Publications by authors named "Rald V M Groven"

3 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

miRNAs Related to Different Processes of Fracture Healing: An Integrative Overview.

Front Surg 2021 19;8:786564. Epub 2021 Nov 19.

Department of Cell Biology-Inspired Tissue Engineering, MERLN Institute for Technology-Inspired Regenerative Medicine, Maastricht University, Maastricht, Netherlands.

Fracture healing is a complex, dynamic process that is directed by cellular communication and requires multiple cell types, such as osteoblasts, osteoclasts, and immune cells. Physiological fracture healing can be divided into several phases that consist of different processes, such as angiogenesis, osteogenesis, and bone resorption/remodelling. This is needed to guarantee proper bone regeneration after fracture. Communication and molecular regulation between different cell types and within cells is therefore key in successfully orchestrating these processes to ensure adequate bone healing. Among others, microRNAs (miRNAs) play an important role in cellular communication. microRNAs are small, non-coding RNA molecules of ~22 nucleotides long that can greatly influence gene expression by post-transcriptional regulation. Over the course of the past decade, more insights have been gained in the field of miRNAs and their role in cellular signalling in both inter- and intracellular pathways. The interplay between miRNAs and their mRNA targets, and the effect thereof on different processes and aspects within fracture healing, have shown to be interesting research topics with possible future diagnostic and therapeutic potential. Considering bone regeneration, research moreover focusses on specific microRNAs and their involvement in individual pathways. However, it is required to combine these data to gain more understanding on the effects of miRNAs in the dynamic process of fracture healing, and to enhance their translational application in research, as well as in the clinic. Therefore, this review aims to provide an integrative overview on miRNAs in fracture healing, related to several key aspects in the fracture healing cascade. A special focus will be put on hypoxia, angiogenesis, bone resorption, osteoclastogenesis, mineralization, osteogenesis, osteoblastogenesis, osteocytogenesis, and chondrogenesis.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fsurg.2021.786564DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8639603PMC
November 2021

Appropriateness of empirical antibiotic therapy and added value of adjunctive gentamicin in patients with septic shock: a prospective cohort study in the ICU.

Infect Dis (Lond) 2021 Nov 22;53(11):830-838. Epub 2021 Jun 22.

Department of Intensive Care Medicine, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht, The Netherlands.

Objectives: To determine the appropriateness of empiric antibiotic therapy and the possible benefit of adding short-course gentamicin in septic shock patients with abdominal, urogenital, or an unknown focus. Secondary objectives were the effect of gentamicin addition on shock reversal and the incidence of a fungal infection.

Methods: Microbiological cultures, antibiotic treatment, and antibiotic resistance patterns of the cultured microorganisms were recorded during the first 5 days of admission. Inappropriate antibiotic therapy was defined as a prescription within the first 24 h that did not cover cultured bacteria during the first 5 days of admission and was determined in the overall group and in patients receiving adjunctive gentamicin (combination therapy) versus patients receiving monotherapy. Binomial logistic regression analysis was used to investigate the association of gentamicin addition with shock reversal.

Results: Of 203 septic shock patients, with abdominal ( = 143), urogenital ( = 27) or unknown ( = 33) focus, 115 patients received monotherapy, and 88 patients received combination therapy. Inappropriate therapy occurred in 29 patients (14%), more frequently in monotherapy (17%) versus combination therapy (10%). Combination therapy would have been effective in 55% of patients with inappropriate monotherapy. We found no association between gentamicin addition and shock reversal ( = .223). A fungal infection was present in 22 patients (11%).

Conclusion: Inappropriate empirical antibiotic therapy occurs in 17% of septic shock patients receiving monotherapy. In 55% of these patients, additional gentamicin would have resulted in appropriate therapy. When clinical course is unfavourable, lowering the threshold for administering adjunctive aminoglycoside and antifungal therapy should be considered.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/23744235.2021.1942543DOI Listing
November 2021

Serial measurements in COVID-19-induced acute respiratory disease to unravel heterogeneity of the disease course: design of the Maastricht Intensive Care COVID cohort (MaastrICCht).

BMJ Open 2020 09 29;10(9):e040175. Epub 2020 Sep 29.

Department of Intensive Care, Maastricht University Medical Center+, Maastricht, The Netherlands.

Introduction: The course of the disease in SARS-CoV-2 infection in mechanically ventilated patients is unknown. To unravel the clinical heterogeneity of the SARS-CoV-2 infection in these patients, we designed the prospective observational Maastricht Intensive Care COVID cohort (MaastrICCht). We incorporated serial measurements that harbour aetiological, diagnostic and predictive information. The study aims to investigate the heterogeneity of the natural course of critically ill patients with a SARS-CoV-2 infection.

Methods And Analysis: Mechanically ventilated patients admitted to the intensive care with a SARS-CoV-2 infection will be included. We will collect clinical variables, vital parameters, laboratory variables, mechanical ventilator settings, chest electrical impedance tomography, ECGs, echocardiography as well as other imaging modalities to assess heterogeneity of the course of a SARS-CoV-2 infection in critically ill patients. The MaastrICCht is also designed to foster various other studies and registries and intends to create an open-source database for investigators. Therefore, a major part of the data collection is aligned with an existing national intensive care data registry and two international COVID-19 data collection initiatives. Additionally, we create a flexible design, so that additional measures can be added during the ongoing study based on new knowledge obtained from the rapidly growing body of evidence. The spread of the COVID-19 pandemic requires the swift implementation of observational research to unravel heterogeneity of the natural course of the disease of SARS-CoV-2 infection in mechanically ventilated patients. Our study design is expected to enhance aetiological, diagnostic and prognostic understanding of the disease. This paper describes the design of the MaastrICCht.

Ethics And Dissemination: Ethical approval has been obtained from the medical ethics committee (Medisch Ethische Toetsingscommissie 2020-1565/3 00 523) of the Maastricht University Medical Centre+ (Maastricht UMC+), which will be performed based on the Declaration of Helsinki. During the pandemic, the board of directors of Maastricht UMC+ adopted a policy to inform patients and ask their consent to use the collected data and to store serum samples for COVID-19 research purposes. All study documentation will be stored securely for fifteen years after recruitment of the last patient. The results will be published in peer-reviewed academic journals, with a preference for open access journals, while particularly considering deposition of the manuscripts on a preprint server early.

Trial Registration Number: The Netherlands Trial Register (NL8613).
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmjopen-2020-040175DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7526030PMC
September 2020
-->