Publications by authors named "Qingwei Tan"

15 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Cytotoxic and non-cytotoxic cardiac glycosides isolated from the combined flowers, leaves, and twigs of Streblus asper.

Bioorg Med Chem 2020 02 7;28(4):115301. Epub 2020 Jan 7.

Division of Medicinal Chemistry and Pharmacognosy, College of Pharmacy, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210, United States. Electronic address:

A new non-cytotoxic [(+)-17β-hydroxystrebloside (1)] and two known cytotoxic [(+)-3'-de-O-methylkamaloside (2) and (+)-strebloside (3)] cardiac glycosides were isolated and identified from the combined flowers, leaves, and twigs of Streblus asper collected in Vietnam, with the absolute configuration of 1 established from analysis of its ECD and NMR spectroscopic data and confirmed by computational ECD calculations. A new 14,21-epoxycardanolide (3a) was synthesized from 3 that was treated with base. A preliminary structure-activity relationship study indicated that the C-14 hydroxy group and the C-17 lactone unit and the established conformation are important for the mediation of the cytotoxicity of 3. Molecular docking profiles showed that the cytotoxic 3 and its non-cytotoxic analogue 1 bind differentially to Na/K-ATPase. Compound 3 docks deeply in the Na/K-ATPase pocket with a sole pose, and its C-10 formyl and C-5, C-14, and C-4' hydroxy groups may form hydrogen bonds with the side-chains of Glu111, Glu117, Thr797, and Arg880 of Na/K-ATPase, respectively. However, 1 fits the cation binding sites with at least three different poses, which all depotentiate the binding between 1 and Na/K-ATPase. Thus, 3 was found to inhibit Na/K-ATPase, but 1 did not. In addition, the cytotoxic and Na/K-ATPase inhibitory 3 did not affect glucose uptake in human lung cancer cells, against which it showed potent activity, indicating that this cardiac glycoside mediates its cytotoxicity by targeting Na/K-ATPase but not by interacting with glucose transporters.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bmc.2019.115301DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7029422PMC
February 2020

Late-stage difluoromethylation leading to a self-immobilizing fluorogenic probe for the visualization of enzyme activities in live cells.

Chem Commun (Camb) 2019 Dec;55(99):15000-15003

State Key Laboratory of Bioreactor Engineering, Shanghai Key Laboratory of New Drug Design, School of Pharmacy, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237, China.

Reported herein is a novel p-quinone methide-based self-immobilizing fluorogenic probe for the visualization of β-galactosidase activities in live cells. This easily prepared imaging reagent massively increases the fluorescence intensity and covalently links to the activation site with high efficiency upon enzymatic trigger.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1039/c9cc07903cDOI Listing
December 2019

Two Early Cretaceous Fossils Document Transitional Stages in Alvarezsaurian Dinosaur Evolution.

Curr Biol 2018 09 23;28(17):2853-2860.e3. Epub 2018 Aug 23.

Long Hao Institute of Geology and Paleontology, Jia 29, Fengzhou Road, Hohhot, Nei Mongol 010010, China.

Highly specialized animals are often difficult to place phylogenetically. The Late Cretaceous members of Alvarezsauria represent such an example, having been posited as members of various theropod lineages, including birds [1-11]. A 70-million-year ghost lineage exists between them and the Late Jurassic putative alvarezsaurian Haplocheirus [12], which preserves so few derived features that its membership in Alvarezsauria has recently been questioned [13]. If Haplocheirus is indeed an alvarezsaurian, then the 70-million-year gap between Haplocheirus and other alvarezsaurians represents the longest temporal hiatus within the fossil record of any theropod subgroup [14]. Here we report two new alvarezsaurians from the Early Cretaceous of Western China that document successive, transitional stages in alvarezsaurian evolution. They provide further support for Haplocheirus as an alvarezsaurian and for alvarezsaurians as basal maniraptorans. Furthermore, they suggest that the early biogeographic history of the Alvarezsauria involved dispersals from Asia to other continents. The new specimens are temporally, morphologically, and functionally intermediate between Haplocheirus and other known alvarezsaurians and provide a striking example of the evolutionary transition from a typical theropod forelimb configuration (i.e., the relatively long arm and three-digit grasping hand of typical tetanuran form in early-branching alvarezsaurians) to a highly specialized one (i.e., the highly modified and shortened arm and one-digit digging hand of Late Cretaceous parvicursorines such as Linhenykus [1, 15]). Comprehensive analyses incorporating data from these new finds show that the specialized alvarezsaurian forelimb morphology evolved slowly and in a mosaic fashion during the Cretaceous.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cub.2018.07.057DOI Listing
September 2018

