Dr.  Ramin Hakami, PhD - George Mason University - Associate Professor

Dr. Ramin Hakami

PhD

George Mason University

Associate Professor

United States

Main Specialties: Infectious Disease

Additional Specialties: Infectious Diseases


Top Author

Dr.  Ramin Hakami, PhD - George Mason University - Associate Professor

Dr. Ramin Hakami

PhD

Introduction

Dr. Hakami obtained his Ph.D. in Biochemistry in the laboratory of the Nobel Laureate Professor Har Gobind Khorana, at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He was then awarded a NRSA fellowship from NIH and completed postdoctoral training at Harvard Medical School (HMS) and subsequently at the National Human Genome Research Institute. He is currently a tenured (Associate) Professor of Microbiology and Infectious Diseases at George Mason University. The focus of research in Dr. Hakami's laboratory is to understand the fundamental mechanisms by which vesicular transport regulates host innate immune responses during infection with highly pathogenic agents. In particular, a major focus of Dr. Hakami's research group is discovery of the molecular mechanisms by which intercellular communication through exchange of exosomes modulate innate immune responses. The broad goal of the studies is identification of mechanisms that can be targeted for development of host-based therapeutic or preventative measures.

Primary Affiliation: George Mason University - United States

Specialties:

Additional Specialties:

Metrics

Number of Publications

36

Publications

Number of Profile Views

245

Profile Views

Number of Article Reads

320

Reads

Number of Citations

809

Citations

Education

May 1995
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Ph.D.

Publications

36Publications

320Reads

809PubMed Central Citations

Discovery and Biochemical Characterization of PlyP56, PlyN74, and PlyTB40- Specific Endolysins.

Viruses 2018 05 21;10(5). Epub 2018 May 21.

Institute for Bioscience and Biotechnology Research, Rockville, MD 20850, USA.

View Article
May 2018
5 Reads
3.280 Impact Factor

S-nitrosylation of peroxiredoxin 1 contributes to viability of lung epithelial cells during Bacillus anthracis infection.

Biochim Biophys Acta Gen Subj 2017 Jan 7;1861(1 Pt A):3019-3029. Epub 2016 Sep 7.

School of Systems Biology, and the National Center for Biodefense and Infectious Diseases, George Mason University, Manassas, Virginia, USA. Electronic address:

View Article
January 2017
13 Reads
4.380 Impact Factor

Protein Phosphatase-1 regulates Rift Valley fever virus replication.

Antiviral Res 2016 Mar 20;127:79-89. Epub 2016 Jan 20.

National Center for Biodefense and Infectious Diseases, School of Systems Biology, George Mason University, Manassas, VA, USA. Electronic address:

View Article
March 2016
11 Reads
4 Citations
3.940 Impact Factor

Presence of Viral RNA and Proteins in Exosomes from Cellular Clones Resistant to Rift Valley Fever Virus Infection.

Front Microbiol 2016 11;7:139. Epub 2016 Feb 11.

National Center for Biodefense and Infectious Diseases, School of Systems Biology, George Mason University, ManassasVA, USA; Laboratory of Molecular Virology, George Mason University, ManassasVA, USA.

View Article
February 2016
7 Reads
10 Citations
3.940 Impact Factor

Extracellular vesicles from infected cells: potential for direct pathogenesis.

Front Microbiol 2015 20;6:1132. Epub 2015 Oct 20.

Laboratory of Molecular Virology, School of Systems Biology, George Mason University , Manassas, VA, USA.

View Article
November 2015
7 Reads
29 Citations
3.940 Impact Factor

A reverse-phase protein microarray-based screen identifies host signaling dynamics upon Burkholderia spp. infection.

Front Microbiol 2015 27;6:683. Epub 2015 Jul 27.

Molecular and Translational Sciences Division, United States Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases, Frederick MD, USA.

View Article
August 2015
29 Reads
5 Citations
3.940 Impact Factor

Host response during Yersinia pestis infection of human bronchial epithelial cells involves negative regulation of autophagy and suggests a modulation of survival-related and cellular growth pathways.

Front Microbiol 2015 13;6:50. Epub 2015 Feb 13.

National Center for Biodefense and Infectious Diseases and School of Systems Biology, George Mason University Manassas, VA, USA.

