Publications by authors named "Quang Thai Pham"

5 Publications

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The first 100 days of SARS-CoV-2 control in Vietnam.

Clin Infect Dis 2020 Aug 1. Epub 2020 Aug 1.

Centre for Tropical Medicine and Global Health, Nuffield Department of Medicine, University of Oxford, UK.

Background: One hundred days after SARS-CoV-2 was first reported in Vietnam on January 23rd, 270 cases were confirmed, with no deaths. We describe the control measures used by the Government and their relationship with imported and domestically-acquired case numbers, with the aim of identifying the measures associated with successful SARS-CoV-2 control.

Methods: Clinical and demographic data on the first 270 SARS-CoV-2 infected cases and the timing and nature of Government control measures, including numbers of tests and quarantined individuals, were analysed. Apple and Google mobility data provided proxies for population movement. Serial intervals were calculated from 33 infector-infectee pairs and used to estimate the proportion of pre-symptomatic transmission events and time-varying reproduction numbers.

Results: A national lockdown was implemented between April 1st and 22nd. Around 200 000 people were quarantined and 266 122 RT-PCR tests conducted. Population mobility decreased progressively before lockdown. 60% (163/270) of cases were imported; 43% (89/208) of resolved infections remained asymptomatic for the duration of infection. The serial interval was 3·24 days, and 27·5% (95% confidence interval, 15·7%-40·0%) of transmissions occurred pre-symptomatically. Limited transmission amounted to a maximum reproduction number of 1·15 (95% confidence interval, 0·37-2·36). No community transmission has been detected since April 15th.

Conclusions: Vietnam has controlled SARS-CoV-2 spread through the early introduction of mass communication, meticulous contact-tracing with strict quarantine, and international travel restrictions. The value of these interventions is supported by the high proportion of asymptomatic and imported cases, and evidence for substantial pre-symptomatic transmission.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/cid/ciaa1130DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7454342PMC
August 2020

Sero-Prevalence Surveillance to Predict Vaccine-Preventable Disease Outbreaks; A Lesson from the 2014 Measles Epidemic in Northern Vietnam.

Open Forum Infect Dis 2019 Mar 24;6(3):ofz030. Epub 2019 Jan 24.

Oxford University Clinical Research Unit, Wellcome Trust Asia Programme, Hanoi, Vietnam.

Background: During the first half of 2014, a severe outbreak of measles occurred in northern Vietnam, causing 15 033 confirmed cases and 146 deaths.

Methods: To evaluate the population-level seroprevalence of protection against measles in the period before the outbreak, we made use of an existing age-stratified serum bank, collected over the year before the outbreak, between November 2012 and December 2013, from 4 sites across the country (Hanoi, Hue, Dak Lak, and Ho Chi Minh City). Data from the UNICEF's Multiple Indicator Clustered Surveys (MICS), carried out in Vietnam during the first quarter of 2014, were used to assess the vaccine coverage in 6 ecological regions of Vietnam.

Results: Results revealed a large discrepancy between levels of protection, as estimated from the serology and vaccine coverage estimated by UNICEF's MICS. Variation in seroprevalence across locations and age groups corresponded with reported numbers of measles cases, most of which were among the 0-2-year-old age group and in the northern part of the country.

Conclusions: Our study presents a strong case in favor of a serosurveillance sentinel network that could be used to proactively tune vaccination policies and other public health interventions.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ofid/ofz030DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6405937PMC
March 2019

Hot spot detection and spatio-temporal dispersion of dengue fever in Hanoi, Vietnam.

Glob Health Action 2013 Jan 24;6:18632. Epub 2013 Jan 24.

Institute of Training for Preventive Medicine and Public Health, Hanoi Medical University, Hanoi, Vietnam.

Introduction: Dengue fever (DF) in Vietnam remains a serious emerging arboviral disease, which generates significant concerns among international health authorities. Incidence rates of DF have increased significantly during the last few years in many provinces and cities, especially Hanoi. The purpose of this study was to detect DF hot spots and identify the disease dynamics dispersion of DF over the period between 2004 and 2009 in Hanoi, Vietnam.

Methods: Daily data on DF cases and population data for each postcode area of Hanoi between January 1998 and December 2009 were obtained from the Hanoi Center for Preventive Health and the General Statistic Office of Vietnam. Moran's I statistic was used to assess the spatial autocorrelation of reported DF. Spatial scan statistics and logistic regression were used to identify space-time clusters and dispersion of DF.

