Publications by authors named "Radim Krupicka"

8 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

The timed up & go test sit-to-stand transition: Which signals measured by inertial sensors are a viable route for continuous analysis?

Gait Posture 2021 02 12;84:8-10. Epub 2020 Nov 12.

Department of Neurology and Centre of Clinical Neuroscience, First Faculty of Medicine, Charles University and General University Hospital in Prague, Prague, Czech Republic. Electronic address:

Background: The Timed Up and Go test is a well-known clinical test for assessing of mobility and fall risk. It has been shown that the IMU which use an accelerometer and gyroscope are capable of analysing the quantitative parameters of the sit-to-stand transition.

Research Question: Which signals obtained by the inertial sensors are suitable for continuous Timed Up & Go test sit-to-stand transition analysis?

Methods: In the study we included 29 older adult volunteers and 31 de-novo Parkinson disease (PD) patients. All subjects performed an instrumented extended TUG wearing a gyro-accelerometer. The sit-to-stand transition was detected from an angular velocity signal. The sit-to-stand signal pattern within the subject group was analyzed via an intra-class correlation between curves. Inter-subjects' variability was visualized using prediction bands.

Results: The angular velocity about the pitch axis exhibited the best signal match across subjects in both groups (0.50 < ICC < 0.75). When analysing acceleration, the acceleration along the antero-posterior axis showed moderate inter-subjects signal pattern match (0.50 < ICC < 0.75) in the reference group. The analysis of other signals revealed a poor signal pattern in both subject groups.

Significance: For optimal interpretation of the analysis of continuous curves, the signal pattern must be considered. Also, the inter-subject variability along this pattern can be informative and useful.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.gaitpost.2020.11.006DOI Listing
February 2021

Instrumental analysis of finger tapping reveals a novel early biomarker of parkinsonism in idiopathic rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder.

Sleep Med 2020 11 18;75:45-49. Epub 2020 Jul 18.

Department of Neurology and Center of Clinical Neuroscience, First Faculty of Medicine, Charles University and General University Hospital, Czech Republic.

Background: Idiopathic rapid eye movement sleep behaviour (iRBD) is considered as a risk factor for Parkinson's disease (PD) development. Evaluation of repetitive movements with finger tapping, which serves as a principal task to measure the extent of bradykinesia in PD, may undercover potential PD patients. The aim of this study was to explore whether finger tapping abnormalities, evaluated with a 3D motion capture system, are already present in RBD patients.

Methods: Finger tapping data was acquired using a contactless 3D motion capture system from 40 RBD subjects and compared to 25 de-novo PD patients and 25 healthy controls. Objective assessment of amplitude decrement, maximum opening velocity and their combination representing finger tapping decrement was performed in the sequence of the first ten tapping movements. The association between instrumental finger tapping data and semi-quantitative clinical evaluation was analyzed.

Results: While significant differences between PD and controls were found for all investigated finger tapping measures (p < 0.002), RBD differed from controls in finger tapping amplitude (p = 0.004) and velocity (p = 0.007) decrement but not in maximal opening velocity. A significant relationship between the motor score from the Movement Disorders Society - Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale and finger tapping decrement was shown for both patient groups, ie RBD (r = 0.36, p = 0.02) and PD (r = 0.60, p = 0.002).

Conclusions: In our group of RBD patients we demonstrated amplitude decrement of repetitive movements, which may correspond with prodromal bradykinesia. Our findings suggest instrumental analysis of finger tapping abnormalities as a potential novel clinical marker reflecting subclinical motor disturbances in RBD.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.sleep.2020.07.019DOI Listing
November 2020

Agreement between the GAITRite System and the Wearable Sensor BTS G-Walk for measurement of gait parameters in healthy adults and Parkinson's disease patients.

PeerJ 2020 22;8:e8835. Epub 2020 May 22.

Department of Neurology and Center of Clinical Neuroscience, 1st Faculty of Medicine and General University Hospital in Prague, Charles University, Prague, Czech Republic.

Background: Nowadays, the most widely used types of wearable sensors in gait analysis are inertial sensors. The aim of the study was to assess the agreement between two different systems for measuring gait parameters (inertial sensor vs. electronic walkway) on healthy control subjects (HC) and patients with Parkinson's disease (PD).

