Dr Rajendra Parajuli, PhD - Dept of Biology - Research Associate

Dr Rajendra Parajuli

PhD

Dept of Biology

Research Associate

Ottawa, Ontario | Canada

Main Specialties: Epidemiology

Additional Specialties: Environmental Health

ORCID logohttps://orcid.org/0000-0002-4899-7212


Top Author

Dr Rajendra Parajuli, PhD - Dept of Biology - Research Associate

Dr Rajendra Parajuli

PhD

Introduction

A hardworking, motivated, and resilient person. Always up for a challenge and love learning new things, my interests lie in multiple areas like: #Genetic/ Environmental Epidemiology/ GxE Interaction/ Environmental Health

#Desk Research: Data mining, Modelings & Statistical Analysis (using most of common methods) with SPSS

Primary Affiliation: Dept of Biology - Ottawa, Ontario , Canada

Specialties:

Additional Specialties:

Research Interests:


View Dr Rajendra Parajuli’s Resume / CV

Education

Apr 2010
University of Tokyo
PhD
Apr 2005 - Mar 2007
University of Tokyo
MHSc
Dept of Human Ecology
Jul 2002 - Jun 2004
Tribhuvan University
MA (RD)
Dept of Rural Development
Jul 2000 - Jun 2002
Tribhuvan University Institute of Science and Technology
MSc Zoology
Dept of Zoology
Jul 1997 - Jun 2000
Tribhuvan University
B Sc (Bio)
Dept of Zoology

Experience

Aug 2017
UOttawa
Research Associate
Currently
Mar 2017
McGill
Research Associate
From 2014 Oct_2.5 Years
Mar 2013 - Mar 2014
University of Tokyo
Postdoctoral Fellow
Dept of Human Ecology
Mar 2014
University of Tokyo
Postdoc
From 2013 April for 1 Year
Apr 2011 - Mar 2013
National Center for Child Health and Development
Research Fellow
Dept of Social Medicine
Mar 2013
NCCHD
Research Fellow
From 2011 March for 2 Year
Mar 2011
University of Tokyo
Postdoc
From 2010 June_For 1 Year
Aug 2017
University of Ottawa
Research Associate II
Department of Biology
Jul 2017
University of Victoria
Adjunct Asst Professor
Child and Youth Care
Oct 2014
McGill University
Postdoc
Natural Resource Science

Publications

16Publications

414Reads

10Profile Views

46PubMed Central Citations

Genetic polymorphisms are associated with exposure biomarkers for metals and persistent organic pollutants among Inuit from the Inuvialuit Settlement Region, Canada.

Sci Total Environ 2018 Sep 7;634:569-578. Epub 2018 Apr 7.

Faculty of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec H9X 3V9, Canada; Department of Environmental Health Sciences, University of Michigan School of Public Health, Ann Arbor, MI, USA. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2018.03.331DOI Listing
September 2018
6 Reads
4.100 Impact Factor

Birth Cohort Consortium of Asia: Current and Future Perspectives.

Epidemiology 2017 10;28 Suppl 1:S19-S34

From the aCenter for Environmental and Health Sciences, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Japan; bMOE and Shanghai Key Laboratory of Children's Environmental Health, Xinhua Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, China; cDepartment of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Ewha Medical Research Center, Ewha Womans University, Seoul, South Korea; dInstitute of Occupational Medicine and Industrial Hygiene, National Taiwan University College of Public Health, Taipei, Taiwan; eDepartment of Environmental and Occupational Medicine, National Taiwan University Hospital and National Taiwan University College of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan; fDepartment of Environmental Health, School of Public Health, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, China; gState Key Lab of Reproductive Medicine, School of Public Health, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, China; hHamamatsu University School of Medicine, Research Center for Child Mental Development, Hamamatsu, Japan; iTohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendai, Japan; jGraduate School of Public Health, Seoul National University, Seoul, South Korea; kDepartment of Pediatrics, Childhood Asthma Atopy Center, Environmental Health Center, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul, South Korea; lEnvironmental Health Center, Seoul National University, Seoul, South Korea; mThe Korean Institute of Child Care and Education (KICCE), Seoul, South Korea; nDepartment of Natural Resource Science, Nutrition and Dietetics Programme, School of Health Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia, George Town, Malaysia; oDepartment of Natural Resource, McGill University, Montreal, Canada; pCarolina Population Center, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC; qDepartment of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, National University Health System, Singapore; rSingapore Institute for Clinical Sciences, Agency for Science Technology and Research (A*STAR), Singapore; sNational Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, National Health Research Institutes, Miaoli County, Taiwan; tDepartment of Epidemiology and Public Health, Kanazawa Medical University, Uchinada, Ishikawa, Japan; uInstitute of Medical, Pharmaceutical and Health Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, Kanazawa University, Kanazawa, Japan; vBiomedical and Pharmaceutical Research Center, Vietnam Military Medical University, Ha Noi, Vietnam; and wNational Institute of Health Sciences, Kalutara, Sri Lanka.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/EDE.0000000000000698DOI Listing
October 2017
38 Reads
1 Citation
6.200 Impact Factor

