelly, Castellanos, Yoncheva); the Department of Psychiatry, Trinity College Dublin, Ireland (McCarthy, Skokauskas, Frodl); the Centre for Advanced Medical Imaging, St. James's Hospital, Dublin, Ireland (McCarthy); the Center for Child and Adolescent Mental Health, NTNU, Norway, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway (Skokauskas); the Center for MR Research, University Children's Hospital, and the Zurich Center for Integrative Human Physiology, Zurich (O'Gorman Tuura); Magnetic Resonance Image Core Facility, August Pi i Sunyer Biomedical Research Institute (IDIBAPS), Barcelona, Spain (Calvo, Lazaro); the Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Psychology, Institute of Neurosciences, Hospital Clinic, Barcelona, Spain (Lera-Miguel, Nicolau, Lazaro); the Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology, and Neuroscience, King's College London (Chantiluke, Christakou, Cubillo, Rubia); the School of Psychology and Clinical Language Sciences, Centre for Integrative Neuroscience and Neurodynamics, University of Reading, Reading, U.K. (Christakou); the Department of Paediatrics, University of Melbourne, Australia (Vance, Coghill, Silk); the Department of Neuroscience, Brighton and Sussex Medical School, Falmer, Brighton, U.K. (Cercignani, Gabel, Harrison); the Social, Genetic, and Developmental Psychiatry Centre, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology, and Neuroscience, King's College London (Asherson, Kuntsi); the Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Central Institute of Mental Health, Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim/Heidelberg University, Mannheim, Germany (Baumeister, Brandeis, Hohmann, Banaschewski); the Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Psychiatric Hospital, University of Zurich, Zurich (Brandeis, Brem, Walitza); the Neuroscience Center Zurich, University of Zurich and ETH Zurich, Zurich (Brandeis, Brem, Walitza); the D'Or Institute for Research and Education, Rio de Janeiro (Bramati, Tovar-Moll, Mattos); the Morphological Sciences Program, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro (Tovar-Moll); the Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, University Hospital of Tübingen, Tübingen, Germany (Fallgatter, Schwarz, Ethofer); LEAD Graduate School, University of Tübingen, Germany (Fallgatter); the Department of Biomedical Magnetic Resonance, University of Tübingen, Tübingen, Germany (Kardatzki, Ethofer); the National Medical Research Center for Children's Health, Department of Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Densitometry, Moscow (Anikin); the National Medical Research Center for Children's Health, Moscow (Baranov, Solovieva); Russian National Research Medical University, Ministry of Health and Social Development of the Russian Federation, Central Clinical Hospital MSHE, Moscow (Namazova-Baranova); the National Medical Research Center for Children's Health, Laboratory of Neurology and Cognitive Health, Moscow (Gogberashvili, Karkashadze); the National Medical Research Center for Children's Health, Department of Information Technologies, Moscow (Kapilushniy); the Department of Pediatrics, Erasmus MC-Sophia, Rotterdam, the Netherlands (El Marroun); the Department of Psychology, Education, and Child Studies, Erasmus University Rotterdam, Rotterdam, the Netherlands (El Marroun); the Department of Radiology, Erasmus MC, University Medical Center Rotterdam, Rotterdam, the Netherlands (White); Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro (Mattos); the Department of Psychiatry, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia (Coghill); the Murdoch Children's Research Institute, Melbourne, Australia (Coghill, Silk); the Division of Neuroscience, University of Dundee, Dundee, U.K. (Coghill); the Child and Adolescent Mental Health Center, Capital Region Copenhagen (Plessen); the Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Department of Psychiatry, University Hospital Lausanne, Switzerland (Plessen); the Department of Neuroimaging, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology, and Neuroscience, King's College London (Mehta, Paloyelis); Sussex Partnership NHS Foundation Trust, Swandean, East Sussex, U.K. (Harrison); the Monash Institute for Cognitive and Clinical Neurosciences (MICCN) and the School of Psychological Sciences, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia (Bellgrove); Deakin University, School of Psychology, Geelong, Australia (Silk); the Department of Medicine, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain (Lazaro); the Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Otto von Guericke University Magdeburg, Germany (Frodl); the German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases (DZNE), Germany (Frodl); Bezirksklinikum Regensburg, Germany (Zentis); the Nathan Kline Institute for Psychiatric Research, Orangeburg, N.Y. (Castellanos); the Brain Imaging Center, Amsterdam University Medical Centers, Amsterdam (Reneman); the Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Psychosomatics, and Psychotherapy, Tübingen, Germany (Conzelmann); the Department of Psychology, Biological Psychology, Clinical Psychology, and Psychotherapy, University of Würzburg, Würzburg, Germany (Conzelmann, Pauli, Baur-Streubel, Zierhut); the Laboratory of Psychiatric Neurobiology, Institute of Molecular Medicine, I.M. Sechenov First Moscow State Medical University, Moscow (Lesch); the Department of Neuroscience, School for Mental Health and Neuroscience (MHeNS), Maastricht University, Maastricht, the Netherlands (Lesch); the Department of Psychiatry, Psychosomatic Medicine, and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Frankfurt, Frankfurt, Germany (Reif); JARA Institute Molecular Neuroscience and Neuroimaging (INM-11), Institute for Neuroscience and Medicine, Research Center Jülich, Germany (Konrad); Translational Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, University Hospital RWTH Aachen, Aachen, Germany (Oberwelland Weiss); Cognitive Neuroscience (INM-3), Institute for Neuroscience and Medicine, Research Center Jülich, Germany (Oberwelland Weiss); the Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil (Busatto, Louza); the Clinical Neuropsychology Section, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Oosterlaan); Emma Children's Hospital Amsterdam Medical Center, Amsterdam (Oosterlaan); the Department of Pediatrics, VU Medical Center, Amsterdam (Oosterlaan); the Department of Psychiatry, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Conn. (Stevens); the Department of Psychiatry, Vall d'Hebron University Hospital, Barcelona, Spain (Ramos-Quiroga); Biomedical Network Research Center on Mental Health (CIBERSAM), Barcelona, Spain (Lazaro, Ramos-Quiroga); Hospital del Mar Medical Research Institute (IMIM), Barcelona, Spain (Vilarroya); the Department of Psychiatry, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland (Fair, Nigg); Karakter Child and Adolescent Psychiatry University Center, Nijmegen, the Netherlands (Buitelaar); Departments of Psychiatry and of Neuroscience and Physiology, SUNY Upstate Medical University, Syracuse, New York (Faraone); NIHM, Bethesda, Md. (Shaw); the Department of Social and Behavioral Science, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston (Tiemeier).

