DR Rama Krishna Alla, MSc., PhD., FAGE - Vishnu Dental College - Assistant Professor in Dental Materials

DR Rama Krishna Alla

MSc., PhD., FAGE

Vishnu Dental College

Assistant Professor in Dental Materials

Bhimavaram, Andhra Pradesh | India

Main Specialties: Dentistry

Additional Specialties: Dental Biomaterials

ORCID logohttps://orcid.org/0000-0002-0668-4605


Top Author

DR Rama Krishna Alla, MSc., PhD., FAGE - Vishnu Dental College - Assistant Professor in Dental Materials

DR Rama Krishna Alla

MSc., PhD., FAGE

Introduction

Currently working in the Department of Dental Materials at Vishnu Dental College, Bhimavaram, India.

My current profile is teaching dental materials to both undergraduate and postgraduate students and training postgraduate students in their research and dissertation work.

My current research project is "characterization of nanoparticles in Dental Materials for various applications in Dentistry".

Primary Affiliation: Vishnu Dental College - Bhimavaram, Andhra Pradesh , India

Specialties:

Additional Specialties:

Research Interests:


View DR Rama Krishna Alla’s Resume / CV

Experience

Aug 2011
Assistant Professor in Dental Materials
Academics, Research and Administration
Nov 2008
Assistant Professor in Dental Materials
Academics, Research
Jul 2007
Lecturer in Dental Materials
Academics, Research
Jul 2007
Lecturer in Dental Materials
Academics
Jul 2003
Lecturer in Dental Materials
Academics, Administration
Nov 2001
Lecturer in Dental Materials
Academics, Administration

Publications

19Publications

44Reads

11Profile Views

5PubMed Central Citations

The 100 most cited articles in prosthodontic journals: A bibliometric analysis of articles published between 1951 and 2019.

J Prosthet Dent 2019 Aug 29. Epub 2019 Aug 29.

Associate Professor, Department of Public Health Dentistry, Mallareddy Dental College for Women, Hyderabad, India.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.prosdent.2019.05.014DOI Listing
August 2019
1.419 Impact Factor

Antimicrobial activity and properties of irreversible hydrocolloid impression materials incorporated with silver nanoparticles.

J Prosthet Dent 2016 Jun 13;115(6):722-8. Epub 2016 Jan 13.

Associate Professor, Department of Dental Materials, Manipal College of Dental Sciences, Manipal University, Manipal, India.

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S00223913150063
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.prosdent.2015.11.006DOI Listing
June 2016
40 Reads
1.420 Impact Factor

Immunolocalization of CD34 Positive Progenitor Cells in Diabetic and Non Diabetic Periodontitis Patients - A Comparative Study.

J Clin Diagn Res 2014 Nov 20;8(11):ZC96-9. Epub 2014 Nov 20.

Senior Lecturer, Department of Public Health Dentistry, Vishnu Dental College , Bhimavaram, Andhra Pradesh, India .

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http://dx.doi.org/10.7860/JCDR/2014/9827.5191DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4290284PMC
November 2014
2 Reads

Immunolocalization of CD34 Positive Progenitor Cells in Diabetic and Non Diabetic Periodontitis Patients - A Comparative Study

J Clinical and Diagnos Res, 2014; 8(11): ZC96-ZC99.

J Clinical and Diagnos Res

Background: Little research has been documented to determine the CD34 positive cells in healthy periodontium, chronic periodontitis and in chronic periodontitis with diabetes mellitus individuals. Aim: The aim of the present study was to evaluate and compare the CD34 positive progenitor cells of the gingiva in patients with healthy periodontium, chronic periodontitis and chronic periodontitis with Diabetes Mellitus. Materials and Methods: A total number of 75 patients were divided into 3 groups which included Group I (healthy periodontium), Group II (chronic periodontitis) and Group III (chronic periodontitis with diabetes mellitus). Periodontal examination included Plaque index, Gingival index, Gingival bleeding index, Probing pocket depth and Clinical attachment levels. Gingival biopsies were collected from each participant and they were fixed in formalin embedded in paraffin which was later subjected to immunohistochemical procedure with anti-CD34 (a stemness marker). T-Test and Regression analysis (R-square) was used to analyse the data. Results: The mean number of CD34 positive cells were higher in group III (5.71±1.97) compared to Group chronic periodontitis group I (4.98± 2.08) and II (4.48± 1.24). Conclusion: Although CD34 is a non specific stemness marker, results suggest that there is a significant difference in the number of CD34 positive progenitor cells between Group II and Group III but no significant difference was observed between Group I, II and Group I, III.

