Publications by authors named "R Gómez de-la-Torre"

497 Publications

Endocannabinoid signaling of homeostatic status modulates functional connectivity in reward and salience networks.

Psychopharmacology (Berl) 2021 Jul 2. Epub 2021 Jul 2.

School of Psychological Sciences, Turner Institute for Brain and Mental Health, Monash University, Clayton VIC 3800, Melbourne, Australia.

Rationale: Endocannabinoids are well poised to regulate crosstalk between energy sensing of hunger and satiety and reward-driven motivation.

Objectives: Here, we aimed to unravel associations between plasma endocannabinoids and brain connectivity in homeostatic and reward circuits across hunger and satiety states.

Methods: Fifteen participants (7 females) underwent two counter-balanced resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging scans, one after overnight fasting and one after consumption of a standardized filling meal (satiety). Before each scan, we drew blood to measure plasma endocannabinoid concentrations (anandamide [AEA], anandamide-derived POEA, and 2-arachidonoylglycerol [2-AG]), analyzed with liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry.

Results: We found that AEA levels were associated with increased connectivity between the lateral hypothalamus and the ventral striatum during satiety. Furthermore, fasting AEA levels correlated with connectivity between the ventral striatum and the anterior cingulate cortex and the insula.

Conclusions: Altogether, results suggest that peripheral AEA concentrations are sensitive to homeostatic changes and linked to neural communication in reward and salience networks. Findings may have significant implications for understanding normal and abnormal interactions between homeostatic input and reward valuation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00213-021-05890-zDOI Listing
July 2021

Effects of a psychosocial intervention at one-year follow-up in a PREDIMED-plus sample with obesity and metabolic syndrome.

Sci Rep 2021 Apr 28;11(1):9144. Epub 2021 Apr 28.

Department of Psychiatry, University Hospital of Bellvitge-IDIBELL, Feixa Llarga S/N, L'Hospitalet del Llobregat, 08907, Barcelona, Spain.

This study examines if overweight/obesity are related to higher impulsivity, food addiction and depressive symptoms, and if these variables could be modified after 1 year of a multimodal intervention (diet, physical activity, psychosocial support). 342 adults (55-75 years) with overweight/obesity and metabolic syndrome (MetS) from the PREDIMED-Plus Cognition study were randomized to the intervention or to the control group (lifestyle recommendations). Cognitive and psychopathological assessments were performed at baseline and after 1-year follow-up. At baseline, higher impulsivity was linked to higher food addiction and depressive symptoms, but not to body mass index (BMI). Food addiction not only predicted higher BMI and depressive symptoms, but also achieved a mediational role between impulsivity and BMI/depressive symptoms. After 1 year, patients in both groups reported significant decreases in BMI, food addiction and impulsivity. BMI reduction and impulsivity improvements were higher in the intervention group. Higher BMI decrease was achieved in individuals with lower impulsivity. Higher scores in food addiction were also related to greater post-treatment impulsivity. To conclude, overweight/obesity are related to higher impulsivity, food addiction and depressive symptoms in mid/old age individuals with MetS. Our results also highlight the modifiable nature of the studied variables and the interest of promoting multimodal interventions within this population.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-021-88298-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8080657PMC
April 2021

Psychological and metabolic risk factors in older adults with a previous history of eating disorder: A cross-sectional study from the Predimed-Plus study.

Eur Eat Disord Rev 2021 Jul 27;29(4):575-587. Epub 2021 Apr 27.

Consorcio CIBER, M.P. Fisiopatología de la Obesidad y Nutrición (CIBERObn), Instituto de Salud Carlos III (ISCIII), Madrid, Spain.

Goals: To explore affective and cognitive status, later in life, in individuals with and without previous history of eating disorder (ED), and also its association with higher risk for metabolic syndrome (MetS) symptomatology.

Methods: A cross-sectional analysis of 6756 adults, aged 55-75 years with overweight/obesity and MetS participating in the Predimed-Plus study was conducted. Participants completed self-reported questionnaires to examine lifetime history of ED, according to DSM-5 criteria, and other psychopathological and neurocognitive factors. Anthropometric and metabolic measurements were also collected.

Results: Of the whole sample, 24 individuals (0.35%) reported a previous history of ED. In this subsample, there were more women and singles compared to their counterparts, but they also presented higher levels of depressive symptoms and higher cognitive impairment, but also higher body mass index (BMI) and severe obesity, than those without lifetime ED.

