Publications by authors named "Quanshui Guo"

5 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Long-term responses of riparian plants' composition to water level fluctuation in China's Three Gorges Reservoir.

PLoS One 2018 28;13(11):e0207689. Epub 2018 Nov 28.

Key Laboratory of Forest Ecology and Environment of State Forestry Administration, Research Institute of Forest Ecology, Environment and Protection, Chinese Academy of Forestry, Haidian, Beijing, PR China.

The water level fluctuation zone (WLFZ) has experienced a novel hydrological regime due to the anti-seasonal operation of China's Three Gorges Reservoir. Overall, hydrological change can significantly influence the riparian environment and shift the riparian vegetation. Although numerous studies have investigated the short-term responses of riparian plants to water level fluctuation in this zone, few have addressed long-term effects. In this study, four permanent plots in the WLFZ of the canyon landform area were chosen to evaluate the long-term responses of riparian plants to water level fluctuation from 2008 to 2015 and to screen candidate plants for ecological restoration. We recorded 146 species in 2008, 110 species in 2009, 68 species in 2012 and 69 species in 2015, indicating a conspicuous loss in riparian plants. Most of the remnant plants were annual and perennial herbs. Of the native species present in 2008, 82, 22 and 8 had disappeared in 2009, 2012 and 2015, respectively. Simultaneously, 45, 15 and 11 non-native species were first found, respectively. Additionally, over half of the native and the non-native species were not found after being subjected to a water level fluctuation. From 2008 to 2015, only 27 native species always presented; however, not all of them were chosen as candidates for ecological restoration because of their decreased importance values. In contrast, the importance value of Cynodon dactylon increased over time, suggesting its high tolerance to long-term winter flooding. We concluded that riparian plants' composition of the canyon landform area dramatically declined after long-term water level fluctuation and their presence was determined by the novel hydrological condition. Our results also suggested that Cynodon dactylon or its combination with other species (i.e. Digitaria chrysoblephara, Setaria glauca, Setaria viridis) is a better candidate for ecological restoration in the WLFZ.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0207689PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6261589PMC
April 2019

Effect of off-season flooding on growth, photosynthesis, carbohydrate partitioning, and nutrient uptake in Distylium chinense.

PLoS One 2014 15;9(9):e107636. Epub 2014 Sep 15.

State Forestry Administration Key Laboratory of Forest Ecology and Environment, Research Institute of Forest Ecology, Environment and Protection, Chinese Academy of Forestry, Beijing, PR China.

Distylium chinense is an evergreen shrub used for the vegetation recovery of floodplain and riparian areas in Three Gorges Reservoir Region. To clarify the morphological and physiological responses and tolerance of Distylium chinense to off-season flooding, a simulation flooding experiment was conducted during autumn and winter. Results indicated that the survival rate of seedlings was 100%, and that plant height and stem diameter were not significantly affected by flooding. Adventitious roots and hypertrophic lenticels were observed in flooded seedlings after 30 days of flooding. Flooding significantly reduced the plant biomass of roots, net photosynthetic rate (Pn), stomatal conductance (gs), transpiration rate (Tr), maximum photochemical efficiency (Fv/Fm), photochemical quenching (qP), and electron transport rate (ETR) in leaves, and also affected the allocation and transport of carbohydrate and nutrients. However, D. chinense was able to maintain stable levels of Pn, Fv/Fm, qP, ETR, and nutrient content (N and P) in leaves and to store a certain amount of carbohydrate in roots over prolonged durations of flooding. Based on these results, we conclude that there is a high flooding tolerance in D. chinense, and the high survival rate of D. chinense may be attributable to a combination of morphological and physiological responses to flooding.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0107636PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4164644PMC
December 2015

[Haloxylon ammodendron community patterns in different habitats along southeastern edge of Zhunger basin].

Ying Yong Sheng Tai Xue Bao 2005 Jul;16(7):1224-9

Department of Protection, State Forestry Administration, Beijing 100043, China.

Low-lying land, slow and gentle desert, and semi-mobile dune are the three different habitats of natural Haloxylon ammodendron community along the southeastern edge of Zhunger Basin in Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region. This paper studied the structural characters of H. ammodendron community from the aspects of species structure, species diversity, biomass, and distribution patterns of natural regeneration sapling. The results showed that the species of H. ammodendron community was the richest on low-lying land, the second on slow and gentle desert, and the least on semi-mobile dune. The number of plant species in the three different habitats was 16, 15 and 12, respectively. The amount of H. ammodendron natural regeneration sapling was the largest (6 687 trees x hm(-2)) on semi-mobile dune, but its distribution was not even. Low-lying land had a slightly smaller amount (5 799 trees x hm(-2)) of H. ammodendron natural regeneration sapling than semi-mobile dune, but the distribution of the sapling was more even. The overall evaluation ion was that the natural regeneration of H. ammodendron community was the best on low-lying land. Its total biomass on low-lying land was 19.39 t x hm(-2), while that on slow and gentle desert and semi-mobile dune was 9.32 and 6.69 t x hm(-2), respectively. The distribution patterns of H. ammodendron natural regeneration sapling in different habitats were all aggregatice. The ground of low-lying land was fixed, with fairly good soil moisture and fertility, which was appropriate for the growth of H. ammodendron and the development of H. anmmodendron community, while that of slow and gentle desert and semi-mobile dune was easier to suffer from wind erosion, with poor soil moisture and fertility and fairly serious habitat conditions.
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July 2005

[Effects of gap in primitive subalpine fir forest on diversity of herb and shrub in Tibet].

Ying Yong Sheng Tai Xue Bao 2004 Feb;15(2):191-4

Tibet Agriculture and Animal Husbandry College, Li'nzhi 860000, China.

Effects of gap in primitive fir forest in southeast Tibet on species diversity of herb and shrub were studied. The results showed that species composition, distribution and diversity in gap were different from those in non-gap. The improvement of illumination and other habitat conditions resulted in richer species of herb and shrub in gap. There were shade-tolerant and photophilic herb species and shrub species in gap, however, only shade-tolerant herb species and shrub species grew in non-gap. Species diversity and evenness in gap were higher than in non-gap. The diminutive similar coefficient between herb and shrub communities showed that certain difference existed between herb and shrub communities in stands of gap and non-gap. The similar coefficients were little correlative between gap area and communities. Gap was important to improve growth of herb and shrub and maintain species diversity of primitive subalpine fir forest in southwest Tibet.
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February 2004

[Characteristics and disturbance status of gaps in subalpine fir forest in southeast Tibet].

Ying Yong Sheng Tai Xue Bao 2002 Jul;13(7):777-80

Institute of Tibet Plateau Ecology, Linzhi 860000.

Characteristics and disturbance status of gaps, including gap size, disturbance frequency, forming patterns of gaps, and quantity of the tree in gap, in subalpine fir forest in Southeast Tibet were studied. The results showed that expanded gaps accounted for 41.73% and canopy gaps accounted for 14.71% of land area in the forest. Averagely, 0.82% and 0.29% of forest area were transformed into expanded and canopy gaps every year. The velocity of gap forming was 0.31 ind.hm-2.yr-1. The disturbance cycle of gaps was 345 yr. Among 16 investigated gaps, there were 78 gap-markers in total, and there were averagely 4.88 trees in each gap. The main reasons of gap forming were gap-markers fallen as well as uprooted and withered, and their external force was strong wind. The possibility of gaps forming reached the maximum while the diameter of arbors was 40-60 cm and the high was 15-20 m in the main forest layer. Gaps were formed by many disturbances in different age in the subalpine fir forest in Southeast Tibet..
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July 2002
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