Objective: Neuroimaging studies show structural alterations of various brain regions in children and adults with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), although nonreplications are frequent. The authors sought to identify cortical characteristics related to ADHD using large-scale studies.

Methods: Cortical thickness and surface area (based on the Desikan-Killiany atlas) were compared between case subjects with ADHD (N=2,246) and control subjects (N=1,934) for children, adolescents, and adults separately in ENIGMA-ADHD, a consortium of 36 centers. To assess familial effects on cortical measures, case subjects, unaffected siblings, and control subjects in the NeuroIMAGE study (N=506) were compared. Associations of the attention scale from the Child Behavior Checklist with cortical measures were determined in a pediatric population sample (Generation-R, N=2,707).

Results: In the ENIGMA-ADHD sample, lower surface area values were found in children with ADHD, mainly in frontal, cingulate, and temporal regions; the largest significant effect was for total surface area (Cohen's d=-0.21). Fusiform gyrus and temporal pole cortical thickness was also lower in children with ADHD. Neither surface area nor thickness differences were found in the adolescent or adult groups. Familial effects were seen for surface area in several regions. In an overlapping set of regions, surface area, but not thickness, was associated with attention problems in the Generation-R sample.

Conclusions: Subtle differences in cortical surface area are widespread in children but not adolescents and adults with ADHD, confirming involvement of the frontal cortex and highlighting regions deserving further attention. Notably, the alterations behave like endophenotypes in families and are linked to ADHD symptoms in the population, extending evidence that ADHD behaves as a continuous trait in the population. Future longitudinal studies should clarify individual lifespan trajectories that lead to nonsignificant findings in adolescent and adult groups despite the presence of an ADHD diagnosis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1176/appi.ajp.2019.18091033DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6879185PMC
July 2019