Publications by authors named "Rajeev Shrivastava"

6 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Key Aggregation Cryptosystem and Double Encryption Method for Cloud-Based Intelligent Machine Learning Techniques-Based Health Monitoring Systems.

Comput Intell Neurosci 2022 21;2022:3767912. Epub 2022 Apr 21.

Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Kumasi, Ghana.

Cloud technology is a business strategy that aims to provide the necessary material to customers depending on their needs. Individuals and cloud businesses alike have embraced the cloud storage service, which has become the most widely used service. The industries outsource their data to cloud storage space to relieve themselves of the load of dealing with redundant data contents. This must be protected to prevent the theft of personal belongings, and privacy must be improved as well. Different research projects have been suggested to ensure the safe management of the information included within the data content. The security of current research projects, on the contrary, still needs improvement. As a result, this method has been suggested to address the security concerns associated with cloud computing. The primary goal of this study effort is to offer a safe environment for cloud users while also increasing the profit of cloud resource providers by managing and securely delivering data contents to the cloud users. The bulk of sectors, including business, finance, military, and healthcare industry, do not store data in cloud-based storage systems. This technique is used to attract these kinds of customers. Increasing public acceptance, medical researchers are drawn to cloud computing because it allows them to store their study material in a centralized location and distribute and access it in a more flexible manner. They were collected from numerous individuals who were being evaluated for medical care at the time. Scalable and enhanced key aggregate cryptosystem is a protected data protection method that provides highly effective security in the healthcare industry. When parties interested in a dispute disagree on the outflow of sensitive information, this technique manages the disputes and ensures the data security deployment of a cloud-based intelligent health monitoring system for the parties involved. The encrypted data structure of medical and healthcare prescriptions is recorded as they move through the hands of patients and healthcare facilities, according to the technique recommended. The double encryption approach is used in order to raise the overall degree of security. An encryption class is created by referring to the Ciphertext ID during the encryption procedure. The keyholder is a master secret key that facilitates in the recovery of the secret keys of various monsters and creatures by acting as a conduit between them. It is transferred and stored as a single aggregate for the benefit of the patient or customer in order to make decryption more convenient and efficient. A safe connection between cloud-based intelligent health monitoring systems and healthcare organizations and their patients may be established via the use of a key aggregation cryptosystem and a double encryption approach, according to the researchers. Because of this, when compared to earlier techniques, the findings reveal that the research methodology provides high levels of security in terms of confidentiality and integrity, in addition to excellent scalability.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2022/3767912DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC9050288PMC
May 2022

Phalange metastasis from carcinoma of alveolus.

Indian J Dent Res 2009 Oct-Dec;20(4):496-8

Department of Radiotherapy & Oncology, Rural Medical College, Loni, Ahmednagar, Maharastra, India.

Metastatic involvement of a phalanx by head and neck cancers is rare. We report a case of a 66-year-old man with squamous cell carcinoma of the alveolus who had no residual disease or local recurrence after treatment but presented with metastasis to the middle phalanx of the middle finger.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/0970-9290.59452DOI Listing
May 2010

Rectal dosimetry in intracavitary brachytherapy by HDR at rural center of Maharashtra: Comparison of two methods.

J Med Phys 2009 Apr;34(2):93-6

Department of Radiotherapy and Oncology, Rural Medical College, Loni, Ahmednagar, Maharashtra, India.

The purpose of this study was to calculate the radiation dose at the anterior rectal wall as per the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU 38) recommendations and compare it with the dose calculated by the commonly used intrarectal catheter. Dose delivery by brachytherapy to the cervix is limited by the critical structure of the bladder and rectum. In this study the ICRU-38 rectal point was derived by using a radio-opaque gauze piece on the posterior vaginal wall, and the intrarectal point was derived by inserting a rubber catheter with a wire, inside the rectum. A total of 146 applications were performed in 81 patients. Rectal doses were compared for complementary rectal points R1 and R5, R2 and R6, R3 and R7, and R4 and R8, obtained by both methods. The rectal doses at each complementary pair were compared with each other. The average dose at R1 was 5% higher than at R5 (60.57% vs. 55.57%). The average dose at R2 was 1% higher than at R6 (58% vs. 57%). The average dose at R3 was 1.29% higher than at R7 (52.71% vs. 51.42%), and the average dose at R4 was 1.15% higher than at R8 (43% vs. 41.85%). There were many instances where the rectal dose exceeded by more than 15%, from the R1 to R4 points (43, 22, 21, and 11 times, respectively, for R1-R5, R2-R6, R3-R7, and R4-R8 pairs). The difference in dose between R1 and R5 was significant as seen on the statistical tests, i.e., Pair T test, Wilcoxan Signed Ranks test, and Sign test (p value 0.002). The rectal dose obtained by the intrarectal wire method underestimates the actual dose to the rectum when compared to the ICRU-38 method. Thus ICRU-38 recommendations should be strictly adhered to, to reduce late complications.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/0971-6203.51936DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2805896PMC
April 2009

Synthesis of chiral cyclohexanes and carbasugars by 6-exo-dig radical cyclisation reactions.

