Publications by authors named "Rachana Haliyur"

14 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Integrated Analysis of the Pancreas and Islets Reveals Unexpected Findings in Human Male With Type 1 Diabetes.

J Endocr Soc 2021 Dec 29;5(12):bvab162. Epub 2021 Oct 29.

Department of Molecular Physiology and Biophysics, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, USA.

Clinical and pathologic heterogeneity in type 1 diabetes is increasingly being recognized. Findings in the islets and pancreas of a 22-year-old male with 8 years of type 1 diabetes were discordant with expected results and clinical history (islet autoantibodies negative, hemoglobin A1c 11.9%) and led to comprehensive investigation to define the functional, molecular, genetic, and architectural features of the islets and pancreas to understand the cause of the donor's diabetes. Examination of the donor's pancreatic tissue found substantial but reduced β-cell mass with some islets devoid of β cells (29.3% of 311 islets) while other islets had many β cells. Surprisingly, isolated islets from the donor pancreas had substantial insulin secretion, which is uncommon for type 1 diabetes of this duration. Targeted and whole-genome sequencing and analysis did not uncover monogenic causes of diabetes but did identify high-risk human leukocyte antigen haplotypes and a genetic risk score suggestive of type 1 diabetes. Further review of pancreatic tissue found islet inflammation and some previously described α-cell molecular features seen in type 1 diabetes. By integrating analysis of isolated islets, histological evaluation of the pancreas, and genetic information, we concluded that the donor's clinical insulin deficiency was most likely the result autoimmune-mediated β-cell loss but that the constellation of findings was not typical for type 1 diabetes. This report highlights the pathologic and functional heterogeneity that can be present in type 1 diabetes.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1210/jendso/bvab162DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8633619PMC
December 2021

Combinatorial transcription factor profiles predict mature and functional human islet α and β cells.

JCI Insight 2021 09 22;6(18). Epub 2021 Sep 22.

Division of Diabetes, Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee, USA.

Islet-enriched transcription factors (TFs) exert broad control over cellular processes in pancreatic α and β cells, and changes in their expression are associated with developmental state and diabetes. However, the implications of heterogeneity in TF expression across islet cell populations are not well understood. To define this TF heterogeneity and its consequences for cellular function, we profiled more than 40,000 cells from normal human islets by single-cell RNA-Seq and stratified α and β cells based on combinatorial TF expression. Subpopulations of islet cells coexpressing ARX/MAFB (α cells) and MAFA/MAFB (β cells) exhibited greater expression of key genes related to glucose sensing and hormone secretion relative to subpopulations expressing only one or neither TF. Moreover, all subpopulations were identified in native pancreatic tissue from multiple donors. By Patch-Seq, MAFA/MAFB-coexpressing β cells showed enhanced electrophysiological activity. Thus, these results indicate that combinatorial TF expression in islet α and β cells predicts highly functional, mature subpopulations.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1172/jci.insight.151621DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8492318PMC
September 2021

Integrated human pseudoislet system and microfluidic platform demonstrate differences in GPCR signaling in islet cells.

JCI Insight 2020 05 21;5(10). Epub 2020 May 21.

Division of Diabetes, Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee, USA.

Pancreatic islets secrete insulin from β cells and glucagon from α cells, and dysregulated secretion of these hormones is a central component of diabetes. Thus, an improved understanding of the pathways governing coordinated β and α cell hormone secretion will provide insight into islet dysfunction in diabetes. However, the 3D multicellular islet architecture, essential for coordinated islet function, presents experimental challenges for mechanistic studies of intracellular signaling pathways in primary islet cells. Here, we developed an integrated approach to study the function of primary human islet cells using genetically modified pseudoislets that resemble native islets across multiple parameters. Further, we developed a microperifusion system that allowed synchronous acquisition of GCaMP6f biosensor signal and hormone secretory profiles. We demonstrate the utility of this experimental approach by studying the effects of Gi and Gq GPCR pathways on insulin and glucagon secretion by expressing the designer receptors exclusively activated by designer drugs (DREADDs) hM4Di or hM3Dq. Activation of Gi signaling reduced insulin and glucagon secretion, while activation of Gq signaling stimulated glucagon secretion but had both stimulatory and inhibitory effects on insulin secretion, which occur through changes in intracellular Ca2+. The experimental approach of combining pseudoislets with a microfluidic system allowed the coregistration of intracellular signaling dynamics and hormone secretion and demonstrated differences in GPCR signaling pathways between human β and α cells.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1172/jci.insight.137017DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7259531PMC
May 2020

Modeling Monogenic Diabetes using Human ESCs Reveals Developmental and Metabolic Deficiencies Caused by Mutations in HNF1A.