Functional anatomy of a giant toothless mandible from a bird-like dinosaur: Gigantoraptor and the evolution of the oviraptorosaurian jaw.

Sci Rep 2017 11 24;7(1):16247. Epub 2017 Nov 24.

Key Laboratory of Vertebrate Evolution and Human Origins of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100044, China.

The Oviraptorosauria are a group of theropod dinosaurs that diverged from the typical carnivorous theropod diet. It includes two main lineages - Caenagnathidae and Oviraptoridae - that display a number of differences in mandibular morphology, but little is known about their functional consequences, hampering our understanding of oviraptorosaurian dietary evolution. This study presents the first in-depth description of the giant toothless mandible of Gigantoraptor, the only well-preserved stemward caenagnathid mandible. This mandible shows the greatest relative beak depth among caenagnathids, which is an adaptation seen in some modern birds for processing harder seeds. The presence of a lingual triturating shelf in caenagnathids more crownward than Gigantoraptor suggests a possible increased specialization towards shearing along this lineage. Like other oviraptorosaurs, the possession of a dorsally convex articular glenoid in Gigantoraptor indicates that propalinal jaw movement was probably an important mechanism for food processing, as in Sphenodon and dicynodonts. Oviraptorid mandibles were more suited for producing powerful bites (e.g. crushing-related) compared to caenagnathids: oviraptorids generally possess a deeper, more downturned beak, a taller coronoid process prominence and a larger medial mandibular fossa. This disparity in caenagnathid and oviraptorid mandible morphology potentially suggests specialization towards two different feeding styles - shearing and crushing-related mechanisms respectively.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-017-15709-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5701234PMC
November 2017

Malignant pheochromocytoma in the anterior mediastinum with sternal invasion: a case report.

J Thorac Dis 2017 Mar;9(3):E202-E209

Department of Thoracic Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital of Dalian Medical University, Dalian 116011, China.

Pheochromocytomas are catecholamine-producing neuroendocrine tumors that usually occur in the adrenal medulla or sympathetic paraganglia. Anterior mediastinum involvement with pheochromocytoma is rare and may not present with typical symptoms. Its clinical manifestation may be unclear and a high index of suspicion is required for accurate diagnosis. We report a rare case of pheochromocytoma of the anterior mediastinum in a 51-year-old female. A painful hard mass on the sternum was the only clinical manifestation. Imageological examination indicated that there might be a malignant mass on the anterior mediastinum and thoracic wall. The patient accepted surgical curettage and thoracic wall reconstruction. Based on pathological results and WHO definition, the final diagnosis was malignant pheochromocytoma. After six months follow-up, the patient had no recurrence or any symptom. Malignant pheochromocytoma in the anterior mediastinum invading the sternum is rare. A local painful mass may be the only clinical manifestation without special laboratory results. Surgery remains as the first choice for these patients. For this rare case, 3D reconstruction by special software may be a good method to realize individualized treatment. The final decision of the diagnosis should be based on pathological results, past medical history and WHO definition. Long-term follow-up is necessary, while other suspicious lesions should also be given sufficient attention.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.21037/jtd.2017.02.71DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5394084PMC
March 2017

New cytotoxic trichothecene macrolide epimers from endophytic Myrothecium roridum IFB-E012.

J Antibiot (Tokyo) 2016 08 13;69(8):652-5. Epub 2016 Jul 13.

Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of North Carolina at Wilmington, Wilmington, NC, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/ja.2016.86DOI Listing
August 2016

The first dromaeosaurid (Dinosauria: Theropoda) from the Lower Cretaceous Bayan Gobi Formation of Nei Mongol, China.

PeerJ 2015 7;3:e1480. Epub 2015 Dec 7.

Key Laboratory of Vertebrate Evolution and Human Origins, Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology & Paleoanthropology, Chinese Academy of Sciences , Beijing , China.

The first dromaeosaurid theropod from the Lower Cretaceous Bayan Gobi Formation is identified based on an incompletely preserved partially-articulated left leg, increasing the known diversity of its understudied ecosystem. The leg belongs to specimen IVPP V22530 and includes a typical deinonychosaurian pedal phalanx II-2 with a distinct constriction between the enlarged proximal end and the distal condyle as well as a typical deinonychosaurian enlarged pedal phalanx II-3. It possesses a symmetric metatarsus and a slender and long MT V that together suggest it is a dromaeosaurid. Two anatomical traits suggest the leg is microraptorine-like, but a more precise taxonomic referral was not possible: metatarsals II, III and IV are closely appressed distally and the ventral margin of the medial ligament pit of phalanx II-2 is close to the centre of the rounded distal condyle. This taxonomic status invites future efforts to discover additional specimens at the study locality because-whether it is a microraptorine or a close relative-this animal is expected to make important contributions to our understanding of dromaeosaurid evolution and biology. IVPP V22530 also comprises of an isolated dromaeosaurid manual ungual, a proximal portion of a right theropod anterior dorsal rib and an indeterminate bone mass that includes a collection of ribs. Neither the rib fragment nor the bone mass can be confidently referred to Dromaeosauridae, although they may very well belong to the same individual to whom the left leg belongs.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.7717/peerj.1480DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4675113PMC
December 2015

Screening and identification of lung cancer metastasis-related genes by suppression subtractive hybridization.

Thorac Cancer 2012 Aug;3(3):207-216

The Key Laboratory of Lung Cancer Molecular Biology in Sichuan Province, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan Province, ChinaTianjin Key Laboratory of Lung Cancer Metastasis and Tumor Microenvironment, Tianjin Lung Cancer Institute, Tianjin Medical University General Hospital, Tianjin, ChinaDepartment of Thoracic Surgery, First Affiliated Hospital, Dalian Medical University, Dalian, ChinaDepartment of Respiratory Medicine, the Second Hospital Affiliated to Dalian Medical University, Dalian, ChinaSoochow University Laboratory of Cancer Molecular Genetics, Medical College of Soochow University, Sino-Singapore Industrial Park, Suzhou, China.

Background And Objective:   Lung cancer metastasis is a complicated process in which multiple stages and multiple genes are involved. There is an urgent need to use new molecular biology techniques to get more systematic information and have a general idea of the molecular events that take place in lung cancer metastasis. The object of this study was to construct the subtracted cDNA libraries of different metastatic potential lung cancer cell lines, NL9980 and L9981, which were established and screened from human lung large cell carcinoma cell line, WCQH-9801.

Method:   The forward and reverse subtracted cDNA libraries were constructed in the large cell lung cancer cell lines NL9980 and L9981 with the same heredity background but different metastatic potential, by suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH). The positive clones were preliminarily screened by blue-white colony and precisely identified by PCR. The forward and reverse subtracted libraries were screened and identified by dot blot so as to obtain the clones corresponding to gene segments with differential expression. DNA sequencing was performed to analyze the sequences of differential expression segments, which were then searched and compared using the Basic Local Alignment Search Tool from The National Center for Biotechnology Information NCBI BLAST tools. Quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and western blotting were performed to confirm the differential expressed genes both on RNA and protein levels.