Urinary and plasma fluoride levels in pregnant women from Mexico City.

Environ Res 2016 10 14;150:489-495. Epub 2016 Jul 14.

Center for Nutrition and Health Research, National Institute of Public Health, Cuernavaca, Morelos, México.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.envres.2016.06.046DOI Listing
October 2016
50 Reads
1 Citation
4.373 Impact Factor

Genetic polymorphisms are associated with hair, blood, and urine mercury levels in the American Dental Association (ADA) study participants.

Environ Res 2016 08 7;149:247-258. Epub 2015 Dec 7.

Faculty of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada; Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Unisiversity of Michigan School of Public Health, Ann Arbor, MI, USA. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.envres.2015.11.032DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4897752PMC
August 2016
24 Reads
4 Citations
4.373 Impact Factor

Association of cadmium and arsenic exposure with salivary telomere length in adolescents in Terai, Nepal.

Environ Res 2016 08 4;149:8-14. Epub 2016 May 4.

Department of Human Ecology, School of International Health, Graduate School of Medicine, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1, Hongo, Bunkyo-Ku, Tokyo, 113-0033, Japan. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.envres.2016.04.037DOI Listing
August 2016
32 Reads
3 Citations
4.373 Impact Factor

Association of cord blood levels of lead, arsenic, and zinc and home environment with children neurodevelopment at 36 months living in Chitwan Valley, Nepal.

PLoS One 2015 24;10(3):e0120992. Epub 2015 Mar 24.

Department of Human Ecology, Graduate School of Medicine, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1, Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, 113-0033, Japan.

Background: Inconsistent results continue to be reported from studies linking low-level prenatal lead exposure and child development. Because of limited earlier epidemiological studies with birth cohort follow up design, it still remains inconclusive that either the associations of cord blood level of toxic, and essential elements, and postnatal raising environment on neurodevelopment of children remains constant throughout childhood or change over time.

Aims: This study aims to investigate the influence of in utero toxic [lead (Pb) and arsenic (As)] and essential elements [zinc (Zn)] levels on neurodevelopment of 36 months children in Chitwan valley, Nepal taking the postnatal environment into account.

Study Designs And Subjects: In this birth cohort study, participants (N=100 mother-infants' pairs) were recruited in Chitwan district, Nepal. We measured Pb, As and Zn concentrations in cord blood. Postnatal raising environment (i.e., Home score or home environment hereafter) was evaluated using Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME) scale. Neurodevelopment of children at 36 months of age (n=70) were assessed using Bayley Scale of Infant Development, Second Edition (BSID II). Multivariate regression was performed (n=70) to see the association of in utero toxic and essential elements level and home environment with neurodevelopment score adjusted for covariates.

Results: Cord blood levels of Pb, As and Zn were not associated with any BSID II cluster scores of 36 months children. The children with relatively superior HOME score and concurrent nutritional status (weight at 36 months) showed better cognitive development (i.e., MDI scores) and motor functions than their counterparts, respectively.

Conclusion: In this general population in Nepal, prenatal Pb, As and Zn levels are not important determinants of the neurodevelopment of 36- month-old children while a consistent beneficial effect of a stimulating home environment on neurodevelopmental indicators is continued.