View Article
March 2015
21 Reads
3 Citations
3.940 Impact Factor

The carrying pigeons of the cell: exosomes and their role in infectious diseases caused by human pathogens.

Pathog Dis 2014 Jul 24;71(2):109-20. Epub 2014 Feb 24.

School of Systems Biology, The National Center for Biodefense and Infectious Diseases, George Mason University, Manassas, VA, USA.

View Article
July 2014
8 Reads
28 Citations

Exosomes and their role in CNS viral infections.

J Neurovirol 2014 Jun 28;20(3):199-208. Epub 2014 Feb 28.

National Center for Biodefense and Infectious Diseases, and School of Systems Biology, George Mason University, Manassas, Virginia, United States of America.

View Article
June 2014
6 Reads
24 Citations
2.600 Impact Factor

A dual role for SOX10 in the maintenance of the postnatal melanocyte lineage and the differentiation of melanocyte stem cell progenitors.

PLoS Genet 2013 25;9(7):e1003644. Epub 2013 Jul 25.

Genetic Disease Research Branch, National Human Genome Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, United States of America.

View Article
January 2014
6 Reads
21 Citations

Reactive oxygen species activate NFκB (p65) and p53 and induce apoptosis in RVFV infected liver cells.

Virology 2014 Jan 15;449:270-86. Epub 2013 Dec 15.

National Center for Biodefense and Infectious Diseases, and the School of Systems Biology, George Mason University, Manassas, VA, USA. Electronic address:

View Article
January 2014
10 Reads
17 Citations
3.320 Impact Factor

In vivo murine and in vitro M-like cell models of gastrointestinal anthrax.

Microbes Infect 2013 Jan 26;15(1):37-44. Epub 2012 Oct 26.

National Center for Biodefense and Infectious Diseases, George Mason University, 10650 Pyramid Place, Manassas, VA 20110, USA.

View Article
January 2013
8 Reads
4 Citations
2.860 Impact Factor

A rapid oxime linker-based library approach to identification of bivalent inhibitors of the Yersinia pestis protein-tyrosine phosphatase, YopH.

Bioorg Med Chem Lett 2010 May 15;20(9):2813-6. Epub 2010 Mar 15.

Chemical Biology Laboratory, Molecular Discovery Program, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, NCI-Frederick, Frederick, MD 21702, USA.

View Article
May 2010
18 Reads
7 Citations
2.420 Impact Factor

Gaining ground: assays for therapeutics against botulinum neurotoxin.

Trends Microbiol 2010 Apr 4;18(4):164-72. Epub 2010 Mar 4.

Faculty Research Participation Program, Oak Ridge Associated Universities, Belcamp, MD, USA.

View Article
April 2010
7 Reads
11 Citations
9.190 Impact Factor

Optimization of protein solubilization for the analysis of the CD14 human monocyte membrane proteome using LC-MS/MS.

J Proteomics 2009 Nov 24;73(1):112-22. Epub 2009 Aug 24.

Laboratory of Proteomics and Analytical Technologies, Advanced Technology Program, SAIC-Frederick, Inc., NCI at Frederick, Frederick, Maryland 21702-1201, USA.

View Article
November 2009
9 Reads
5 Citations
3.890 Impact Factor

Genetic evidence does not support direct regulation of EDNRB by SOX10 in migratory neural crest and the melanocyte lineage.

Mech Dev 2006 Feb 18;123(2):124-34. Epub 2006 Jan 18.

Genetic Disease Research Branch, National Human Genome Research Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892-4472, USA.

View Article
February 2006
12 Reads
11 Citations
2.440 Impact Factor

The importance of having your SOX on: role of SOX10 in the development of neural crest-derived melanocytes and glia.

Oncogene 2003 May;22(20):3024-34

National Human Genome Research Institute, National Institutes of Health, 49 Convent Drive, Bethesda, MD 20892-4472, USA.

View Article
May 2003
16 Reads
40 Citations
8.460 Impact Factor

Analysis of SOX10 function in neural crest-derived melanocyte development: SOX10-dependent transcriptional control of dopachrome tautomerase.