Cell Stem Cell 2019 08;25(2):273-289.e5

Center for Cellular and Molecular Therapeutics, The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA, USA; Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA, USA. Electronic address:

Human monogenic diabetes, caused by mutations in genes involved in beta cell development and function, has been a challenge to study because multiple mouse models have not fully recapitulated the human disease. Here, we use genome edited human embryonic stem cells to understand the most common form of monogenic diabetes, MODY3, caused by mutations in the transcription factor HNF1A. We found that HNF1A is necessary to repress an alpha cell gene expression signature, maintain endocrine cell function, and regulate cellular metabolism. In addition, we identified the human-specific long non-coding RNA, LINKA, as an HNF1A target necessary for normal mitochondrial respiration. These findings provide a possible explanation for the species difference in disease phenotypes observed with HNF1A mutations and offer mechanistic insights into how the HNF1A gene may also influence type 2 diabetes.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.stem.2019.07.007DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6785828PMC
August 2019

Imaging mass spectrometry enables molecular profiling of mouse and human pancreatic tissue.

Diabetologia 2019 06 6;62(6):1036-1047. Epub 2019 Apr 6.

9160 MRB III, Department of Biochemistry, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, 37232, USA.

Aims/hypothesis: The molecular response and function of pancreatic islet cells during metabolic stress is a complex process. The anatomical location and small size of pancreatic islets coupled with current methodological limitations have prevented the achievement of a complete, coherent picture of the role that lipids and proteins play in cellular processes under normal conditions and in diseased states. Herein, we describe the development of untargeted tissue imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) technologies for the study of in situ protein and, more specifically, lipid distributions in murine and human pancreases.

Methods: We developed matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation (MALDI) IMS protocols to study metabolite, lipid and protein distributions in mouse (wild-type and ob/ob mouse models) and human pancreases. IMS allows for the facile discrimination of chemically similar lipid and metabolite isoforms that cannot be distinguished using standard immunohistochemical techniques. Co-registration of MS images with immunofluorescence images acquired from serial tissue sections allowed accurate cross-registration of cell types. By acquiring immunofluorescence images first, this serial section approach guides targeted high spatial resolution IMS analyses (down to 15 μm) of regions of interest and leads to reduced time requirements for data acquisition.

Results: MALDI IMS enabled the molecular identification of specific phospholipid and glycolipid isoforms in pancreatic islets with intra-islet spatial resolution. This technology shows that subtle differences in the chemical structure of phospholipids can dramatically affect their distribution patterns and, presumably, cellular function within the islet and exocrine compartments of the pancreas (e.g. 18:1 vs 18:2 fatty acyl groups in phosphatidylcholine lipids). We also observed the localisation of specific GM3 ganglioside lipids [GM3(d34:1), GM3(d36:1), GM3(d38:1) and GM3(d40:1)] within murine islet cells that were correlated with a higher level of GM3 synthase as verified by immunostaining. However, in human pancreas, GM3 gangliosides were equally distributed in both the endocrine and exocrine tissue, with only one GM3 isoform showing islet-specific localisation.

Conclusions/interpretation: The development of more complete molecular profiles of pancreatic tissue will provide important insight into the molecular state of the pancreas during islet development, normal function, and diseased states. For example, this study demonstrates that these results can provide novel insight into the potential signalling mechanisms involving phospholipids and glycolipids that would be difficult to detect by targeted methods, and can help raise new hypotheses about the types of physiological control exerted on endocrine hormone-producing cells in islets. Importantly, the in situ measurements afforded by IMS do not require a priori knowledge of molecules of interest and are not susceptible to the limitations of immunohistochemistry, providing the opportunity for novel biomarker discovery. Notably, the presence of multiple GM3 isoforms in mouse islets and the differential localisation of lipids in human tissue underscore the important role these molecules play in regulating insulin modulation and suggest species, organ, and cell specificity. This approach demonstrates the importance of both high spatial resolution and high molecular specificity to accurately survey the molecular composition of complex, multi-functional tissues such as the pancreas.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00125-019-4855-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6553460PMC
June 2019

HLA Class II Antigen Processing and Presentation Pathway Components Demonstrated by Transcriptome and Protein Analyses of Islet β-Cells From Donors With Type 1 Diabetes.

Diabetes 2019 05 4;68(5):988-1001. Epub 2019 Mar 4.