Results:   The forward and reverse subtracted cDNA libraries of the different large cell lung cancer cell lines with metastatic potential were successfully constructed. With blue-white colony and dot blot, 307 positive clones in the forward subtracted library and 78 positive clones in the reverse subtracted library were obtained. Fifty-five clones were successfully sequenced in the forward subtracted library while 31 clones were successfully sequenced in the reverse subtracted library. One new expressed sequence tag (EST) segment was identified from the reverse subtracted cDNA library and was successfully submitted to GenBank and embodied by GenBank. For the differentially expressed genes between L9981 and NL9980 screened by SSH, four genes, ANXA2, KRT18, ACTG1 was upregulated in L9981 cells compared to NL9980 cells. Annexin A2 (which was encoded by ANXA2), γ-actin (which was encoded by ACTG1), and aldose reductase (which was encoded by AKR1B1) proteins were upregulated in L9981 cells compared to NL9980 cells by western blotting.

Conclusion:   The forward and reverse subtracted cDNA libraries of different metastatic potential large cell lung cancer cell lines were successfully constructed by SSH. A series of genes have been screened out to have significantly different expression levels between lung cancer cell lines NL9980 and L9981. A new EST segment that may represent a new metastasis-related gene has been identified. Consistent with the result of SSH, both quantitative real-time RT-PCR and western Blotting confirmed the upregulation of ANXA2, ACTG1 and AKR1B1 in lung cancer cell line L9981 compared with NL9980. These three genes may play important roles in lung cancer metastasis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1759-7714.2011.00092.xDOI Listing
August 2012

A proteomic approach to elucidate the multiple targets of selenium-induced cell-growth inhibition in human lung cancer.

Thorac Cancer 2011 Nov;2(4):164-178

The Key Laboratory of Lung Cancer Molecular Biology in Sichuan Province, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Sichuan, ChinaTianjin Key Laboratory of Lung Cancer Metastasis and Tumor Microenvironment, Tianjin Lung Cancer Institute, Tianjin Medical University General Hospital, Tianjin, ChinaGraduate Program of Pharmacology and Toxicology and Cancer Center, University of California at Davis, Sacramento, California, USADepartment of Thoracic Surgery, First Affiliated Hospital, Dalian Medical University, Dalian, ChinaDepartment of Respiratory Medicine, the Second Hospital affiliated to Dalian Medical University, Dalian, China.

Background:   Methylseleninic acid (MSA) has been implicated as a promising anticancer agent for lung cancer. However, the underlying molecular mechanism(s) responsible for MSA's action is not well understood. Our study aimed to examine the cellular effects of MSA on L9981 human high-metastatic large cell lung cancer cells and gain insights into its possible molecular mechanism(s) through a proteomic approach.

Methods:   L9981 cells were exposed to MSA at different concentrations and time points. The effects of MSA on cell proliferation and apoptosis were detected by cell viability analyzer Vi-CELL and flow cytometric analysis, respectively. We analyzed the alterations in the proteome profile of L9981 cells induced by MSA using the 2-D difference in gel electrophoresis (2-D DIGE) and identified the differentially expressed proteins using a liquid chromatography system followed by tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS).

Results:   We found that MSA inhibited cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner and significantly induced early apoptosis in L9981 cells. 2-D DIGE showed that MSA induced significant changes (>1.29 fold) in the expression levels of 42 protein spots compared to the untreated control (P < 0.05). As identified by LC-MS/MS, proteins that underwent changes in response to MSA were related to various biological functions, including: (i) endoplasmic reticulum stress (upregulation of molecular chaperones like heat shock protein A5, protein disulfide-isomerase precursor, and calreticulin precursor); (ii) oxidative stress response/ thioredoxin system (decreased thioredoxin-like protein 1 and increased thioredoxin reductase 1); (iii) translation regulation (downregulation of translation factors like elongation factor 1-beta and eukaryotic translation initiation factor 6); (iv) mitochondrial bioenergetic function (upregulation of adenosine triphosphate synthase subunit beta and mitochondria); and (v) cell signal transduction regulation (decreased peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase A and 14-3-3 protein gamma). The protein and gene expression levels of those proteins of interest were further confirmed by Western blot and/or real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction.

