Publications by authors named "Ramadhan B Matondo"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Atypical E2f functions are critical for pancreas polyploidization.

PLoS One 2018 12;13(1):e0190899. Epub 2018 Jan 12.

Department of Pathobiology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Utrecht University, Utrecht, The Netherlands.

The presence of polyploid cells in the endocrine and exocrine pancreas has been reported for four decades. In rodents, pancreatic polyploidization is initiated after weaning and the number of polyploid cells increases with age. Surprisingly the molecular regulators and biological functions of polyploidization in the pancreas are still unknown. We discovered that atypical E2f activity is essential for polyploidization in the pancreas, using an inducible Cre/LoxP approach in new-born mice to delete ubiquitously the atypical E2f transcription factors, E2f7 and E2f8. In contrast to its critical role in embryonic survival, conditional deletion of both of both atypical E2fs in newborn mice had no impact on postnatal survival and mice lived until old age. However, deficiency of E2f7 or E2f8 alone was sufficient to suppress polyploidization in the pancreas and associated with only a minor decrease in blood serum levels of glucose, insulin, amylase and lipase under 4 hours starvation condition compared to wildtype littermates. In mice with fewer pancreatic polyploid cells that were fed ad libitum, no major impact on hormones or enzymes levels was observed. In summary, we identified atypical E2fs to be essential for polyploidization in the pancreas and discovered that postnatal induced loss of both atypical E2fs in many organs is compatible with life until old age.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0190899PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5766144PMC
February 2018

E2f8 mediates tumor suppression in postnatal liver development.

J Clin Invest 2016 08 25;126(8):2955-69. Epub 2016 Jul 25.

E2F-mediated transcriptional repression of cell cycle-dependent gene expression is critical for the control of cellular proliferation, survival, and development. E2F signaling also interacts with transcriptional programs that are downstream of genetic predictors for cancer development, including hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Here, we evaluated the function of the atypical repressor genes E2f7 and E2f8 in adult liver physiology. Using several loss-of-function alleles in mice, we determined that combined deletion of E2f7 and E2f8 in hepatocytes leads to HCC. Temporal-specific ablation strategies revealed that E2f8's tumor suppressor role is critical during the first 2 weeks of life, which correspond to a highly proliferative stage of postnatal liver development. Disruption of E2F8's DNA binding activity phenocopied the effects of an E2f8 null allele and led to HCC. Finally, a profile of chromatin occupancy and gene expression in young and tumor-bearing mice identified a set of shared targets for E2F7 and E2F8 whose increased expression during early postnatal liver development is associated with HCC progression in mice. Increased expression of E2F8-specific target genes was also observed in human liver biopsies from HCC patients compared to healthy patients. In summary, these studies suggest that E2F8-mediated transcriptional repression is a critical tumor suppressor mechanism during postnatal liver development.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1172/JCI85506DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4966321PMC
August 2016

Surgical resection and radiofrequency ablation initiate cancer in cytokeratin-19+- liver cells deficient for p53 and Rb.

Oncotarget 2016 Aug;7(34):54662-54675

Department of Pathobiology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Utrecht University, Utrecht, The Netherlands.

The long term prognosis of liver cancer patients remains unsatisfactory because of cancer recurrence after surgical interventions, particularly in patients with viral infections. Since hepatitis B and C viral proteins lead to inactivation of the tumor suppressors p53 and Retinoblastoma (Rb), we hypothesize that surgery in the context of p53/Rb inactivation initiate de novo tumorigenesis.We, therefore, generated transgenic mice with hepatocyte and cholangiocyte/liver progenitor cell (LPC)-specific deletion of p53 and Rb, by interbreeding conditional p53/Rb knockout mice with either Albumin-cre or Cytokeratin-19-cre transgenic mice.We show that liver cancer develops at the necrotic injury site after surgical resection or radiofrequency ablation in p53/Rb deficient livers. Cancer initiation occurs as a result of specific migration, expansion and transformation of cytokeratin-19+-liver (CK-19+) cells. At the injury site migrating CK-19+ cells formed small bile ducts and adjacent cells strongly expressed the transforming growth factor β (TGFβ). Isolated cytokeratin-19+ cells deficient for p53/Rb were resistant against hypoxia and TGFβ-mediated growth inhibition. CK-19+ specific deletion of p53/Rb verified that carcinomas at the injury site originates from cholangiocytes or liver progenitor cells.These findings suggest that human liver patients with hepatitis B and C viral infection or with mutations for p53 and Rb are at high risk to develop tumors at the surgical intervention site.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.18632/oncotarget.9952DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5342371PMC
August 2016

Deletion of the serotonin transporter in rats disturbs serotonin homeostasis without impairing liver regeneration.

Am J Physiol Gastrointest Liver Physiol 2009 Apr 26;296(4):G963-8. Epub 2009 Feb 26.

Department of Pathobiology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Utrecht University, Yalelaan 1, 3508 TD Utrecht, The Netherlands.

The serotonin transporter is implicated in the uptake of the vasoconstrictor serotonin from the circulation into the platelets, where 95% of all blood serotonin is stored and released in response to vascular injury. In vivo studies indicated that platelet-derived serotonin mediates liver regeneration after partial hepatectomy. We have recently generated serotonin transporter knockout rats and demonstrated that their platelets were almost completely depleted of serotonin. Here we show that these rats exhibit impaired hemostasis and contain about 1-6% of wild-type serotonin levels in the blood. Despite the marked reduction of serotonin levels in blood and platelets, efficient liver regeneration and collagen-induced platelet aggregation occur in rats lacking the serotonin transporter. These results provide evidence that liver regeneration is not dependent on the release of serotonin from platelets. Our findings indicate that very low levels of serotonin in blood are sufficient for liver regeneration.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1152/ajpgi.90709.2008DOI Listing
April 2009