Beilstein J Org Chem 2008 19;4:43. Epub 2008 Nov 19.

Department of Chemistry, University of Sunderland, Sunderland, SR1 3SD, UK.

Treatment of 5-(tert-butyldimethylsilyl)-2,3-O-isopropylidene-D-ribose with lithium acetylides gave mixtures of syn- and anti-alkynols 2a-2c which were separated following protection as methoxymethyl ethers. These were converted to the corresponding iodides which underwent 6-exo-dig radical cyclisation to afford chiral cyclohexanes and carbasugars. Oxidation of the primary alcohols 6a-b gave the corresponding aldehydes which on treatment with Grignard reagents afforded a mixture of alcohols. The corresponding iodides underwent similar 6-exo-dig cyclisation to give fully functionalised cyclohexanes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3762/bjoc.4.43DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2605619PMC
May 2010

Radical radiotherapy treatment (EBRT + HDR-ICRT) of carcinoma of the uterine cervix: outcome in patients treated at a rural center in India.

J Cancer Res Ther 2007 Oct-Dec;3(4):211-7

Department of Radiotherapy and Clinical Oncology, Pravara Rural University (Deemed University), Dist. Ahemednagar, India.

Aim: To report the outcome of carcinoma of the uterine cervix patients treated radically by external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and high-dose-rate (HDR) intracavitary radiotherapy (ICRT).

Materials And Methods: Between January 1997 to December 2001, a total of 550 newly diagnosed cases of carcinoma of the uterine cervix were reported in the department. All cases were staged according to the International Federation of Gynecologists and Oncologists (FIGO) staging system, but for analytical convenience, the staging was limited to stages I, II, III, and IV. Out of the 550 cases, 214 completed radical radiotherapy (EBRT + HDR-ICRT) and were retrospectively analyzed for presence of local residual disease, local recurrence, distant metastases, radiation reactions, and disease-free survival.

Results: There were 7 (3.27%), 88 (41.1%), 101 (47.1%), and 18 (8.4%) patients in stage I, II, III, and IV, respectively. The median follow-up time for all patients was 43 months (range: 3-93 months) and for patients who were disease free till the last follow-up it was 59 months (range: 24-93 months). The overall treatment time (OTT) ranged from 52 to 73 days (median 61 days). The 5-year disease-free mean survival rate was 58%, 44%, 33%, and 15%, with 95% confidence interval of 48 to 68, 37 to 51, 24 to 35, and 6 to 24 for stages I, II, III, and IV, respectively. There were 62 (28.97%) cases with local residual disease, 35 (16.3%) developed local recurrence/distant metastases, 17 (7.9%) developed distant metastases, and 9 (4.2%) had local recurrence as well.

Discussion And Conclusion: The overall outcome was poor in advanced stage disease, but might be improved by increasing the total dose, decreasing overall duration of treatment, and by adding chemotherapy in patients with disease limited to the pelvis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/0973-1482.38996DOI Listing
March 2008

High-dose-rate-intracavitary brachytherapy applications and the difference in the bladder and rectum doses: a study from rural centre of Maharashatra, India.

J Cancer Res Ther 2007 Apr-Jun;3(2):116-20

Department of Radiotherapy and Clinical Oncology, Pravara Rural University (Deemed University), Loni, BK-413 736, Ahmednagar, India.

Aim: To report the difference in the bladder and rectum doses with different applications by the radiotherapists in the same patient of the carcinoma of the uterine cervix treated by multiple fractions of high-dose-rate (HDR) intracavitary brachytherapy (ICBT).

Materials And Methods: Between January 2003 to December 2004, a total of 60 cases of the carcinoma uterine cervix were selected randomly for the retrospective analyses. All 60 cases were grouped in six groups according to the treating radiotherapist who did the HDR-ICBT application. Three radiotherapists were considered for this study, named A, B and C. Ten cases for each radiotherapist in whom all three applications were done by the same radiotherapist. And 10 cases for each radiotherapist with shared applications in the same patient (A+B, A+C and B+C). The bladder and rectal doses were calculated in reference to point "A" dose and were limited to 80% of prescribed point "A" dose, as per ICRU-38 recommendations. Received dose grouped in three groups--less then 80% (< 80%), 80-100% and above 100% (>100%). A total of 180 applications for 60 patients were calculated for the above analyses.

Results: There is a lot of difference in the bladder and rectal doses with the application by the different radiotherapists, even in the same patient with multiple fractions of HDR-ICBT. Applications by 'A' radiotherapist were within the limits in the self as well as in the shared groups more number of times, by 'B' radiotherapist was more times exceeding the limit and by 'C' radiotherapist doses were in between the A and B.

Discussion And Conclusion: For the rectal and bladder doses most important factors are patient's age, disease stage, duration between EBRT and HDR-ICRT and patient anatomy, but these differences can be minimized to some extent by careful application, proper packing and proper fixation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/0973-1482.34693DOI Listing
January 2008
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