Dr. Qinghuang Tang, PhD - Tulane University - Postdoctoral Fellow

Dr. Qinghuang Tang

PhD

Tulane University

Postdoctoral Fellow

New Orleans, LA

Main Specialties: Biology, Biotechnology

ORCID logohttps://orcid.org/0000-0002-9436-8628


Top Author

Dr. Qinghuang Tang, PhD - Tulane University - Postdoctoral Fellow

Dr. Qinghuang Tang

PhD

Introduction

I am fully committed to establishing a life-long career in developmental biology. As a Postdoctoral Fellow working in the Department of Cell & Molecular Biology at Tulane University, USA, I am a sophisticated researcher in craniofacial development. I am bursting with scientific aspirations for studying craniofacial development in depth and eager to start my research as soon as possible.

Primary Affiliation: Tulane University - New Orleans, LA

Specialties:


View Dr. Qinghuang Tang’s Resume / CV

Education

Aug 2015
Yonsei University College of Dentistry, Seoul, Korea
Doctor of Philosophy
Applied Life Science
Jul 2007
Fujian Normal University, Fuzhou, Fujian, China
Master of Science
Developmental Biology
Jul 2004
Fujian Normal University, Fuzhou, Fujian, China
Bachelor of Science
Biology

Experience

Feb 2017
Atypical BMP4 pathway in tooth development
Postdoctoral Fellow
Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Tulane University, New Orleans, LA, U.S.A.
Feb 2015
Bone development in IFITM5-deficient mice
Graduate Student Researcher
Department of Oral Biology Yonsei University College of Dentistry, Seoul, Korea
Feb 2014
Role of YAP in wound healing
Graduate Student Researcher
Department of Oral Biology Yonsei University College of Dentistry, Seoul, Korea
Feb 2013
Spatially restricted patterns of cell crowding control palatal shelf elevation: Role of YAP in palatal shelf elevation
Graduate Student Researcher
Department of Oral Biology Yonsei University College of Dentistry, Seoul, Korea
Aug 2012
Role of Rac1 and RhoA in palate development and pathogenesis
Graduate Student Researcher
Department of Oral Biology Yonsei University College of Dentistry, Seoul, Korea
Sep 2011
Transient receptor potential M3(TRPM3) in osteoblast-like cells
Graduate Student Researcher
Department of Oral Biology Yonsei University College of Dentistry, Seoul, Korea
Feb 2011
Ca2 oscillation in ST2 mesenchymal progenitor cells
Graduate Student Researcher
Department of Oral Biology Yonsei University College of Dentistry, Seoul, Korea

Publications

10Publications

192Reads

24Profile Views

4PubMed Central Citations

An Explanation for How FGFs Predict Species-Specific Tooth Cusp Patterns.

J Dent Res 2018 07 28;97(7):828-834. Epub 2018 Feb 28.

1 Division in Anatomy and Developmental Biology, Department of Oral Biology, Oral Science Research Center, BK21 PLUS Project, Yonsei University College of Dentistry, Seoul, Republic of Korea.

Species-specific cusp patterns result from the iterative formation of enamel knots, the epithelial signaling centers, at the future cusp positions. The expressions of fibroblast growth factors (FGFs), especially Fgf4, in the secondary enamel knots in the areas of the future cusp tips are generally used to manifest the appearance of species-specific tooth shapes. However, the mechanism underlying the predictive role of FGFs in species-specific cusp patterns remains obscure. Here, we demonstrated that gerbils, which have a lophodont pattern, exhibit a striped expression pattern of Fgf4, whereas mice, which have a bunodont pattern, have a spotted expression pattern, and these observations verify the predictive role of Fgf4 in species-specific cusp patterns. By manipulating FGFs' signaling in the inner dental epithelium of gerbils, we provide evidence for the intracellular participation of FGF signaling, specifically FGF4 and FGF20, in Rac1- and RhoA-regulated cellular geometry remolding during the determination of different cusp patterns. Our study presents a novel explanation of how different FGF expression patterns produce different cusp patterns and implies that a conserved intracellular FGF-GTPase signaling module might represent an underlying developmental basis for evolutionary changes in cusp patterns.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0022034518759625DOI Listing
July 2018
68 Reads
5.125 Impact Factor

Comparative gene expression profiles of dental follicle at different stages of periodontal development: Combined use of laser capture microdissection and microarray

Journal of Oral Bioscience 60 (2018)92-97

Journal of Oral Biosciences

Objectives:

Odontogenesis is dependent on serial temporal and spatial epithelial-mesenchymal interaction. Multiple signaling networks have been identified in the inductive interactions of odontogenesis at the early stage. Technical obstacles and heterogeneity of the dental follicle (DF), which is the origin of the majority of periodontal tissues, have hindered the clarification of the molecular blueprint in early periodontal tissue development. This has in turn hindered studies of new/effective periodontal regeneration therapy. In this study, we comparatively analyzed the gene expression profiles of DF at E17 (when DF cells are histologically recognized) and PN2 (the initiation of periodontal development).