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November 2014

Evaluation and comparision of marginal fit of provisional restoration fabricated using light cure acrylic resin with other commercially available temporary crown resin materials”,

Trends Biomater. Artif Organs, 2014; 28(2):47-51

Trends Biomaterials and Artificial Organs

The purpose of the present in vitro study is to evaluate and comparision of marginal fit of provisional restoration fabricated using light cure acrylic resin with other commercially available temporary resin crown materials. A total of 60 stone dies were prepared and they were divided into three groups 20 dies for each material to be tested. 3 provisional restorative materials involved in the study are cold cure acrylic resin, Protemp – II and Revotek LC. 10 samples from each group were subjected to thermocycling for 2500 cycles between 5°C and 55°C with a dwell time of 5 seconds in each water bath. The difference in marginal discrepancy at the 3 points on each surface before and after water absorption and thermocycling were evaluated using a traveling microscope. The marginal discrepancy was significantly different among the groups according to ANOVA F-test after thermocycling and water immersion respectively. The provisional restorative materials used in this study showed some marginal discrepancy before and after thermalcycling and water immersion But GC Light cure acrylic resin had a better fit when compared to Cold Cure acrylic resin and Protemp – II provisional restorative materials before and after thermocycling and water immersion.

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June 2014
1 Read

Assessment of thickness of palatal masticatory mucosa and maximum graft dimensions at palatal vault associated with age and gender - a clinical study.

J Clin Diagn Res 2014 May 15;8(5):ZC09-13. Epub 2014 May 15.

Senior Lecturer, Department of Periodontics, CSI College of Dental Science , Madurai, India .

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http://dx.doi.org/10.7860/JCDR/2014/8703.4314DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4080056PMC
May 2014
1 Citation

Nitric Oxide – “A Double Edged Sword”

Trends Biomater. Artif Organs, 2014; 28(1): 37-43

Trends Biomaterials and Artificial Organs

This review emphasizes the role and production of Nitric oxide (NO) and its regulation under physiological and pathological conditions. Nitric Oxide (NO) is a short-lived gaseous free radical produced by Nitric oxide synthase and an important signaling molecule with pleotropic physiological activities including vasodilation, neurotransmission, microbial, tumour cell killing and antioxidant activity. NO and its derived chemical species have some deleterious effects like inhibition of enzyme functions, alteration of DNA, induction of lipid peroxidation, mutation of tumour suppressor genes, cytotoxicity, inhibition of mitochondrial respiration, depletion of antioxidant stores and hypoxia induced angiogenesis in cancer thus role of NO is clearly seen in the oral cancer and oral diseases. Hence, with the regulation of NO overproduction may aid in treating the diseases without affecting its normal physiologic levels.

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March 2014
3 Reads

An Overview of Orthodontic Wires

Trends Biomater. Artif. Organs, 28(1), 32-36 (2014)

Trends in Biomaterials and Artificial Organs

Orthodontic wires are components of fixed appliances used to carry out the necessary tooth movements as part of orthodontic treatment. A variety of materials like metals, alloys, polymers and composites are used to produce orthodontic wires. The properties of orthodontic wires are evaluated by various laboratory tests like tensile, torsional, and bending tests. However, oral conditions may influence their behaviour and it is important for the clinician to understand the properties of orthodontic wires as well as their clinical implications to turn out optimal results. This article reviews different materials used for manufacturing orthodontic wires and their properties along with clinical implications.

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March 2014
4 Reads

Dental Composite – A Versatile Restorative Material: An Overview

Ind J Dent Sci., 2013; 5(5):111-115.

Indian Journal of Dental Sciences

Composite resin restorative materials were developed to overcome the disadvantages of amalgam restorative materials. Dental amalgams are unesthetic, and toxic. Composite resins are filled resins and they exhibit high compressive strength, abrasion resistance, ease of application and high translucency. Depending on the filler size and shapes, various composites have been developed till now. This article is a review of various types of composites and their properties.