Conclusions: This is one of the first studies to analyse the cognitive and metabolic impact of a previous history of ED. The results showed that previous ED was associated with greater affective and cognitive impairment, but also with higher BMI, later in life. No other MetS risk factors were found, after controlling for relevant variables.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/erv.2833DOI Listing
July 2021

Daidzein modulates cocaine-reinforcing effects and cue-induced cocaine reinstatement in CD-1 male mice.

Psychopharmacology (Berl) 2021 Jul 11;238(7):1923-1936. Epub 2021 Apr 11.

Integrative Pharmacology and Systems Neuroscience Research Group, Hospital del Mar Medical Research Institute (IMIM), Parc de Recerca Biomedica de Barcelona (PRBB), C/Dr. Aiguader 88, 08003, Barcelona, Spain.

Rationale: Cocaine addiction is a chronic relapsing disorder that lacks of an effective treatment. Isoflavones are a family of compounds present in different plants and vegetables like soybeans that share a common chemical structure. Previous studies have described that synthetic derivatives from the natural isoflavone daidzin can modulate cocaine addiction, by a mechanism suggested to involve aldehyde-dehydrogenase (ALDH) activities.

Objectives: Based on these previous studies, we investigated the effects of three natural isoflavones, daidzin, daidzein, and genistein, on the modulation of the cocaine reinforcing effects and on cue-induced reinstatement in an operant mouse model of cocaine self-administration.

Results: Chronic treatment with daidzein or genistein decreased operant responding to obtain cocaine intravenous infusions. On the other hand, daidzein and daidzin, but not genistein, were effective in decreasing cue-induced cocaine reinstatement. Complementary studies revealed that daidzein effects on cocaine reinforcement were mediated through a mechanism that involved dopamine type-2/3 receptors (DA-D2/3) activities.

Conclusions: Our results suggest that these natural compounds alone or in combination can be a potential therapeutic approach for cocaine addiction. Further clinical studies are required in order to ascertain their potential therapeutic use.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00213-021-05820-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8233246PMC
July 2021

Prevention of cognitive decline in subjective cognitive decline APOE ε4 carriers after EGCG and a multimodal intervention (PENSA): Study design.

Alzheimers Dement (N Y) 2021 31;7(1):e12155. Epub 2021 Mar 31.

Integrative Pharmacology and Systems Neurosciences Research Group, Neurosciences Research Program Hospital del Mar Medical Research Institute (IMIM) Barcelona Spain.

Introduction: Subjects exhibiting subjective cognitive decline (SCD) are at an increased risk for mild cognitive impairment and dementia. Given the delay between risk exposure and disease onset, SCD individuals are increasingly considered a good target population for cost-effective lifestyle-based Alzheimer's disease prevention trials.

Methods: The PENSA study is a randomized, double-blind, controlled clinical trial that aims to evaluate the efficacy of a personalized multimodal intervention in lifestyle (diet counseling, physical activity, cognitive training, and social engagement) combined with the use of epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) over 12 months, in slowing down cognitive decline and improving brain connectivity. The study population includes 200 individuals meeting SCD criteria and carrying the apolipoprotein E ε4 allele, who will be randomized into four treatment arms (multimodal intervention + EGCG/placebo, or lifestyle recommendations + EGCG/placebo). The primary efficacy outcome is change in the composite score for cognitive performance measured with the Alzheimer's Disease Cooperative Study Preclinical Alzheimer Cognitive Composite (ADCS-PACC-like) adding to the original version the Interference score from the Stroop Color and Word Test and the Five Digit Test. Secondary efficacy outcomes are (1) change in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and structural neuronal connectivity (structural MRI) and (2) the safety assessment of the EGCG compound. This study is framed within the WW-FINGERS consortium.

Discussion: The use of new technologies (i.e., mobile ecological momentary assessments [EMAs], activity tracker) in the PENSA study allows the collection of continuous data on lifestyle behaviors (diet and physical activity) and mood, enabling a personalized design as well as an intensive follow-up of participants. These data will be used to give feedback to participants about their own performance along the intervention, promoting their involvement and adherence. The results of the study may aid researchers on the design of future clinical trials involving preventive lifestyle multicomponent interventions.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/trc2.12155DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8012239PMC
March 2021