Methods:

Gene expression profiles of DF at E17 and PN2 were assessed by the combined use of laser capture microdissection and microarray.

Results: Comparative gene expression analysis of DF at E17 and PN2 during periodontal development revealed > 2-fold up-regulation and down-regulation of 2519 and 5060 genes, respectively. Bioinformatic analysis of the selected genes revealed that the temporally changed genes were mostly enriched in GO terms relative to the vasculature system, and were sometimes linked to multiple processes. RT-qPCR was used to verify the microarray data.

Conclusions:

The delineation of the differential gene expressions between pre- and post-natal developmental stages of DF in vivo will increase the understanding of periodontal tissue development.

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February 2018

Fine tuning of Rac1 and RhoA alters cuspal shapes by remolding the cellular geometry.

Sci Rep 2016 11 28;6:37828. Epub 2016 Nov 28.

Division in Anatomy and Developmental Biology, Department of Oral Biology, Oral Science Research Center, BK21 PLUS Project, Yonsei University College of Dentistry, Seoul, Korea.

The anatomic and functional combinations of cusps and lophs (ridges) define the tooth shape of rodent molars, which distinguishes species. The species-specific cusp patterns result from the spatiotemporal induction of enamel knots (EKs), which require precisely controlled cellular behavior to control the epithelial invagination. Despite the well-defined roles of EK in cusp patterning, the determinants of the ultimate cuspal shapes and involvement of epithelial cellular geometry are unknown. Using two typical tooth patterns, the lophodont in gerbils and the bunodont in mice, we showed that the cuspal shape is determined by the dental epithelium at the cap stage, whereas the cellular geometry in the inner dental epithelium (IDE) is correlated with the cuspal shape. Intriguingly, fine tuning Rac1 and RhoA interconvert cuspal shapes between two species by remolding the cellular geometry. Either inhibition of Rac1 or ectopic expression of RhoA could region-distinctively change the columnar shape of IDE cells in gerbils to drive invagination to produce cusps. Conversely, RhoA reduction in mice inhibited invagination and developed lophs. Furthermore, we found that Rac1 and RhoA modulate the choices of cuspal shape by coordinating adhesion junctions, actin distribution, and fibronectin localization to drive IDE invagination.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/srep37828DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5124948PMC
November 2016
14 Reads
5.078 Impact Factor

The Grooved Rodent Incisor Recapitulates Rudimentary Teeth Characteristics of Ancestral Mammals.

Authors:
L Li Q Tang H-S Jung

J Dent Res 2016 07 24;95(8):923-30. Epub 2016 Feb 24.

Division in Anatomy and Developmental Biology, Department of Oral Biology, Oral Science Research Center, BK21 PLUS Project, Yonsei University College of Dentistry, Seoul, Korea Oral Biosciences, Faculty of Dentistry, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR

It is known from the paleontology studies of eutherian mammals that incisor numbers were reduced during evolution. The evolutionary lost incisors may remain as vestigial structures at embryonic stages. The recapitulation of the incisor patterns among mammalian species will potentially uncover the mechanisms underlying the phenotypic transition of incisors during evolution. Here, we showed that a minute tooth formed in the presumptive groove region of the gerbil upper incisor at the early developmental stages, during which multiple epithelial swellings and Shh transcription domains spatiotemporally appeared in the dental epithelium, suggests the existence of vestigial dental primordia. Interestingly, when we trimmed the surrounding mesenchyme from incisor tooth germs at or before the bud stage prior to ex vivo culture, the explants developed different incisor phenotypes ranging from triplicated incisors, duplicated incisors, to Lagomorpha-like incisors, corresponding to the incisor patterns in the eutherian mammals. These results imply that the phenotypic transition of incisors during evolution, as well as the achievement of ultimate incisors in adults, arose from differential integrations of primordia. However, when the incisor tooth germ was trimmed at the cap stage, a grooved incisor developed similar to the normal condition. Furthermore, the incisor tooth germ developed a small but smooth incisor after the additional removal of the minute tooth and a lateral rudiment. These results suggest that multiple dental primordia integrated before the cap stage, with the labial primordia contributing to the labial face of the functional incisor. The minute tooth that occupied the boundary of the 2 labial primordia might be implicated in the groove formation. This study sheds light on how rudiments incorporate into functional organs and aids the understanding of incisor evolution.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0022034516633153DOI Listing
July 2016
5 Reads
5.125 Impact Factor

Novel insights into a retinoic-acid-induced cleft palate based on Rac1 regulation of the fibronectin arrangement.

