Publications by authors named "R Abdul Hamid"

409 Publications

Comparison of in vitro fertilization cycles in couples with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection versus noninfected couples through a retrospective matched case-control study.

F S Rep 2021 Dec 8;2(4):376-385. Epub 2021 May 8.

Biologie de la Reproduction - Centre d'Etude et de Conservation des Oeufs et du Sperme humains, Hôpital Tenon, Paris, France.

Objective: To compare in vitro fertilization (IVF) outcomes in couples in which at least one partner is human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) positive with that of couples in which neither partner is HIV-positive.

Design: Retrospective matched case-control study.

Setting: Fertility center at Tenon Hospital, Paris, France.

Patients: A total of 179 IVF cycles in couples infected with HIV-1 and 179 IVF cycles in control couples.

Interventions: Ovarian stimulation, oocytes retrieval, IVF (standard and microinjection), embryo transfer, pregnancy, and live birth follow-up.

Main Outcome Measures: Live birth rate and IVF outcomes.

Results: The first comparison between HIV and non-HIV couples showed poorer outcomes in the HIV group (higher administered gonadotropin doses and longer stimulation periods, lower cumulative pregnancy and live birth rates, among other things). A subgroup analysis was performed in addition. No differences were found in the "men HIV" group compared with the controls. In contrast, poorer outcomes in the "women HIV" and "women and men HIV" groups were shown in terms of administered doses, duration of stimulation, and number of oocytes retrieved. For the "women HIV" group, lower cumulative clinical pregnancy and live birth rates were found.

Conclusion: The data suggested that couples with HIV-positive women have poorer medically assisted procreation outcomes than couples with non-HIV-infected women. Therefore, physicians should pay particular attention to couples with HIV-positive women.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.xfre.2021.04.008DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8655394PMC
December 2021

Choline Transporter regulates olfactory habituation via a neuronal triad of excitatory, inhibitory and mushroom body neurons.

PLoS Genet 2021 Dec 16;17(12):e1009938. Epub 2021 Dec 16.

Centre for Cellular and Molecular Biology, Council of Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR-CCMB), Hyderabad, India.

Choline is an essential component of Acetylcholine (ACh) biosynthesis pathway which requires high-affinity Choline transporter (ChT) for its uptake into the presynaptic terminals of cholinergic neurons. Previously, we had reported a predominant expression of ChT in memory processing and storing region of the Drosophila brain called mushroom bodies (MBs). It is unknown how ChT contributes to the functional principles of MB operation. Here, we demonstrate the role of ChT in Habituation, a non-associative form of learning. Odour driven habituation traces are laid down in ChT dependent manner in antennal lobes (AL), projection neurons (PNs), and MBs. We observed that reduced habituation due to knock-down of ChT in MBs causes hypersensitivity towards odour, suggesting that ChT also regulates incoming stimulus suppression. Importantly, we show for the first time that ChT is not unique to cholinergic neurons but is also required in inhibitory GABAergic neurons to drive habituation behaviour. Our results support a model in which ChT regulates both habituation and incoming stimuli through multiple circuit loci via an interplay between excitatory and inhibitory neurons. Strikingly, the lack of ChT in MBs shows characteristics similar to the major reported features of Autism spectrum disorders (ASD), including attenuated habituation, sensory hypersensitivity as well as defective GABAergic signalling. Our data establish the role of ChT in habituation and suggest that its dysfunction may contribute to neuropsychiatric disorders like ASD.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pgen.1009938DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8675691PMC
December 2021

COVID-19: Effect on gastroenterology and hepatology service provision and training: Lessons learnt and planning for the future.

World J Gastroenterol 2021 Nov;27(44):7625-7648

The Liver Unit, Queen Elizabeth Hospital, University Hospitals Birmingham NHS Foundation Trust, Birmingham B15 2WB, United Kingdom.