Results: The study revealed a clear trend of geographic expansion of DF transmission in Hanoi through the study periods (OR 1.17, 95% CI 1.02-1.34). The spatial scan statistics showed that 6/14 (42.9%) districts in Hanoi had significant cluster patterns, which lasted 29 days and were limited to a radius of 1,000 m. The study also demonstrated that most DF cases occurred between June and November, during which the rainfall and temperatures are highest.

Conclusions: There is evidence for the existence of statistically significant clusters of DF in Hanoi, and that the geographical distribution of DF has expanded over recent years. This finding provides a foundation for further investigation into the social and environmental factors responsible for changing disease patterns, and provides data to inform program planning for DF control.
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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3556563PMC
http://dx.doi.org/10.3402/gha.v6i0.18632DOI Listing
January 2013

H5N1-SeroDetect EIA and rapid test: a novel differential diagnostic assay for serodiagnosis of H5N1 infections and surveillance.

J Virol 2011 Dec 28;85(23):12455-63. Epub 2011 Sep 28.

Division of Viral Products, Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research, FDA, Bldg. 29B, Rm. 4NN02, 8800 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA.

Continuing evolution of highly pathogenic (HP) H5N1 influenza viruses in wild birds with transmission to domestic poultry and humans poses a pandemic threat. There is an urgent need for a simple and rapid serological diagnostic assay which can differentiate between antibodies to seasonal and H5N1 strains and that could provide surveillance tools not dependent on virus isolation and nucleic acid technologies. Here we describe the establishment of H5N1 SeroDetect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and rapid test assays based on three peptides in HA2 (488-516), PB1-F2 (2-75), and M2e (2-24) that are highly conserved within H5N1 strains. These peptides were identified by antibody repertoire analyses of H5N1 influenza survivors in Vietnam using whole-genome-fragment phage display libraries (GFPDLs). To date, both platforms have demonstrated high levels of sensitivity and specificity in detecting H5N1 infections (clade 1 and clade 2.3.4) in Vietnamese patients as early as 7 days and up to several years postinfection. H5N1 virus-uninfected individuals in Vietnam and the United States, including subjects vaccinated with seasonal influenza vaccines or with confirmed seasonal virus infections, did not react in the H5N1-SeroDetect assays. Moreover, sera from individuals vaccinated with H5N1 subunit vaccine with moderate anti-H5N1 neutralizing antibody titers did not react positively in the H5N1-SeroDetect ELISA or rapid test assays. The simple H5N1-SeroDetect ELISA and rapid tests could provide an important tool for large-scale surveillance for potential exposure to HP H5N1 strains in both humans and birds.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/JVI.06023-11DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3209361PMC
December 2011

Social contact patterns in Vietnam and implications for the control of infectious diseases.

PLoS One 2011 Feb 14;6(2):e16965. Epub 2011 Feb 14.

Oxford University Clinical Research Unit, Hanoi, Vietnam.

Background: The spread of infectious diseases from person to person is determined by the frequency and nature of contacts between infected and susceptible members of the population. Although there is a long history of using mathematical models to understand these transmission dynamics, there are still remarkably little empirical data on contact behaviors with which to parameterize these models. Even starker is the almost complete absence of data from developing countries. We sought to address this knowledge gap by conducting a household based social contact diary in rural Vietnam.

Methods And Findings: A diary based survey of social contact patterns was conducted in a household-structured community cohort in North Vietnam in 2007. We used generalized estimating equations to model the number of contacts while taking into account the household sampling design, and used weighting to balance the household size and age distribution towards the Vietnamese population. We recorded 6675 contacts from 865 participants in 264 different households and found that mixing patterns were assortative by age but were more homogenous than observed in a recent European study. We also observed that physical contacts were more concentrated in the home setting in Vietnam than in Europe but the overall level of physical contact was lower. A model of individual versus household vaccination strategies revealed no difference between strategies in the impact on R(0).

Conclusions And Significance: This work is the first to estimate contact patterns relevant to the spread of infections transmitted from person to person by non-sexual routes in a developing country setting. The results show interesting similarities and differences from European data and demonstrate the importance of context specific data.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0016965PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3038933PMC
February 2011