Dev Biol 2001 Sep;237(2):245-57

Genetic Disease Research Branch, National Human Genome Research Institute, Bethesda, Maryland 20892, USA.

View Article
September 2001
8 Reads
34 Citations
3.550 Impact Factor

Mutations in Drosophila heat shock cognate 4 are enhancers of Polycomb.

Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 2001 Mar;98(7):3958-63

Department of Biological Chemistry and Molecular Pharmacology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA.

View Article
March 2001
6 Reads
9 Citations
9.810 Impact Factor

Evidence for long range allosteric interactions between the extracellular and cytoplasmic parts of bacteriorhodopsin from the mutant R82A and its second site revertant R82A/G231C.

J Biol Chem 2000 May;275(18):13431-40

Biophysics Group, Department of Physics, Freie Universität Berlin, Arnimallee 14, D-14195 Berlin, Germany. USA.

View Article
May 2000
6 Reads
9 Citations
4.570 Impact Factor

Time-resolved site-directed spin-labeling studies of bacteriorhodopsin: loop-specific conformational changes in M.

Biochemistry 2000 Feb;39(5):1120-7

Departments of Biology and Chemistry, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA.

View Article
February 2000
5 Reads
9 Citations
3.020 Impact Factor

Stabilization of chromatin structure by PRC1, a Polycomb complex.

Cell 1999 Jul;98(1):37-46

Department of Molecular Biology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston 02114, USA.

View Article
July 1999
7 Reads
250 Citations
32.240 Impact Factor

Structure of the interhelical loops and carboxyl terminus of bacteriorhodopsin by X-ray diffraction using site-directed heavy-atom labeling.

Biochemistry 1998 Jul;37(29):10411-9

Biophysics Group, Department of Physics, Freie Universität Berlin, Germany.

View Article
July 1998
6 Reads
3.020 Impact Factor

Structure and function in rhodopsin: expression of functional mammalian opsin in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 1996 Oct;93(21):11482-6

Department of Biology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge 02139, USA.

View Article
October 1996
5 Reads
8 Citations
9.810 Impact Factor

Proton transport by a bacteriorhodopsin mutant, aspartic acid-85-->asparagine, initiated in the unprotonated Schiff base state.

Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 1995 Dec;92(25):11519-23

Department of Physics, Freie Universität Berlin, Germany.

View Article
December 1995
5 Reads
6 Citations
9.810 Impact Factor

Intramolecular charge transfer in the bacteriorhodopsin mutants Asp85-->Asn and Asp212-->Asn: effects of pH and anions.

Biophys J 1995 Nov;69(5):2074-83

Department of Physics, Freie Universität Berlin, Germany.

View Article
November 1995
4 Reads
6 Citations
3.970 Impact Factor

Site directed spin labeling studies of structure and dynamics in bacteriorhodopsin.

Biophys Chem 1995 Sep-Oct;56(1-2):89-94

Institut für Biophysik, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Germany.

View Article
October 1995
5 Reads
7 Citations
1.990 Impact Factor

Rapid long-range proton diffusion along the surface of the purple membrane and delayed proton transfer into the bulk.

Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 1995 Jan;92(2):372-6

Department of Physics, Freie Universität, Berlin, Germany.

View Article
January 1995
6 Reads
42 Citations
9.810 Impact Factor

Time-resolved detection of structural changes during the photocycle of spin-labeled bacteriorhodopsin.

Science 1994 Oct;266(5182):105-7

Institut für Biophysik, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Germany.

View Article
October 1994
5 Reads
33 Citations
31.480 Impact Factor

X-ray diffraction of a cysteine-containing bacteriorhodopsin mutant and its mercury derivative. Localization of an amino acid residue in the loop of an integral membrane protein.

Biochemistry 1993 Nov;32(47):12830-4

Department of Biology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge 02139.

View Article
November 1993
5 Reads
3 Citations
3.020 Impact Factor

Gene replacement in Halobacterium halobium and expression of bacteriorhodopsin mutants.

Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 1993 Mar;90(5):1987-91

Department of Biology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge 02139.

View Article
March 1993
7 Reads
22 Citations
9.810 Impact Factor

Biochim Biophys Acta. 2017 Jan;1861(1 Pt A):3019-3029

View Article
4 Reads