Division of Diabetes, Department of Medicine, Diabetes Center of Excellence, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA

Type 1 diabetes studies consistently generate data showing islet β-cell dysfunction and T cell-mediated anti-β-cell-specific autoimmunity. To explore the pathogenesis, we interrogated the β-cell transcriptomes from donors with and without type 1 diabetes using both bulk-sorted and single β-cells. Consistent with immunohistological studies, β-cells from donors with type 1 diabetes displayed increased Class I transcripts and associated mRNA species. These β-cells also expressed mRNA for Class II and Class II antigen presentation pathway components, but lacked the macrophage marker CD68. Immunohistological study of three independent cohorts of donors with recent-onset type 1 diabetes showed Class II protein and its transcriptional regulator Class II MHC -activator protein expressed by a subset of insulinCD68 β-cells, specifically found in islets with lymphocytic infiltrates. β-Cell surface expression of HLA Class II was detected on a portion of CD45insulin β-cells from donors with type 1 diabetes by immunofluorescence and flow cytometry. Our data demonstrate that pancreatic β-cells from donors with type 1 diabetes express Class II molecules on selected cells with other key genes in those pathways and inflammation-associated genes. β-Cell expression of Class II molecules suggests that β-cells may interact directly with islet-infiltrating CD4 T cells and may play an immunopathogenic role.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.2337/db18-0686DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6477908PMC
May 2019

Human islets expressing HNF1A variant have defective β cell transcriptional regulatory networks.

J Clin Invest 2019 01 3;129(1):246-251. Epub 2018 Dec 3.

Department of Molecular Physiology and Biophysics, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee, USA.

Using an integrated approach to characterize the pancreatic tissue and isolated islets from a 33-year-old with 17 years of type 1 diabetes (T1D), we found that donor islets contained β cells without insulitis and lacked glucose-stimulated insulin secretion despite a normal insulin response to cAMP-evoked stimulation. With these unexpected findings for T1D, we sequenced the donor DNA and found a pathogenic heterozygous variant in the gene encoding hepatocyte nuclear factor-1α (HNF1A). In one of the first studies of human pancreatic islets with a disease-causing HNF1A variant associated with the most common form of monogenic diabetes, we found that HNF1A dysfunction leads to insulin-insufficient diabetes reminiscent of T1D by impacting the regulatory processes critical for glucose-stimulated insulin secretion and suggest a rationale for a therapeutic alternative to current treatment.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1172/JCI121994DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6307934PMC
January 2019

Examining How the MAFB Transcription Factor Affects Islet β-Cell Function Postnatally.

Diabetes 2019 02 13;68(2):337-348. Epub 2018 Nov 13.

Department of Molecular Physiology and Biophysics, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN

The sustained expression of the MAFB transcription factor in human islet β-cells represents a distinct difference in mice. Moreover, mRNA expression of closely related and islet β-cell-enriched MAFA does not peak in humans until after 9 years of age. We show that the MAFA protein also is weakly produced within the juvenile human islet β-cell population and that expression is postnatally restricted in mouse β-cells by de novo DNA methylation. To gain insight into how MAFB affects human β-cells, we developed a mouse model to ectopically express in adult mouse β-cells using transcriptional control sequences. Coexpression of MafB with MafA had no overt impact on mouse β-cells, suggesting that the human adult β-cell MAFA/MAFB heterodimer is functionally equivalent to the mouse MafA homodimer. However, MafB alone was unable to rescue the islet β-cell defects in a mouse mutant lacking MafA in β-cells. Of note, transgenic production of MafB in β-cells elevated tryptophan hydroxylase 1 mRNA production during pregnancy, which drives the serotonin biosynthesis critical for adaptive maternal β-cell responses. Together, these studies provide novel insight into the role of MAFB in human islet β-cells.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.2337/db18-0903DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6341297PMC
February 2019

α Cell Function and Gene Expression Are Compromised in Type 1 Diabetes.

Cell Rep 2018 03;22(10):2667-2676

Department of Medicine, Division of Diabetes, Endocrinology and Metabolism, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN, USA; Department of Molecular Physiology and Biophysics, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, USA; Department of Veterans Affairs, Tennessee Valley Healthcare System, Nashville, TN, USA. Electronic address:

Many patients with type 1 diabetes (T1D) have residual β cells producing small amounts of C-peptide long after disease onset but develop an inadequate glucagon response to hypoglycemia following T1D diagnosis. The features of these residual β cells and α cells in the islet endocrine compartment are largely unknown, due to the difficulty of comprehensive investigation. By studying the T1D pancreas and isolated islets, we show that remnant β cells appeared to maintain several aspects of regulated insulin secretion. However, the function of T1D α cells was markedly reduced, and these cells had alterations in transcription factors constituting α and β cell identity. In the native pancreas and after placing the T1D islets into a non-autoimmune, normoglycemic in vivo environment, there was no evidence of α-to-β cell conversion. These results suggest an explanation for the disordered T1D counterregulatory glucagon response to hypoglycemia.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.celrep.2018.02.032DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6368357PMC
March 2018

Analysis of self-antigen specificity of islet-infiltrating T cells from human donors with type 1 diabetes.