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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0120992PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4372553PMC
February 2016
16 Reads
3.234 Impact Factor

Letter in response to Dr. José G. Dórea.

Neurotoxicol Teratol 2014 Sep-Oct;45:94. Epub 2014 Jun 26.

Department of Social Medicine, National Research Institute for Child Health and Development, 2-10-1, Okura, Setagaya-Ku, 157-8535 Tokyo, Japan.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ntt.2014.06.008DOI Listing
May 2015
24 Reads
2.762 Impact Factor

Home environment and cord blood levels of lead, arsenic, and zinc on neurodevelopment of 24 months children living in Chitwan Valley, Nepal.

J Trace Elem Med Biol 2015 Jan 24;29:315-20. Epub 2014 Aug 24.

Department of Human Ecology, Graduate School of Medicine, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1, Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033, Japan.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jtemb.2014.08.006DOI Listing
January 2015
29 Reads
1 Citation
2.491 Impact Factor

Home environment and prenatal exposure to lead, arsenic and zinc on the neurodevelopment of six-month-old infants living in Chitwan Valley, Nepal.

Neurotoxicol Teratol 2014 Jan-Feb;41:89-95. Epub 2014 Jan 11.

Department of Human Ecology, Graduate School of Medicine, University of Tokyo, Japan.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ntt.2013.12.006DOI Listing
October 2014
41 Reads
1 Citation
2.762 Impact Factor

Significant sex difference in the association between C-reactive protein concentration and anthropometry among 13- to 19-year olds, but not 6- to 12-year olds in Nepal.

Am J Phys Anthropol 2014 May 16;154(1):42-51. Epub 2014 Jan 16.

Department of Human Ecology, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, 113-0033, Japan; Department of Anthropology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, 98195.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ajpa.22470DOI Listing
May 2014
26 Reads
4 Citations
2.380 Impact Factor

Impact of caste on the neurodevelopment of young children from birth to 36 months of age: a birth cohort study in Chitwan Valley, Nepal.

BMC Pediatr 2014 Feb 27;14:56. Epub 2014 Feb 27.

Department of Social Medicine, National Research Institute for Child Health and Development, 2-10-1 Okura, Setagaya-ku, 157-8535 Tokyo, Japan.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1471-2431-14-56DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3941607PMC
February 2014
36 Reads
3 Citations
1.920 Impact Factor

Association of cord blood levels of lead, arsenic, and zinc with neurodevelopmental indicators in newborns: a birth cohort study in Chitwan Valley, Nepal.

Environ Res 2013 Feb 16;121:45-51. Epub 2012 Nov 16.

Department of Social Medicine, National Research Institute for Child Health and Development, 2-10-1, Okura, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo 157-8535, Japan.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.envres.2012.10.010DOI Listing
February 2013
25 Reads
17 Citations
4.373 Impact Factor

Diet among people in the Terai region of Nepal, an area of micronutrient deficiency.

J Biosoc Sci 2012 Jul 19;44(4):401-15. Epub 2012 Mar 19.

Department of Human Ecology, Graduate School of Medicine, University of Tokyo, Japan.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0021932012000065DOI Listing
July 2012
29 Reads
5 Citations

Cord blood levels of toxic and essential trace elements and their determinants in the Terai region of Nepal: a birth cohort study.

Biol Trace Elem Res 2012 Jun 11;147(1-3):75-83. Epub 2012 Jan 11.

Department of Social Medicine, National Research Institute for Child Health and Development, Tokyo, Japan.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12011-011-9309-1DOI Listing
June 2012
13 Reads
3 Citations
1.750 Impact Factor

Behavioral and nutritional factors and geohelminth infection among two ethnic groups in the Terai region, Nepal.

Am J Hum Biol 2009 Jan-Feb;21(1):98-104

Department of Human Ecology, Graduate School of Medicine, University of Tokyo, Bunkyo, Tokyo, 113-0033 Japan.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ajhb.20825DOI Listing
March 2009
11 Reads
3 Citations
1.700 Impact Factor