Conclusion:   Our results suggest that MSA may inhibit cell proliferation and induce apoptosis in lung cancer by modulating multiple targets involved in various crucial cellular processes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1759-7714.2011.00066.xDOI Listing
November 2011

A short-armed troodontid dinosaur from the Upper Cretaceous of Inner Mongolia and its implications for troodontid evolution.

PLoS One 2011 7;6(9):e22916. Epub 2011 Sep 7.

Key Laboratory of Evolutionary Systematics of Vertebrates, Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.

Background: The Troodontidae represents one of the most bird-like theropod groups and plays an important role in our understanding of avian origins. Although troodontids have been known for over 150 years, few known derived troodontid specimens preserve significant portions of both the forelimb and the hindlimb.

Methodology/principal Findings: Here, we report a new troodontid taxon, Linhevenator tani gen. et sp. nov., based on a partial, semi-articulated skeleton recovered from the Upper Cretaceous Wulansuhai Formation of Wulatehouqi, Inner Mongolia, China. L. tani has an unusual combination of primitive and derived character states, though our phylogenetic analysis places it in a derived clade within the Troodontidae. As a derived taxon, L. tani has a dromaeosaurid-like pedal digit II, and this species also possesses a humerus that is proportionally much shorter and more robust than those of most other troodontids.

Conclusion/significance: The combination of features present in Linhevenator indicates a complex pattern of character evolution within the Troodontidae. In particular, the discovery of Linhevenator suggests that derived troodontids have independently evolved a highly specialized pedal digit II and have significantly shortened the forelimb over the course of their evolution.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0022916PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3168428PMC
February 2012

[Experiences of cardiopulmonary bypass in the treatment of locally advanced pulmonary malignant tumors].

Zhongguo Fei Ai Za Zhi 2011 Mar;14(3):275-7

Department of Anesthesiology, the First Affiliated Hospital of Dalian Medical University, Dalian, China.

Background And Objective: Cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) in the treatment of locally advanced pulmonary malignant tumors invaded heart or great vessels was not well underwent. The aim of this study is to report the results of these cases with locally advanced pulmonary malignant tumor which were completely resected under CPB in our hospital.

Methods: Four patients with locally advanced pulmonary malignant tumors were operated under CPB. All patients had stage IIIb disease (T4N0M0). Moderate hypothermia CPB was used for all 4 cases. The CPB time was 79 min-155 min and aortic cross-clamp time was 57 min-126 min, respectively.

Results: There was no operative death in this series. CPB was smooth, and heart automatically rebeated in the 4 patients. All the 4 patients were discharged in 3 weeks. One patient dead of heart failure at 13 months after operation, one case dead of distant tumor metastasis at 22 months after operation. The other two patients have survived over 25 months and 11 months, respectively.

Conclusions: CPB is helpful for completely removal of locally advanced pulmonary malignant tumors.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3779/j.issn.1009-3419.2011.03.14DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5999663PMC
March 2011

A monodactyl nonavian dinosaur and the complex evolution of the alvarezsauroid hand.

Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 2011 Feb 24;108(6):2338-42. Epub 2011 Jan 24.

Key Laboratory of Evolutionary Systematics of Vertebrates, Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100044, China.

Digital reduction is a striking evolutionary phenomenon that is clearly exemplified in theropod dinosaurs by the functionally didactyl manus of tyrannosaurids, the flight-adapted manus of birds (Aves), and the tridactyl but digit II-dominated manus of alvarezsauroids. The enlargement of manual digit II in alvarezsauroids and the concurrent reduction of the lateral digits have been interpreted as adaptations for digging, although no detailed biomechanical analysis of hand function has so far been carried out for this group. In the derived alvarezsauroid clade Parvicursorinae, the lateral digits are so small as to be presumably vestigial. Here we report a new alvarezsauroid, Linhenykus monodactylus gen. et sp. nov., based on a specimen from the Upper Cretaceous Wulansuhai Formation of Inner Mongolia, China. Cladistic analysis identifies Linhenykus as the most basal parvicursorine, and digit II of the manus retains a slender morphology and other primitive features. However, Linhenykus is also highly apomorphic in exhibiting the most extreme reduction of the lateral manual digits seen in any alvarezsauroid. Phalanges are retained only on the most medial digit (digit II), making Linhenykus the only known functionally monodactyl nonavian dinosaur. Other parvicursorines are more primitive in retaining a tridactyl manus but more derived in that digit II is highly robust and shows other apomorphic features in both of its phalanges. The unexpected combination of features seen in the hand of Linhenykus points to a complex mosaic pattern of manual evolution in alvarezsauroids, with loss of the presumably vestigial outer digits being decoupled from change in the form of digit II.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1011052108DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3038769PMC
February 2011