Nat Med 2016 12 31;22(12):1482-1487. Epub 2016 Oct 31.

Department of Medicine, Division of Diabetes, Diabetes Center of Excellence, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, Massachusetts, USA.

A major therapeutic goal for type 1 diabetes (T1D) is to induce autoantigen-specific tolerance of T cells. This could suppress autoimmunity in those at risk for the development of T1D, as well as in those with established disease who receive islet replacement or regeneration therapy. Because functional studies of human autoreactive T cell responses have been limited largely to peripheral blood-derived T cells, it is unclear how representative the peripheral T cell repertoire is of T cells infiltrating the islets. Our knowledge of the insulitic T cell repertoire is derived from histological and immunohistochemical analyses of insulitis, the identification of autoreactive CD8 T cells in situ, in islets of human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-A2 donors and isolation and identification of DQ8 and DQ2-DQ8 heterodimer-restricted, proinsulin-reactive CD4 T cells grown from islets of a single donor with T1D. Here we present an analysis of 50 of a total of 236 CD4 and CD8 T cell lines grown from individual handpicked islets or clones directly sorted from handpicked, dispersed islets from nine donors with T1D. Seventeen of these T cell lines and clones reacted to a broad range of studied native islet antigens and to post-translationally modified peptides. These studies demonstrate the existence of a variety of islet-infiltrating, islet-autoantigen reactive T cells in individuals with T1D, and these data have implications for the design of successful immunotherapies.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nm.4203DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5140746PMC
December 2016

A workshop on leadership for senior MD-PhD students.

Med Educ Online 2016 5;21:31534. Epub 2016 Aug 5.

Medical Scientist Training Program, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN, USA.

Leadership skills are essential for a successful career as a physician-scientist, yet many MD-PhD training programs do not offer formal training in leadership. The Vanderbilt Medical Scientist Training Program (MSTP) previously established a 2-day leadership workshop that has been held biennially since 2006 for students in the first and second years of the graduate school portion of combined MD and PhD training (G1/G2 students). Workshop attendees have consistently rated this workshop as a highly effective experience. However, opportunities for structured training in leadership competencies during the subsequent 3-5 years of MD-PhD training are limited. Given the success of the G1/G2 leadership workshop and the need for continuity in this model of leadership training, we developed a half-day workshop for MSTP students in the clinical years of medical school (M3/M4 students) to foster continued training in leadership. Our workshop curriculum, based in part on original cases drafted by Vanderbilt MSTP students, provides concrete strategies to manage conflict and navigate leadership transitions in the physician-scientist career path. The curriculum emphasizes both short-term competencies, such as effective participation as a member of a clinical team, and long-term competencies, such as leadership of a research team, division, or department. Our inaugural senior leadership workshop, held in August, 2015, was judged by student participants to be well organized and highly relevant to leadership concepts and skills. It will be offered biennially in our training curriculum for M3 and M4 MSTP students.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4976303PMC
http://dx.doi.org/10.3402/meo.v21.31534DOI Listing
July 2017

Microglia are essential to masculinization of brain and behavior.

J Neurosci 2013 Feb;33(7):2761-72

Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, University of Maryland Baltimore, Baltimore, Maryland 21201, USA.

Brain sexual differentiation in rodents results from the perinatal testicular androgen surge. In the preoptic area (POA), estradiol aromatized from testosterone upregulates the production of the proinflammatory molecule, prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) to produce sex-specific brain development. PGE(2) produces a two-fold greater density of dendritic spines in males than in females and masculinizes adult copulatory behavior. One neonatal dose of PGE(2) masculinizes the POA and behavior, and simultaneous treatment with an inhibitor of additional prostaglandin synthesis prevents this masculinization, indicating a positive feedforward process that leads to sustained increases in PGE(2). The mechanisms underlying this feedforward process were unknown. Microglia, the primary immunocompetent cells in the brain, are active neonatally, contribute to normal brain development, and both produce and respond to prostaglandins. We investigated whether there are sex differences in microglia in the POA and whether they influence developmental masculinization. Neonatal males had twice as many ameboid microglia as females and a more activated morphological profile, and both estradiol and PGE(2) masculinized microglial number and morphology in females. Microglial inhibition during the critical period for sexual differentiation prevented sex differences in microglia, estradiol-induced masculinization of dendritic spine density, and adult copulatory behavior. Microglial inhibition also prevented the estradiol-induced upregulation of PGE(2), indicating that microglia are essential to the feedforward process through which estradiol upregulates prostaglandin production. These studies demonstrate that immune cells in the brain interact with the nervous and endocrine systems during development, and are crucial for sexual differentiation of brain and behavior.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1523/JNEUROSCI.1268-12.2013DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3727162PMC
February 2013
-->