Methods: Forty healthy volunteers (26 men, 14 women, mean age 58.7 ± 7.7 years) participated in the study and 24 PD patients (19 men, five women, mean age 62.7 ± 9.8 years). Each participant walked across an electronic walkway, GAITRite, with embedded pressure sensors at their preferred walking speed. Concurrently a G-Walk sensor was attached with a semi-elastic belt to the L5 spinal segment of the subject. Walking speed, cadence, stride duration, stride length, stance, swing, single support and double support phase values were compared between both systems.

Results: The Passing-Bablock regression slope line manifested the values closest to 1.00 for cadence and stride duration (0.99 ≤ 1.00) in both groups. The slope of other parameters varied between 0.26 (double support duration in PD) and 1.74 (duration of single support for HC). The mean square error confirmed the best fit of the regression line for speed, stride duration and stride length. The y-intercepts showed higher systematic error in PD than HC for speed, stance, swing, and single support phases.

Conclusions: The final results of this study indicate that the G-Walk system can be used for evaluating the gait characteristics of the healthy subjects as well as the PD patients. However, the duration of the gait cycle phases should be used with caution due to the presence of a systematic error.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.7717/peerj.8835DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7247524PMC
May 2020

Instrumental analysis of gait abnormalities in idiopathic rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder.

Mov Disord 2020 01;35(1):193-195

Department of Neurology and Centre of Clinical Neuroscience, First Faculty of Medicine, Charles University and General University Hospital in Prague, Czech Republic.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/mds.27938DOI Listing
January 2020

Relations of non-motor symptoms and dopamine transporter binding in REM sleep behavior disorder.

Sci Rep 2019 10 29;9(1):15463. Epub 2019 Oct 29.

Department of Neurology and Center of Clinical Neuroscience, First Faculty of Medicine, Charles University and General University Hospital in Prague, Prague, Czech Republic.

The aim of this study was to evaluate associations of motor and non-motor symptoms with dopamine transporter binding in prodromal stage of synucleinopathies. We examined 74 patients with idiopathic REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD), which is a prodromal synucleinopathy, and 39 controls using Movement Disorders Society-Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (MDS-UPDRS), Montreal Cognitive Assessment, University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification Test (UPSIT), Farnsworth-Munsell 100 hue test, orthostatic test, Scales for Outcomes in PD-Autonomic, Beck depression inventory-II, State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, and video-polysomnography. Electromyographic muscle activity during REM sleep was quantified according to Sleep Innsbruck-Barcelona criteria. In 65 patients, dopamine transporter single-photon emission computed tomography (DAT-SPECT) imaging was performed, putaminal binding ratio was calculated and scans were classified as normal, borderline, or abnormal. Compared to controls, RBD patients had significantly more severe scores in all examined tests. Patients with abnormal DAT-SPECT had higher MDS-UPDRS motor score (p = 0.006) and higher prevalence of orthostatic hypotension (p = 0.008). Putaminal binding ratio was positively associated with UPSIT score (p = 0.03) and negatively associated with tonic (p = 0.003) and phasic (p = 0.01) muscle activity during REM sleep. These associations likely reflect simultaneous advancement of underlying pathology in substantia nigra and susceptible brainstem and olfactory nuclei in prodromal synucleinopathy.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-019-51710-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6820530PMC
October 2019

Extended Timed Up & Go test: Is walking forward and returning back to the chair equivalent gait?

J Biomech 2019 May 10;89:110-114. Epub 2019 Apr 10.

Department of Neurology and Centre of Clinical Neuroscience, First Faculty of Medicine, Charles University and General University Hospital in Prague, Prague, Czech Republic. Electronic address:

The Timed Up & Go test (TUG) is functional test and is a part of routine clinical examinations. The instrumented Timed Up & Go test enables its segmentation to sub-tasks: sit-to-stand, walking forward, turning, walking back, stand-to-sit, and consequently the computation of task-specific parameters and sub-tasks separately. However, there are no data on whether walking forward parameters differ from the walking back parameters. This study tested the differences between walking forward and walking back in the TUG extended to 10 m for 17 spatio-temporal gait parameters. All parameters were obtained from a GAITRite® pressure sensitive walkway (CIR Systems, Inc.). The differences were assessed for healthy controls and Parkinson's disease (PD) patients. None of investigated parameters exhibited a difference between both gait subtasks for healthy subjects group. Five parameters of interest, namely velocity, step length, stride length, stride velocity, and the proportion of the double support phase with respect to gait cycle duration, showed a statistically significant difference between gait for walking forward and walking back in PD patients. Therefore, we recommend a separate assessment for walking forward and walking back rather than averaging both gaits together.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jbiomech.2019.04.001DOI Listing
May 2019

Comparative analysis of speech impairment and upper limb motor dysfunction in Parkinson's disease.

