Publications by authors named "Rahmath Abdulla"

3 Publications

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A Review: Underutilized plant of Sabah and Its Potential Value.

Curr Pharm Biotechnol 2021 Feb 8. Epub 2021 Feb 8.

Faculty of Science and Natural Resources, University Malaysia Sabah, Jalan UMS, 88400, Kota Kinabalu, Sabah, . Malaysia.

Underutilized plants are referred to a plant species which their potential is not fully utilized yet and they are usually found abundantly in certain local area but globally rare. Sabah is known for a high biodiversity and contains many underutilized plants. To our knowledge, this is the first review is to provide an overview information of medicinal value and pharmacological properties of underutilized plant in Sabah. Extract and metabolites in different part of several underutilized plant contains multiple beneficial bioactive compounds and exploitation of these compounds was supported by additional data which plays various biological activities including anti-atherosclerotic, anti-cancer, antihypercholesterolemic and anti-ulcerogenic. A handful of pharmacological studies on the natural product these underutilized plants have conclusively outlined the mode of action in treatment of several diseases and in other health aspects. This paper limits its scope to reviewe and highlight the potential of using underutilized plants in Sabah only which could serve as reliable resource for health product development in pharmaceutical and nutraceutical through continuous discovering of more active and sustainable resources as well as ingredients for food and medicine.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2174/1389201022666210208201212DOI Listing
February 2021

Yeasts in sustainable bioethanol production: A review.

Biochem Biophys Rep 2017 Jul 6;10:52-61. Epub 2017 Mar 6.

Biotechnology Research Institute, Universiti Malaysia Sabah, Jalan UMS, 88400 Kota Kinabalu, Sabah, Malaysia.

Bioethanol has been identified as the mostly used biofuel worldwide since it significantly contributes to the reduction of crude oil consumption and environmental pollution. It can be produced from various types of feedstocks such as sucrose, starch, lignocellulosic and algal biomass through fermentation process by microorganisms. Compared to other types of microoganisms, yeasts especially is the common microbes employed in ethanol production due to its high ethanol productivity, high ethanol tolerance and ability of fermenting wide range of sugars. However, there are some challenges in yeast fermentation which inhibit ethanol production such as high temperature, high ethanol concentration and the ability to ferment pentose sugars. Various types of yeast strains have been used in fermentation for ethanol production including hybrid, recombinant and wild-type yeasts. Yeasts can directly ferment simple sugars into ethanol while other type of feedstocks must be converted to fermentable sugars before it can be fermented to ethanol. The common processes involves in ethanol production are pretreatment, hydrolysis and fermentation. Production of bioethanol during fermentation depends on several factors such as temperature, sugar concentration, pH, fermentation time, agitation rate, and inoculum size. The efficiency and productivity of ethanol can be enhanced by immobilizing the yeast cells. This review highlights the different types of yeast strains, fermentation process, factors affecting bioethanol production and immobilization of yeasts for better bioethanol production.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bbrep.2017.03.003DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5637245PMC
July 2017

Biodiesel production from Jatropha curcas: a critical review.

Crit Rev Biotechnol 2011 Mar 24;31(1):53-64. Epub 2010 Jun 24.

Centre of Materials and Minerals, School of Engineering and Information Technology, Universiti Malaysia Sabah, Kota Kinabalu, Sabah, Malaysia.

The fuel crisis and environmental concerns, mainly due to global warming, have led researchers to consider the importance of biofuels such as biodiesel. Vegetable oils, which are too viscous to be used directly in engines, are converted into their corresponding methyl or ethyl esters by a process called transesterification. With the recent debates on "food versus fuel," non-edible oils, such as Jatropha curcas, are emerging as one of the main contenders for biodiesel production. Much research is still needed to explore and realize the full potential of a green fuel from J. curcas. Upcoming projects and plantations of Jatropha in countries such as India, Malaysia, and Indonesia suggest a promising future for this plant as a potential biodiesel feedstock. Many of the drawbacks associated with chemical catalysts can be overcome by using lipases for enzymatic transesterification. The high cost of lipases can be overcome, to a certain extent, by immobilization techniques. This article reviews the importance of the J. curcas plant and describes existing research conducted on Jatropha biodiesel production. The article highlights areas where further research is required and relevance of designing an immobilized lipase for biodiesel production is discussed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/07388551.2010.487185DOI Listing
March 2011
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