Cell Tissue Res 2016 Mar 2;363(3):713-22. Epub 2015 Sep 2.

Division in Anatomy and Developmental Biology, Department of Oral Biology, Oral Science Research Center, BK21 PLUS Project, Yonsei University College of Dentistry, Seoul, Korea.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00441-015-2271-zDOI Listing
March 2016
17 Reads
3.565 Impact Factor

A contrasting function for miR-137 in embryonic mammogenesis and adult breast carcinogenesis.

Oncotarget 2015 Sep;6(26):22048-59

Division in Anatomy and Developmental Biology, Department of Oral Biology, Oral Science Research Center, BK21 PLUS Project, Yonsei University College of Dentistry, Seoul, Korea.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.18632/oncotarget.4218DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4673145PMC
September 2015
33 Reads
2 Citations
6.360 Impact Factor

Role of region-distinctive expression of Rac1 in regulating fibronectin arrangement during palatal shelf elevation.

Cell Tissue Res 2015 Sep 7;361(3):857-68. Epub 2015 Apr 7.

Division in Anatomy and Developmental Biology, Department of Oral Biology, Oral Science Research Center, BK21 PLUS Project, Yonsei University College of Dentistry, Seoul, South Korea.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00441-015-2169-9DOI Listing
September 2015
30 Reads
2 Citations
3.565 Impact Factor

Morphological and molecular changes associated with Pitchfork during mouse palate development.

Cell Tissue Res 2014 Nov 31;358(2):385-93. Epub 2014 Jul 31.

Department of Orthodontics, Yonsei University College of Dentistry, 50 Yonsei-Ro,, Seodaemun-Gu,, Seoul,, 120-752, Korea.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00441-014-1950-5DOI Listing
November 2014
25 Reads
3.565 Impact Factor

Regrowing a tooth: in vitro and in vivo approaches

Current Opinion in Cell Biology 2019, 61:126–131.

Current Opinion in Cell Biology

Biologically oriented regenerative dentistry in an attempt to regrow a functional tooth by harnessing the natural healing capabilities of dental tissues has become a recent trend challenging the current dental practice on repairing the damaged or missing tooth. In this review, we outline the conceptual development on the in situ revitalization of the tooth replacement capability lost during evolution, the updated progress in stem-cell-based in vivo repair of the damaged tooth, and the recent endeavors for in vitro generation of an implantable bioengineered tooth germ. Thereafter, we summarize the major challenges that need to be overcome in order to provide the rationale and directions for the success of fully functional tooth regeneration in the near future.

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November 0001

Impact Factor 8.233

10 Reads

Nkx2-5 defines a subpopulation of pacemaker cells and is essential for the physiological function of the sinoatrial node in mice

Development 2019 146: dev178145 doi: 10.1242/dev.178145

Development

The sinoatrial node (SAN), the primary cardiac pacemaker, consists of a head domain and a junction/tail domain that exhibit different functional properties. However, the underlying molecular mechanism defining these two pacemaker domains remains elusive. Nkx2-5 is a key transcription factor essential for the formation of the working myocardium, but it was generally thought to be detrimental to SAN development. However, Nkx2-5 is expressed in the developing SAN junction, suggesting a role for Nkx2-5 in SAN junction development and function. In this study, we present unambiguous evidence that SAN junction cells exhibit unique action potential configurations intermediate to those manifested by the SAN head and the surrounding atrial cells, suggesting a specific role for the junction cells in impulse generation and in SAN-atrial exit conduction. Single-cell RNA-seq analyses support this concept. Although Nkx2-5 inactivation in the SAN junction did not cause a malformed SAN at birth, the mutant mice manifested sinus node dysfunction. Thus, Nkx2-5 defines a population of pacemaker cells in the transitional zone. Despite Nkx2-5 being dispensable for SAN morphogenesis during embryogenesis, its deletion hampers atrial activation by the pacemaker.

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November 0001

Impact Factor 5.763

8 Reads

Top co-authors

Han-Sung Jung
Han-Sung Jung

Yonsei University

5
Liwen Li
Liwen Li

Shandong University

4
Min-Jung Lee
Min-Jung Lee

National Cancer Institute

2
Chengri Jin
Chengri Jin

Yonsei University College of Dentistry

2
L Li
L Li

Guangzhou General Hospital of Guangzhou Military Command

2
Kye-Seong Kim
Kye-Seong Kim

College of Medicine

1
Eun-Jung Kim
Eun-Jung Kim

Yonsei University

1
Cheryll Tickle
Cheryll Tickle

University of Dundee

1