[A case report of congenital bronchobiliary fistula in adults].

Zhongguo Fei Ai Za Zhi 2010 Jan;13(1):87-8

Department of Thoracic Cardiovascular Surgery, the First Affiliated Hospital of Dalian Medical University, Dalian 116011, China.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3779/j.issn.1009-3419.2010.01.18DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6000675PMC
January 2010

A gigantic bird-like dinosaur from the Late Cretaceous of China.

Nature 2007 Jun;447(7146):844-7

Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100044, China.

An evolutionary trend of decreasing size is present along the line to birds in coelurosaurian theropod evolution, but size increases are seen in many coelurosaurian subgroups, in which large forms are less bird-like. Here we report on a new non-avian dinosaur, Gigantoraptor erlianensis, gen. et sp. nov., from the Late Cretaceous Iren Dabasu Formation of Nei Mongol, China. Although it has a body mass of about 1,400 kg, a phylogenetic analysis positions this new taxon within the Oviraptorosauria, a group of small, feathered theropods rarely exceeding 40 kg in body mass. A histological analysis suggests that Gigantoraptor gained this size by a growth rate considerably faster than large North American tyrannosaurs such as Albertosaurus and Gorgosaurus. Gigantoraptor possesses several salient features previously unknown in any other dinosaur and its hind limb bone scaling and proportions are significantly different from those of other coelurosaurs, thus increasing the morphological diversity among dinosaurs. Most significantly, the gigantic Gigantoraptor shows many bird-like features absent in its smaller oviraptorosaurian relatives, unlike the evolutionary trend seen in many other coelurosaurian subgroups.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nature05849DOI Listing
June 2007

[The relationship among CT appearances and dynamic enhancement and microvessel density of peripheral lung cancer].

Zhongguo Fei Ai Za Zhi 2003 Feb;6(1):30-4

Department of Radiology, First Hospital, Dalian Medical University, Dalian, Liaoning 116011, P.R.China.

Background: To investigate the relationship among the CT appearances, the dynamic CT enhancement and the microvessel density (MVD) of peripheral lung cancer.

Methods: Thirty-three patients with peripheral lung cancer proved by surgery and pathology underwent enhancement dynamic CT scan before operation, including 14 squamous cell carcinoma and 19 adenocarcinoma. The MVD was measured in resected tumor specimens with immunohistochemical method of LSAB.

Results: The MVD value of adenocarcinoma was significantly higher than that of squamous cell carcinoma (63.4±11.9 versus 50.2±16.3, P < 0.05). The MVD values were higher in junction zone and interstitial areas than those in parenchymal areas, necrotic zones and scar areas of tumors. There were significant relationships among the MVD value and diameter of tumor, lobulation sign, vessel convergence sign, pleural retraction sign and lymph node metastasis (P < 0.05 ). The mean enhanced CT values was (43.4±11.8) HU in adenocarcinomas, and (34.6±10.7) HU in squamous cell carcinomas (P < 0.05). The CT values of both adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma had positive correlations to their corresponding MVD values (r=0.719, P < 0.01;r=0.819, P < 0.01).

Conclusions: The CT appearances and the enhanced CT values of peripheral lung carcinomas are closely related to their MVD values, which might be an indicator to identify the histological classification and to predict the malignant degree of tumor.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3779/j.issn.1009-3419.2003.01.08DOI Listing
February 2003