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December 2013
1 Read

NON-CARIOUS LESIONS DUE TO TOOTH SURFACE LOSS: A REVIEW

Dental Era - A Journal of Dentistry, 2013; 3(3): 35-40

Dental Era - A Journal of Dentistry

Tooth surface loss is a process that results in non-carious lesions. Several categories of tooth surface loss exist, including erosion, attrition, abrasion, and abfraction. There can be many causes of this condition, including bruxism, clenching, disease, dietary factors, habits and lifestyle, incorrect tooth brushing, abrasive dentifrices, the craniofacial complex, iatrogenic dentistry, and aging. Determining the etiology of tooth surface loss can be difficult but is possible through observation of the pattern of tooth surface loss on the teeth and is necessary for treatment planning to prevent failure. Management of this process includes prevention, tooth remineralization, and active treatment by restoring the involved teeth. Treatment can range from minimally invasive and adhesive dentistry, to full mouth rehabilitation, to restoring the lost vertical height.

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September 2013
2 Reads

Changes in Vertical Dimension of Complete Dentures Due to Rebasing with Different Techniques

World J Dent 2013;4(2):96-99.

World Journal of Dentistry

Dental literature is devoid of information in respect of altered incisal pin relation due to compression molding in a single denture. It is to be reckoned that in rebasing technique, the entire segment of teeth remain fixed through a matrix of set polymethylmethacrylate that binds all the teeth. Thus, the artificial teeth do not remain as individual but act as a single unified unit of all the teeth. In view of lack of information in change in vertical dimension due to rebasing procedures and with the aim of determining the method of rebasing that result in minimal changes in occlusal discrepancy, the study was undertaken to evaluate the changes in vertical dimension of occlusion after rebasing using two different methods.

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August 2013
1 Read

Changes In Fit Of Denture Bases After Rebasing With Different Techniques

J Ind Prosthodont Soc, Supple 2013; 71 - 76.

J lndjan Prosthodont Sac

In view of lack of information on accuracy of fit of rebased dentures and with the aim of determining the method of rebasing that result in minimal changes in fit, the study was undertaken to evaluate the fit of maxillary complete dentures after rebasing using two different methods.

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March 2013
2 Reads

Influence of Fiber Reinforcement on the Properties Of Denture Base Resins

J Biomater Nanobiotech, 2013, 4, 91-97

Journal of Biomaterials and Nanobiotechnology, 2013, 4, 91-97

prolonged the human life with a drastic increase in the number of elderly in the past few decades. Tooth loss is one of the manifestations of aging. Dentures and dental implants are the major prosthetic devices given to restore physiological and esthetic functions of oral tissues of edentulous or partially edentulous patients. Complete and partial dentures based on polymeric compositions are the most popular devices since the cost of dental implants and metal-base dentures are much higher. Among the polymers, poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) is the most commonly used material for this purpose. Although, this material is not ideal in every respect, it is the combination of qualities rather than one single desirable property that accounts for its popularity and usage. One of the main drawbacks of this material is considered to be its poor mechanical performance. There have been several attempts in the recent past to address the problem of inferior mechanical properties of these materials. Generally, there are three ways which have been investigated to im- prove the mechanical properties of denture bases; search for or development of an alternative material to PMMA; chemical modification of PMMA; and the reinforcement of PMMA. Present article is a review of types of fibres rein- forced in denture prosthesis and their effects on mechanical properties of denture prosthesis.

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January 2013
2 Reads

Titanium - A Miracle Metal In Dentistry

Trends Biomater. Artif. Organs 2013; 27(1):

Trends Biomaterials Artificial Organs

Since the introduction of titanium and titanium alloys in the early 1950s, these materials in a relatively short time have become backbone materials for the aerospace, energy, and chemical industries. Titanium and its alloys are used in dentistry as prosthetic appliances because of its unique combination of chemical, physical, and biological properties. Cast and wrought form of titanium are used in dentistry. The basic properties of titanium like biocompatibility, corrosion, strength, shape memory etc are discussed in detail. These properties of titanium make it the miracle metal in dentistry.

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January 2013
2 Reads

Local and systemic effects of unpolymerised monomers.

Dent Res J (Isfahan) 2010 ;7(2):82-7

Assistant Professor, Department of Prostodontics, School of Dentistry, Al-Fateh University, Tripoli Libya, Libyan Arab Jamahiriya.

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3177373PMC
November 2011
2 Reads
4 Citations

Top co-authors

Ramesh Ksv
Ramesh Ksv

Vishnu Dental College

1
Praveen Gadde
Praveen Gadde

Vishnu Dental College

1
Krishnan V
Krishnan V

Annamalai University

1
Mythili R
Mythili R

Rajah Muthaiah Dental College & Hospital

1
Sitaramaraju Dv
Sitaramaraju Dv

Vishnu Dental College

1