J Neural Transm (Vienna) 2017 04 8;124(4):463-470. Epub 2016 Dec 8.

Department of Neurology and Centre of Clinical Neuroscience, First Faculty of Medicine, Charles University, Prague, Czech Republic.

It is currently unknown whether speech and limb motor effectors in Parkinson's disease (PD) are controlled by similar underlying brain processes. Based on computerized objective analysis, the aim of this study was to evaluate potential correlation between speech and mechanical tests of upper limb motor function. Speech and upper limb motor tests were performed in 22 PD patients and 22 healthy controls. Quantitative acoustic analyses of eight key speech dimensions of hypokinetic dysarthria, including quality of voice, sequential motion rates, consonant articulation, vowel articulation, average loudness, loudness variability, pitch variability, and number of pauses, were performed. Upper limb movements were assessed using the motor part of the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale, contactless three-dimensional motion capture system, blinded expert evaluation, and the Purdue Pegboard Test. Significant relationships were observed between the quality of voice assessed by jitter and amplitude decrement of finger tapping (r = 0.61, p = 0.003), consonant articulation evaluated using voice onset time and expert rating of finger tapping (r = 0.60, p = 0.003), and number of pauses and Purdue Pegboard Test score (r = 0.60, p = 0.004). The current study supports the hypothesis that speech impairment in PD shares, at least partially, similar pathophysiological processes with limb motor dysfunction. Vocal fold vibration irregularities appeared to be influenced by mechanisms similar to amplitude decrement during repetitive limb movements. Consonant articulation deficits were associated with decreased manual dexterity and movement speed, likely reflecting fine motor control involvement in PD.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00702-016-1662-yDOI Listing
April 2017

Tests of manual dexterity and speed in Parkinson's disease: Not all measure the same.

Parkinsonism Relat Disord 2016 07 7;28:118-23. Epub 2016 May 7.

Dept. of Biomedical Informatics, Czech Technical University in Prague, Faculty of Biomedical Engineering, Sítná sq. 3105, CZ-272 01, Kladno, Czech Republic. Electronic address:

Introduction: Timed performance tests were introduced to overcome the disadvantages of subjective evaluation of bradykinesia in Parkinson's disease (PD). We aimed to verify their discriminative properties and compare them with the motion capture analysis of finger tapping.

Methods: We included 22 PD patients (10 M, 12 F), mean age 64 (range 48-82) yrs, Hoehn & Yahr stage 2 (1-2.5) and 22 (10 M, 12 F) normal controls, mean age 66 (41-82) yrs. The key tapping subtest of the Halstead-Reitan battery, the Purdue Pegboard test, and the Bradykinesia-Akinesia Incoordination (BRAIN) test were performed according to the test manuals. The finger tapping subtest of the UPDRS-III, item 23 was recorded using a contactless 3D motion capture system Optitrack-V120. Average frequency (AvgFrq), maximum opening velocity (MaxOpV) and amplitude decrement (AmpDec) were computed and simultaneous video recordings of finger tapping were rated by two experts.

Results: The AmpDec and MaxOpV motion capture measures best differentiated between PD patients and controls (AUC = 0.87 and 0.81). Of the instrumental tests, only the Purdue Pegboard attained significance in differentiating PD patients from controls (AUC = 0.80). In PD patients, MaxOpV correlated with the finger tapping ratings and BRAIN test, and AvgFrq correlated with the BRAIN and Halstead-Reitan test scores. Moreover, correlations were found between the Purdue Pegboard and finger tapping ratings.

Conclusions: Contactless 3D motion capture of finger tapping allowed an independent analysis of individual components of bradykinesia, demonstrating the amplitude decrement and maximum opening velocity as the most powerful discriminators between PD patients and controls.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.parkreldis.2016.05.009DOI Listing
July 2016
-->