Publications by authors named "R Cattaneo"

522 Publications

A recombinant Cedar virus based high-throughput screening assay for henipavirus antiviral discovery.

Antiviral Res 2021 May 30:105084. Epub 2021 May 30.

Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Uniformed Services University, Bethesda, MD, 20814, USA. Electronic address:

Nipah virus (NiV) and Hendra virus (HeV) are highly pathogenic, bat-borne paramyxoviruses in the genus Henipavirus that cause severe and often fatal acute respiratory and/or neurologic diseases in humans and livestock. There are currently no approved antiviral therapeutics or vaccines for use in humans to treat or prevent NiV or HeV infection. To facilitate development of henipavirus antivirals, a high-throughput screening (HTS) platform was developed based on a well-characterized recombinant version of the nonpathogenic Henipavirus, Cedar virus (rCedV). Using reverse genetics, a rCedV encoding firefly luciferase (rCedV-Luc) was rescued and its utility evaluated for high-throughput antiviral compound screening. The luciferase reporter gene signal kinetics of rCedV-Luc in different human cell lines was characterized and validated as an authentic real-time measure of viral growth. The rCedV-Luc platform was optimized as an HTS assay that demonstrated high sensitivity with robust Z' scores, excellent signal-to-background ratios and coefficients of variation. Eight candidate compounds that inhibited rCedV replication were identified for additional validation and demonstrated that 4 compounds inhibited authentic NiV-Bangladesh replication. Further evaluation of 2 of the 4 validated compounds in a 9-point dose response titration demonstrated potent antiviral activity against NiV-Bangladesh and HeV, with minimal cytotoxicity. This rCedV reporter can serve as a surrogate yet authentic BSL-2 henipavirus platform that will dramatically accelerate drug candidate identification in the development of anti-henipavirus therapies.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.antiviral.2021.105084DOI Listing
May 2021

Occupational exposure of rural workers to pesticides in a vegetable-producing region in Brazil.

Environ Sci Pollut Res Int 2021 May 20;28(20):25758-25769. Epub 2021 Jan 20.

Postgraduate Program in Environment and Sustainability (PPGAS), Environmental Toxicology Research Group, State University of Rio Grande do Sul, São Francisco de Paula, RS, Brazil.

The health of family farmers is at risk due to occupational exposure to pesticides. The aims of the current study were to investigate the level of farmers' perception of risks associated with pesticide use and to assess their health condition based on biochemical and immunological tests. Family farmers living in a vegetable-producing region in Southern Brazil were selected to participate in the study. More than 70% of the family farmers were often exposed to more than one type of pesticides; 41.2% were intensively using several pesticides for more than one decade and 74.4% were not using personal protective equipment (PPE) at the time of pesticide handling due to low perception of the risks posed by these chemicals. Enzymatic analysis performed in participants' blood samples showed changes in catalase (CAT) and glutathione reductase (GR) activity, in lipid peroxidation (TBARS) and carbonylated protein levels, as well as in chemoattractant (IL-8) and anti-inflammatory (IL-10) interleukin expression. Low perception of health-related risks posed by pesticides can be attributed to factors such as low schooling and lack of information, which put farmers' health at risk, as evidenced by blood biochemical and immunological changes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11356-021-12444-5DOI Listing
May 2021

Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2, COVID-19, and the Renin-Angiotensin System: Pressing Needs and Best Research Practices.

Hypertension 2020 11 28;76(5):1350-1367. Epub 2020 Sep 28.

Division of Nephrology and Hypertension (K.A.N., V.D.G.), Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN.

