Publications by authors named "Ragnhild Bergene Skråstad"

7 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Stability of Phosphatidylethanol 16:0/18:1 in Freshly Drawn, Authentic Samples from Healthy Volunteers.

J Anal Toxicol 2021 Apr;45(4):417-421

Department of Clinical Pharmacology, St. Olavs Hospital, 7006 Trondheim, Norway.

Due to its specificity, phosphatidylethanol (PEth) 16:0/18:1 has gained increased popularity as a marker for high alcohol consumption in recent years. As conflicting results regarding the stability of PEth 16:0/18:1 in whole blood have been published, there are still uncertainties related to optimum handling, transport and storage of blood samples for the analysis of PEth 16:0/18:1. A stability study where whole blood samples were drawn from healthy volunteers, who had ingested alcohol, is presented. The samples were collected in tubes with ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA) and heparin as additives and stored under standardized conditions within 1 h of blood sampling. Storage times were 28 days in ambient temperature and at 4-8°C, and 90 days at -20°C and -80°C. All samples were analyzed regularly during the storage periods. PEth 16:0/18:1 concentrations were stable (defined as < 15% decrease compared with baseline values) at all temperatures up to 28 days, independent of additive. After 90 days of storage at -20°C, the mean concentrations had decreased by 18.8% in EDTA tubes and by 13.8% in heparin tubes. At -80°C, the concentrations were stable throughout the 90-day period. The present study shows that in samples containing PEth formed in vivo, PEth 16:0/18:1 is stable for 28 days irrespective of storage temperature. During long-term storage, samples should be stored at -80°C.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/jat/bkaa082DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8040374PMC
April 2021

Bruk av fosfatidyletanol i førerkortsaker.

Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen 2019 02 11;139(3). Epub 2019 Feb 11.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.4045/tidsskr.18.0973DOI Listing
February 2019

High Throughput UPLC®-MSMS Method for the Analysis of Phosphatidylethanol (PEth) 16:0/18:1, a Specific Biomarker for Alcohol Consumption, in Whole Blood.

J Anal Toxicol 2018 Jan;42(1):33-41

Department of Clinical Pharmacology, St. Olav University Hospital, 7006 Trondheim, Norway.

Phosphatidylethanol (PEth) is an alcohol biomarker formed in the presence of ethanol in the body. Both due to its specificity and because it has a detection window of up to several weeks after alcohol intake, its application potential is broader than for other ethanol biomarkers. The aim of this study was to develop and validate a robust method for PEth in whole blood with fast and efficient sample extraction and a short analytical runtime, suitable for high throughput routine purposes. A validated ultra-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC®-MSMS) method for quantification of PEth 16:0/18:1 in the range 0.05-4.00 μM (R2 ≥ 0.999) is presented. PEth 16:0/18:1 and the internal standard (IS) PEth-d5 (0.55 μM), were extracted from whole blood (150 μL) by simple protein precipitation with 2-propanol (450 μL). Chromatography was achieved using a BEH-phenyl (2.1 × 30 mm, 1.7 μm) column and a gradient elution combining ammonium formate (5 mM, pH 10.1) and acetonitrile at a flow rate of 0.5 mL/min. Runtime was 2.3 min. The mass spectrometer was monitored in negative mode with multiple reaction monitoring (MRM). The m/z 701.7 > 255.2 and 701.7 > 281.3 transitions were monitored for PEth 16:0/18:1 and the m/z 706.7 > 255.3 for PEth-d5. Limit of quantification was 0.03 μM (coefficient of variation, CV = 6.7%, accuracy = 99.3%). Within-assay and between-assay imprecision were 0.4-3.3% (CV ≤ 7.1%). Recoveries were 95-102% (CV ≤ 4.9%). Matrix effects after IS correction ranged from 107% to 112%. PEth 16:0/18:1 in patient samples were stable for several days at 30°C. Repeated freezing (-80°C) and thawing did not affect the concentration. After thawing and analysis patient samples were stable at 4-8°C for at least 4 weeks. Results from a proficiency test program, showing |Z| values ≤1.2, confirm the validity of the method. Analysis of the first 3,169 samples sent to our laboratory for routine use has demonstrated its properties as a robust method suitable for high throughput purposes.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/jat/bkx075DOI Listing
January 2018

[New biomarkers for assesing alcohol consumption].

Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen 2016 Oct 25;136(19):1643-1647. Epub 2016 Oct 25.

Avdeling for klinisk farmakologi St. Olavs hospital og Institutt for laboratoriemedisin, barne- og kvinnesykdommer Norges teknisk-naturvitenskapelige universitet.

Alcohol abuse has significant medical, social and socioeconomic consequences. Alcohol biomarkers may serve as a useful tool in identifying individuals with excessive alcohol consumption in medical as well as medico-legal contexts.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.4045/tidsskr.16.0056DOI Listing
October 2016

Metabolomic biomarkers in serum and urine in women with preeclampsia.

PLoS One 2014 17;9(3):e91923. Epub 2014 Mar 17.

Department of Circulation and Medical Imaging, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Trondheim, Norway; St. Olavs Hospital, Trondheim University Hospital, Trondheim, Norway.

Objective: To explore the potential of magnetic resonance (MR) metabolomics for study of preeclampsia, for improved phenotyping and elucidating potential clues to etiology and pathogenesis.

Methods: Urine and serum samples from pregnant women with preeclampsia (n = 10), normal pregnancies (n = 10) and non-pregnant women (n = 10) matched by age and gestational age were analyzed with MR spectroscopy and subjected to multivariate analysis. Metabolites were then quantified and compared between groups.

Results: Urine and serum samples revealed clear differences between women with preeclampsia and both control groups (normal pregnant and non-pregnant women). Nine urine metabolites were significantly different between preeclampsia and the normal pregnant group. Urine samples from women with early onset preeclampsia clustered together in the multivariate analysis. The preeclampsia serum spectra showed higher levels of low and very-low density lipoproteins and lower levels of high-density lipoproteins when compared to both non-pregnant and normal pregnant women.

Conclusion: The MR determined metabolic profiles in urine and serum from women with preeclampsia are clearly different from normal pregnant women. The observed differences represent a potential to examine mechanisms underlying different preeclampsia phenotypes in urine and serum samples in larger studies. In addition, similarities between preeclampsia and cardiovascular disease in metabolomics are demonstrated.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0091923PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3956817PMC
January 2015

PP002. Metabolomic biomarkers in serum and urine of preeclamptic women.

Pregnancy Hypertens 2013 Apr 6;3(2):67-8. Epub 2013 Jun 6.

Introduction: Preeclampsia (PE) affects about 3% of pregnancies. The syndrome cannot be accurately predicted, and large variation complicates the search for early biomarkers. Metabolites are components of the metabolism; the chemical interactions in the body necessary for life. Metabolomics, the study of metabolism, has been used to characterize diabetes, cancer and cardiovascular disease (CVD).

Objectives: Explore the use of magnetic resonance (MR) metabolomics on PE, and to elucidate potential clues to PE etiology and pathogenesis.

Methods: Serum and urine from non-pregnant women (n=10) and pregnant women with PE (n=10) or normal pregnancies (n=10), was analyzed with MR spectroscopy and subjected to multivariate analysis (MVA). Metabolites were quantified and compared between groups.

Results: Urine and serum samples revealed differences between PE and both control groups. Ten urine metabolites were significantly different between the three groups. Urine samples from women with early-onset PE clustered together in MVA. PE serum spectra had higher levels of low and very-low density lipoproteins, and lower high-density lipoproteins compared to control groups.

Conclusion: PE and control samples were effectively discriminated using MR metabolomics, suggesting that MR metabolomics is a useful method for improved sub-phenotyping of PE in larger studies. Information relevant to the disease was found both for serum and urine samples, and indicated similarities between PE and CVD.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.preghy.2013.04.030DOI Listing
April 2013