Publications by authors named "R Rodriguez-Jimenez"

122 Publications

The prevention of relapses in first episodes of schizophrenia: The 2EPs Project, background, rationale and study design.

Rev Psiquiatr Salud Ment (Engl Ed) 2021 Jul-Sep;14(3):164-176

Grupo de Investigación en Neuropsicofarmacología y Psicobiología, Departamento de Neurociencias, Universidad de Cádiz, Instituto de Investigación e Innovación en Ciencias Biomédicas de Cádiz, INiBICA, Hospital Universitario Puerta del Mar, CIBERSAM, Cádiz, Spain.

Up to 80% of first-episode psychosis patients suffer a relapse within five years of the remission. Relapse should be an important focus of prevention given the potential harm to the patient and family. It threatens to disrupt their psychosocial recovery, increases the risk of resistance to treatment and has been associated with greater direct and indirect costs for society. Based on a previous project entitled "Genotype-phenotype and environment. Application to a predictive model in first psychotic episodes" (PEPs Project), the project "Clinical and neurobiological determinants of second episodes of schizophrenia. Longitudinal study of first episode of psychosis" was designed, also known as the 2EPs Project. It aimed to identify and characterize those factors that predict a relapse within the years immediately following a first episode. This project has focused on following the clinical course, with neuropsychological assessments, biological and neuroanatomical measures, genetic adherence and physical health monitoring in order to compare a subgroup of patients with a second episode to another group of patients which remains in remission. The main objective of the present article is to describe the rationale of the 2EPs Project, explaining the measurement approach adopted and providing an overview of the selected clinical and functional measures. 2EPs Project is a multicenter, coordinated, naturalistic, longitudinal follow-up study over three years in a Spanish sample of patients in remission after a first-psychotic episode of schizophrenia. It is closely monitoring the clinical course of the cases recruited to compare the subgroup of patients with a second episode to that which remains in remission. The sample is composed of 223 subjects recruited from 15 clinical centres in Spain with experience of the preceding PEPs Study project, albeit 2EPs being an expanded version with new basic groups in biological research. From the total sample recruited, 63 patients presented a relapse (44%). 2EPs arose to characterize first episodes in an exhaustive, novel and multimodal way, thus contributing towards the development of a predictive model of relapse. Identifying the characteristics of patients who relapse could improve early detection and intervention.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.rpsmen.2021.08.001DOI Listing
May 2020

Social Cognition and Interaction Training (SCIT) versus Training in Affect Recognition (TAR) in patients with schizophrenia: A randomized controlled trial.

J Psychiatr Res 2021 Oct 23;142:101-109. Epub 2021 Jul 23.

Department of Psychology and Neuroscience, University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill, USA; Australian Catholic University, School of Behavioural and Health Sciences, Melbourne, VIC, Australia.

Introduction: Training in Affect Recognition (TAR) is a "targeted" and computer-aided program that has been shown to effectively attenuate facial affect recognition deficits and improve social functioning in patients with schizophrenia. Social Cognition and Interaction Training (SCIT) is a group "broad-based" intervention, that has also been shown to improve emotion recognition, theory of mind (ToM), and social functioning. To date, no study has compared the efficacy of two different social cognitive interventions.

Objectives: We aim to compare the efficacy of TAR and SCIT on schizophrenia patients' performance on facial affect recognition, theory of mind, attributional style and social functioning before, after treatment, and three months thereafter.

Methods: One hundred outpatients with a diagnosis of schizophrenia were randomly assigned to the TAR or SCIT condition and completed pre- (T0) and posttreatment (T1) assessments and a 3-month follow up (T2) of emotion recognition (ER-40), theory of mind (Hinting Task), attributional style (AIHQ) and social functioning (PSP).

Results: The entire sample, receiving TAR or SCIT, showed improvements in theory of mind, attributional style, clinical symptoms and social functioning. This effect was maintained at three-months. The TAR intervention was more efficacious than the SCIT program in improving the recognition of facial emotions (ER-40). The TAR intervention also demonstrated a lower drop-out rate than the SCIT intervention.

Conclusions: There were improvements in social cognition, symptomatology and functioning of patients in the entire sample, receiving SCIT or TAR. Both TAR and SCIT appear as valuable treatments for people with schizophrenia and social cognitive deficits.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jpsychires.2021.07.029DOI Listing
October 2021

Diagnostic concordance between Primary Care and Mental Health.

Actas Esp Psiquiatr 2021 Jul 1;49(4):129-134. Epub 2021 Jul 1.

Mental Health Service, Hospital Universitario 12 de Octubre, Madrid, Spain. Department of Psychiatry, Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria Hospital Universitario 12 de Octubre (imas12), Madrid, Spain. Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Salud Mental (CIBERSAM), Madrid, Spain. CogPsy-Group, Universidad Complutense de Madrid (UCM), Madrid, Spain.

To analyse the diagnostic concordance index between Primary Care and Mental Health.
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July 2021

Letter to the Editor: Targeting adverse stress-related consequences of the COVID-19 crisis in individuals with psychotic disorders and childhood maltreatment.

J Psychiatr Res 2021 06 30;138:453-455. Epub 2021 Apr 30.

Department of Psychiatry, Biomedical Research Institute, University Hospital 12 de Octubre (imas12), Faculty of Medicine, Complutense University of Madrid (UCM), Madrid, Spain; CIBERSAM (Biomedical Research Networking Centre in Mental Health), Spain.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jpsychires.2021.04.031DOI Listing
June 2021

Facial Affect Recognition by Patients with Schizophrenia Using Human Avatars.

J Clin Med 2021 Apr 28;10(9). Epub 2021 Apr 28.

Servicio de Salud Mental, Complejo Hospitalario Universitario de Albacete, 02006 Albacete, Spain.

People with schizophrenia have difficulty recognizing the emotions in the facial expressions of others, which affects their social interaction and functioning in the community. Static stimuli such as photographs have been used traditionally to examine deficiencies in the recognition of emotions in patients with schizophrenia, which has been criticized by some authors for lacking the dynamism that real facial stimuli have. With the aim of overcoming these drawbacks, in recent years, the creation and validation of virtual humans has been developed. This work presents the results of a study that evaluated facial recognition of emotions through a new set of dynamic virtual humans previously designed by the research team, in patients diagnosed of schizophrenia. The study included 56 stable patients, compared with 56 healthy controls. Our results showed that patients with schizophrenia present a deficit in facial affect recognition, compared to healthy controls (average hit rate 71.6% for patients vs 90.0% for controls). Facial expressions with greater dynamism (compared to less dynamic ones), as well as those presented from frontal view (compared to profile view) were better recognized in both groups. Regarding clinical and sociodemographic variables, the number of hospitalizations throughout life did not correlate with recognition rates. There was also no correlation between functioning or quality of life and recognition. A trend showed a reduction in the emotional recognition rate as a result of increases in Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS), being statistically significant for negative PANSS. Patients presented a learning effect during the progression of the task, slightly greater in comparison to the control group. This finding is relevant when designing training interventions for people with schizophrenia. Maintaining the attention of patients and getting them to improve in the proposed tasks is a challenge for today's psychiatry.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/jcm10091904DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8124197PMC
April 2021
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