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic is associated with significant morbidity and mortality throughout the world, predominantly due to lung and cardiovascular injury. The virus responsible for COVID-19-severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2-gains entry into host cells via ACE2 (angiotensin-converting enzyme 2). ACE2 is a primary enzyme within the key counter-regulatory pathway of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS), which acts to oppose the actions of Ang (angiotensin) II by generating Ang-(1-7) to reduce inflammation and fibrosis and mitigate end organ damage. As COVID-19 spans multiple organ systems linked to the cardiovascular system, it is imperative to understand clearly how severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 may affect the multifaceted RAS. In addition, recognition of the role of ACE2 and the RAS in COVID-19 has renewed interest in its role in the pathophysiology of cardiovascular disease in general. We provide researchers with a framework of best practices in basic and clinical research to interrogate the RAS using appropriate methodology, especially those who are relatively new to the field. This is crucial, as there are many limitations inherent in investigating the RAS in experimental models and in humans. We discuss sound methodological approaches to quantifying enzyme content and activity (ACE, ACE2), peptides (Ang II, Ang-[1-7]), and receptors (types 1 and 2 Ang II receptors, Mas receptor). Our goal is to ensure appropriate research methodology for investigations of the RAS in patients with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 and COVID-19 to ensure optimal rigor and reproducibility and appropriate interpretation of results from these investigations.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1161/HYPERTENSIONAHA.120.15948DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7685174PMC
November 2020

Standard Correction of Vision Worsens EMG Activity of Pericranial Muscles in Chronic TMD Subjects.

Pain Res Manag 2020 13;2020:3932476. Epub 2020 Apr 13.

MeSVA Department, University of L'Aquila, P.le Salvatore Tommasi 11, 67100 L'Aquila, Italy.

Recent studies showed an evident correlation between the stomatognathic system and the visual system. These results suggest that subjects who are affected by both temporomandibular (TMD) disorders and refractive disorders present with altered control of pericranial musculature tone and higher open-eye electromyographic (EMG) values. The objective of this work was to evaluate the effects of standard vision correction on EMG in subjects suffering from TMD compared with application of the same vision treatments to non-TMD subjects. 40 subjects were enrolled in this study. The test group included 20 myopic subjects and also included patients with TMD. The control group included 20 healthy myopic subjects. All of the participants underwent a complete ocular examination and a sEMG analysis. The results showed that TMD subjects with vision disorders that are corrected with standard glasses present EMG values that are significantly higher than those presented by non-TMD subjects with vision disorders and standard glasses. Infact, in TMD subjects, eye correction did not have a positive effect on the stomatognathic or pericranial musculature.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2020/3932476DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7178530PMC
September 2020

Receptor-mediated cell entry of paramyxoviruses: Mechanisms, and consequences for tropism and pathogenesis.

J Biol Chem 2020 02 16;295(9):2771-2786. Epub 2020 Jan 16.

Department of Molecular Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota 55905. Electronic address:

Research in the last decade has uncovered many new paramyxoviruses, airborne agents that cause epidemic diseases in animals including humans. Most paramyxoviruses enter epithelial cells of the airway using sialic acid as a receptor and cause only mild disease. However, others cross the epithelial barrier and cause more severe disease. For some of these viruses, the host receptors have been identified, and the mechanisms of cell entry have been elucidated. The tetrameric attachment proteins of paramyxoviruses have vastly different binding affinities for their cognate receptors, which they contact through different binding surfaces. Nevertheless, all input signals are converted to the same output: conformational changes that trigger refolding of trimeric fusion proteins and membrane fusion. Experiments with selectively receptor-blinded viruses inoculated into their natural hosts have provided insights into tropism, identifying the cells and tissues that support growth and revealing the mechanisms of pathogenesis. These analyses also shed light on diabolically elegant mechanisms used by morbilliviruses, including the measles virus, to promote massive amplification within the host, followed by efficient aerosolization and rapid spread through host populations. In another paradigm of receptor-facilitated severe disease, henipaviruses, including Nipah and Hendra viruses, use different members of one protein family to cause zoonoses. Specific properties of different paramyxoviruses, like neurotoxicity and immunosuppression, are now understood in the light of receptor specificity. We propose that research on the specific receptors for several newly identified members of the family that may not bind sialic acid is needed to anticipate their zoonotic potential and to generate effective vaccines and antiviral compounds.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1074/jbc.REV119.009961DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7049954PMC
February 2020