Publications by authors named "Ralph J A Maas"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

CD34 progenitor-derived NK cell and gemcitabine combination therapy increases killing of ovarian cancer cells in NOD/SCID/IL2Rg mice.

Oncoimmunology 2021 1;10(1):1981049. Epub 2021 Oct 1.

Department of Laboratory Medicine, Laboratory of Hematology, Radboud University Medical Center/Radboud Institute for Molecular Life Sciences, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.

Combining natural killer (NK) cell adoptive transfer with tumor-sensitizing chemotherapy is an attractive approach against recurrent ovarian cancer (OC), as OC is sensitive to NK cell-mediated immunity. Previously, we showed that CD34 hematopoietic progenitor cell (HPC)-derived NK cells can kill OC cells and inhibit OC tumor growth in mice. Here, we investigated the potential of HPC-NK cell therapy combined with chemotherapeutic gemcitabine (used in recurrent OC patients) against OC. We examined the phenotypical, functional, and cytotoxic effects of gemcitabine on HPC-NK cells and/or OC cells and in OC-bearing mice. To this end, we treated OC cells and/or HPC-NK cells with or without gemcitabine and analyzed the phenotype, cytokine production, and anti-tumor reactivity. We found that gemcitabine did not affect the phenotype and functionality of HPC-NK cells, while on OC cells expression of NK cell activating ligands and death receptors was upregulated. Although gemcitabine pre-treatment of OC cells did not improve the functionality of HPC-NK cells, importantly, HPC-NK cells and gemcitabine additively killed OC cells . Similarly, combined HPC-NK cell and gemcitabine treatment additively decreased tumor growth in OC-bearing mice. Collectively, our results indicate that combination therapy of HPC-NK cells and gemcitabine results in augmented OC killing and . This provides a rationale for exploring this therapeutic strategy in patients with recurrent OC.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/2162402X.2021.1981049DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8489932PMC
October 2021

Human recombinant interleukin-38 suppresses inflammation in mouse models of local and systemic disease.

Cytokine 2021 01 28;137:155334. Epub 2020 Oct 28.

Department of Medicine, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, CO, USA; Department of Internal Medicine, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, The Netherlands. Electronic address:

Interleukin (IL)-38 belongs to the IL-1 family and is part of the IL-36 subfamily due to its binding to the IL-36 Receptor (IL-1R6). In the current study, we assessed the anti-inflammatory properties of IL-38 in murine models of arthritis and systemic inflammation. First, the anti-inflammatory properties of mouse and human IL-38 precursors were compared to forms with a truncated N-terminus. In mouse bone marrow derived dendritic cells (BMDC), human and mouse IL-38 precursors with a truncation of the two N-terminal amino acids (3-152) suppressed LPS-induced IL-6. Recombinant human IL-38 (3-152) was further investigated for its immunomodulatory potential using four murine models of inflammatory disease: streptococcal cell wall (SCW)-induced arthritis, monosodium urate (MSU) crystal-induced arthritis, MSU crystal-induced peritonitis, and systemic endotoxemia. In each of these models IL-38 significantly reduced inflammation. In SCW and MSU crystal-induced arthritis, joint swelling, inflammatory cell influx, and synovial levels of IL-1β, IL-6, and KC were reduced by 50% or greater. These suppressive properties of IL-38 in SCW-induced arthritis were independent of the anti-inflammatory co-receptor IL-1R8, as IL-38 reduced arthritis equally in IL-1R8 deficient and WT mice. In MSU crystal-induced peritonitis, IL-38 reduced hypothermia, while plasma IL-6 and KC and peritoneal KC levels were reduced by 65-70%. In the LPS endotoxemia model, IL-38 pretreatment reduced systemic IL-6, TNFα and KC. Furthermore, in ex vivo cultured bone marrow, LPS-induced IL-6, TNFα and KC were reduced by 75-90%. Overall, IL-38 exhibits broad anti-inflammatory properties in models of systemic and local inflammation and therefore may be an effective cytokine therapy.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cyto.2020.155334DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7725974PMC
January 2021

Cell migration through three-dimensional confining pores: speed accelerations by deformation and recoil of the nucleus.

Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci 2019 08 1;374(1779):20180225. Epub 2019 Jul 1.

Department of Cell Biology, Radboud University Medical Center, 6525 GA Nijmegen, The Netherlands.

Directional cell migration in dense three-dimensional (3D) environments critically depends upon shape adaptation and is impeded depending on the size and rigidity of the nucleus. Accordingly, the nucleus is primarily understood as a physical obstacle; however, its pro-migratory functions by stepwise deformation and reshaping remain unclear. Using atomic force spectroscopy, time-lapse fluorescence microscopy and shape change analysis tools, we determined the nuclear size, deformability, morphology and shape change of HT1080 fibrosarcoma cells expressing the Fucci cell cycle indicator or being pre-treated with chromatin-decondensating agent TSA. We show oscillating peak accelerations during migration through 3D collagen matrices and microdevices that occur during shape reversion of deformed nuclei (recoil), and increase with confinement. During G1 cell-cycle phase, nucleus stiffness was increased and yielded further increased speed fluctuations together with sustained cell migration rates in confinement when compared to interphase populations or to periods of intrinsic nuclear softening in the S/G2 cell-cycle phase. Likewise, nuclear softening by pharmacological chromatin decondensation or after lamin A/C depletion reduced peak oscillations in confinement. In conclusion, deformation and recoil of the stiff nucleus contributes to saltatory locomotion in dense tissues. This article is part of a discussion meeting issue 'Forces in cancer: interdisciplinary approaches in tumour mechanobiology'.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1098/rstb.2018.0225DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6627020PMC
August 2019
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