In late 2019, reports arose of a new respiratory disease in China, identified as a novel coronavirus, severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2. The World Health Organisation named the disease caused by the virus 'coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19)'. It was declared a pandemic in early 2020, after the disease rapidly spread across the world. COVID-19 has not only resulted in substantial morbidity and mortality but also significantly impacted healthcare service provision and training across all medical specialties with gastroenterology and Hepatology services being no exception. Internationally, most, if not all 'non-urgent' services have been placed on hold during surges of infections. As a result there have been delayed diagnoses, procedures, and surgeries which will undoubtedly result in increased morbidity and mortality. Outpatient services have been converted to remote consultations where possible in many countries. Trainees have been redeployed to help care for COVID-19 patients in other settings, resulting in disruption to their training - particularly endoscopy and outpatient clinics. This has led to significant anxiety amongst trainees, and risks prolongation of training. It is of the utmost importance to develop strategies that continue to support COVID-19-related service provision, whilst also supporting existing and future gastroenterology and Hepatology services and training. Changes to healthcare provision during the pandemic have generated new and improved frameworks of service and training delivery, which can be adopted in the post-COVID-19 world, leading to enhanced patient care.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3748/wjg.v27.i44.7625DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8641058PMC
November 2021

TCF7L2 rs7903146 Is Associated With Increased Risk of New-Onset Diabetes After Transplant: A Meta-analysis of Literature.

Transplant Proc 2021 Dec 9;53(10):2820-2825. Epub 2021 Nov 9.

Renal Transplant Unit, National Institute of Solid Organ and Tissue Transplantation, Dow University of Health Sciences, Karachi, Pakistan.

Background: Single nucleotide polymorphisms may influence the risk of development of new-onset diabetes after transplant (NODAT), a post-transplant clinical complication that is often implicated in allograft rejection and mortality. We performed a meta-analysis of association between transcription factor 7-like-2 (TCF7L2) rs7903146 and risk of NODAT.

Methods: A systematic search was conducted using PubMed and ScienceDirect electronic databases for studies published between January 2001 and January 2021. Case-control or cohort studies reporting association between NODAT (diagnosis based on American Diabetes Association criteria) and TCF7L2 rs7903146 were included. MetaGenyo was used for meta-analysis (random-effects model). Pooled odds ratios with 95% confidence intervals were reported to evaluate the strength of association.

Results: Two reviewers independently screened for articles. A total of 6 case-control studies were included for full-text review and quantitative analysis after screening for eligibility. Genotypic distributions were in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium for included studies. All articles reported statistically significant association of TCF7L2 rs7903146 for risk of NODAT except for 1 study. There was moderate heterogeneity among studies (I = 60.6%). Pooled analysis revealed 51% odds of developing NODAT with TCF7L2 rs7903146 T allele (allele contrast model: odds ratio, 1.51; 95% confidence interval, 1.13-2.02; P = .005).

Conclusions: The present meta-analysis demonstrated association between TCF7L2 variant rs7903146 and risk of developing NODAT. This finding suggest clinical implications for individuals undergoing kidney transplant.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.transproceed.2021.09.031DOI Listing
December 2021

Genic microsatellite marker characterization and development in little millet (Panicum sumatrense) using transcriptome sequencing.

Sci Rep 2021 10 18;11(1):20620. Epub 2021 Oct 18.

Main Oilseeds Research Station, Junagadh Agricultural University, Junagadh, Gujarat, India.

Little millet is a climate-resilient and high-nutrient value plant. The lack of molecular markers severely limits the adoption of modern genomic approaches in millet breeding studies. Here the transcriptome of three samples were sequenced. A total of 4443 genic-SSR motifs were identified in 30,220 unigene sequences. SSRs were found at a rate of 12.25 percent, with an average of one SSR locus per 10 kb. Among different repeat motifs, tri-nucleotide repeat (66.67) was the most abundant one, followed by di- (27.39P), and tetra- (3.83P) repeats. CDS contained fewer motifs with the majority of tri-nucleotides, while 3' and 5' UTR carry more motifs but have shorter repeats. Functional annotation of unigenes containing microsatellites, revealed that most of them were linked to metabolism, gene expression regulation, and response to environmental stresses. Fifty primers were randomly chosen and validated in five little millet and 20 minor millet genotypes; 48% showed polymorphism, with a high transferability (70%) rate. Identified microsatellites can be a noteworthy resource for future research into QTL-based breeding, genetic resource conservation, MAS selection, and evolutionary genetics.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-021-00100-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8523711PMC
October 2021
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