Publications by authors named "R J Sinha"

2,771 Publications

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Coffee consumption and gastric cancer: a pooled analysis from the Stomach cancer Pooling Project consortium.

Eur J Cancer Prev 2021 Sep 17. Epub 2021 Sep 17.

Department of Clinical Sciences and Community Health, Branch of Medical Statistics, Biometry and Epidemiology "G.A. Maccacaro", University of Milan, Milan, Italy Hellenic Health Foundation, Athens, Greece Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences L. Sacco Department of Pathophysiology and Transplantation, University of Milan, Milan, Italy Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, Rockville, Maryland, USA School of Epidemiology, Public Health and Preventive Medicine, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada Harbin Medical University, Harbin, China Cancer Risk Factors and Life-Style Epidemiology Unit, Institute for Cancer Research, Prevention and Clinical Network, ISPRO, Florence, Italy EPIUnit - Instituto de Saúde Pública da Universidade do Porto Departamento de Ciências da Saúde Pública e Forenses e Educação Médica, Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade do Porto, Porto, Portugal Epidemiology and Prevention Group, Center for Public Health Sciences, National Cancer Center, Tokyo, Japan Nikkei Disease Prevention Center, São Paulo, Brazil Mexico National Institute of Public Health, Morelos, Mexico Department of Biostatistics, Yale School of Public Health, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut, USA Department of Epidemiology and Prevention, Russian N.N. Blokhin Cancer Research Center, Moscow, Russia Consortium for Biomedical Research in Epidemiology and Public Health (CIBERESP) Cancer Epidemiology Section, Public Health Division, Department of Health of Madrid, Madrid Research Group in Gene-Environment Interactions and Health, University of León, León Nutritional Epidemiology Unit, Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria y Biomédica de Alicante, ISABIAL-UMH, Alicante, Spain Department of Epidemiology, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health and Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, Los Angeles, California Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Centre, New York, New York, USA Department of Hygiene, Epidemiology and Medical Statistics, School of Medicine, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece Department of Epidemiology, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA Department of Public and Community Health, School of Public Health, University of West Attica, Athens 2nd Pulmonary Medicine Department, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Medical School, "ATTIKON" University Hospital, Haidari, Greece Digestive Oncology Research Center, Digestive Disease Research Institute, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran Centro Internacional de Pesquisa, A. C. Camargo Cancer Center, São Paulo, Brazil Section of Hygiene, University Department of Life Sciences and Public Health, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore Department of Woman and Child Health and Public Health - Public Health Area, Fondazione Policlinico Universitario A. Gemelli IRCCS, Roma, Italia Stony Brook Cancer Center, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New York, USA Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences, University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy.

Objective: This study aimed to evaluate and quantify the relationship between coffee and gastric cancer using a uniquely large dataset from an international consortium of observational studies on gastric cancer, including data from 18 studies, for a total of 8198 cases and 21 419 controls.

Methods: A two-stage approach was used to obtain the pooled odds ratios (ORs) and the corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for coffee drinkers versus never or rare drinkers. A one-stage logistic mixed-effects model with a random intercept for each study was used to estimate the dose-response relationship. Estimates were adjusted for sex, age and the main recognized risk factors for gastric cancer.

Results: Compared to never or rare coffee drinkers, the estimated pooled OR for coffee drinkers was 1.03 (95% CI, 0.94-1.13). When the amount of coffee intake was considered, the pooled ORs were 0.91 (95% CI, 0.81-1.03) for drinkers of 1-2 cups per day, 0.95 (95% CI, 0.82-1.10) for 3-4 cups, and 0.95 (95% CI, 0.79-1.15) for five or more cups. An OR of 1.20 (95% CI, 0.91-1.58) was found for heavy coffee drinkers (seven or more cups of caffeinated coffee per day). A positive association emerged for high coffee intake (five or more cups per day) for gastric cardia cancer only.

Conclusions: These findings better quantify the previously available evidence of the absence of a relevant association between coffee consumption and gastric cancer.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/CEJ.0000000000000680DOI Listing
September 2021

Detection of Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) in Cyanobacteria Using the Oxidant-sensing Probe 2',7'-Dichlorodihydrofluorescein Diacetate (DCFH-DA).

Bio Protoc 2017 Sep 5;7(17):e2545. Epub 2017 Sep 5.

Laboratory of Photobiology and Molecular Microbiology, Centre of Advanced Study in Botany, Institute of Science, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi, India.

Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are cell signaling molecules synthesized inside the cells as a response to routine metabolic processes. In stress conditions such as ultraviolet radiation (UVR), ROS concentration increases several folds in the cells that become toxic for the cell survival. Here we present the method for detection of ROS by using an oxidant-sensing probe 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (DCFH-DA) in cyanobacteria. This method provides reliable, simple, rapid and cost effective means for detection of ROS in cyanobacteria.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.21769/BioProtoc.2545DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8413551PMC
September 2017

Donor-Derived Cell-Free DNA Levels Predict Graft Injury in Liver Transplant Recipients.

Am J Transplant 2021 Sep 12. Epub 2021 Sep 12.

University of Arizona College of Medicine Tucson, AZ, USA.

Donor-derived cell-free DNA (dd-cfDNA) has been evaluated as a rejection marker in organ transplantation. This study sought to assess the utility of dd-cfDNA to diagnose graft injury in liver transplant recipients (LTR) and as a predictive biomarker prior to different causes of graft dysfunction. Plasma from single and multicenter LTR cohorts was analyzed for dd-cfDNA. Phenotypes of treated biopsy-proven acute rejection (AR, N=57), normal function (TX, N=94), and acute dysfunction no rejection (ADNR; N=68) were divided into training and test sets. In the training set, dd-cfDNA was significantly different between AR vs. TX (AUC 0.95, 5.3% cutoff) and AR vs. ADNR (AUC 0.71, 20.4% cutoff). Using these cutoffs in the test set, the accuracy and NPV were 87% and 100% (AR vs. TX) and 66.7% and 87.8% (AR vs. ADNR). Blood samples collected serially from LTR demonstrated incremental elevations in dd-cfDNA prior to the onset of graft dysfunction (AR>ADNR), but not in TX. Dd-cfDNA also decreased following treatment of rejection. In conclusion, serial elevation of dd-cfDNA identifies pre-clinical graft injury in the context of normal liver function tests and is greatest in rejection. This biomarker may help detect early signs of graft injury and rejection to inform LTR management strategies.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/ajt.16835DOI Listing
September 2021

Orthopedic Implant Removal in the Department of Orthopedics of a Tertiary Care Centre of Nepal: A Descriptive Cross-sectional Study.

JNMA J Nepal Med Assoc 2021 Feb 28;59(234):116-119. Epub 2021 Feb 28.

Department of Orthopedics, Nepalese Army Institute of Health Sciences, Shree Birendra Hospital, Chhauni, Kathmandu, Nepal.

Introduction: Implant removal surgery is one of the common surgical procedures done in orthopedics. Studies report that a major portion of orthopedic surgeries carried out in different institutions comprises implant removal procedures. This can be challenging in limited manpower and infrastructure availability scenarios, like in developing countries like Nepal. This study aims to study the prevalence of orthopedic implant removal procedures carried out among overall surgical procedures in the orthopedic department of a tertiary care center in Nepal.

Methods: A descriptive cross-sectional study was performed on the medical records of the department of orthopedics of a tertiary care center after approval from the institutional review committee. The data included records from the starting of 2018 to the end of 2019. Data related to the number of implant removal procedures, types of implants, indications, fracture sites, anesthesia use, gender and age distribution were studied. Statistical Package for Social Sciences version 20 was used to study descriptive data.

Results: Out of 2557 orthopedic operations carried out in the study duration, 458 (17.91%) of implant removal procedures were done in the department. The most common age group was the young adult age group, 255 (55.68%). Medium-sized implants were the commonly removed ones, 337 (73.58%). Elective procedures were the most common indication, 369 (80.57%).

Conclusions: Implant removal procedures cover a major fraction of overall orthopedic operations carried out by the department, most of which are elective procedures. In limited-resource settings, this can be challenging, and a proper evaluation with counseling could be done before implant removal surgery.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.31729/jnma.6171DOI Listing
February 2021

Ertugliflozin and Slope of Chronic eGFR: Prespecified Analyses from the Randomized VERTIS CV Trial.

Clin J Am Soc Nephrol 2021 Sep 18;16(9):1345-1354. Epub 2021 Jun 18.

Merck & Co., Inc., Kenilworth, New Jersey.

Background And Objectives: A reduction in the rate of eGFR decline, with preservation of ≥0.75 ml/min per 1.73 m per year, has been proposed as a surrogate for kidney disease progression. We report results from prespecified analyses assessing effects of ertugliflozin versus placebo on eGFR slope from the eValuation of ERTugliflozin effIcacy and Safety CardioVascular outcomes (VERTIS CV) trial (NCT01986881).

Design, Setting, Participants, & Measurements: Patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and established atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease were randomized to placebo, ertugliflozin 5 mg, and ertugliflozin 15 mg (1:1:1). The analyses compared the effect of ertugliflozin (pooled doses, =5499) versus placebo (=2747) on eGFR slope per week and per year by random coefficient models. Study periods (weeks 0-6 and weeks 6-52) and total and chronic slopes (week 0 or week 6 to weeks 104, 156, 208, and 260) were modeled separately and by baseline kidney status.

Results: In the overall population, for weeks 0-6, the least squares mean eGFR slopes (ml/min per 1.73 m per week [95% confidence interval (95% CI)]) were -0.07 (-0.16 to 0.03) and -0.54 (-0.61 to -0.48) for the placebo and ertugliflozin groups, respectively; the difference was -0.47 (-0.59 to -0.36). During weeks 6-52, least squares mean eGFR slopes (ml/min per 1.73 m per year [95% CI]) were -0.12 (-0.70 to 0.46) and 1.62 (1.21 to 2.02) for the placebo and ertugliflozin groups, respectively; the difference was 1.74 (1.03 to 2.45). For weeks 6-156, least squares mean eGFR slopes (ml/min per 1.73 m per year [95% CI]) were -1.51 (-1.70 to -1.32) and -0.32 (-0.45 to -0.19) for the placebo and ertugliflozin groups, respectively; the difference was 1.19 (0.95 to 1.42). During weeks 0-156, the placebo-adjusted difference in least squares mean slope was 1.06 (0.85 to 1.27). These findings were consistent by baseline kidney status.

Conclusions: Ertugliflozin has a favorable placebo-adjusted eGFR slope >0.75 ml/min per 1.73 m per year, documenting the kidney function preservation underlying the clinical benefits of ertugliflozin on kidney disease progression in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease.

Clinical Trial Registry Name And Registration Number: US National Library of Medicine, ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01986881. Date of trial registration: November 13, 2013.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2215/CJN.01130121DOI Listing
September 2021
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