Publications by authors named "Qiao Mou"

5 Publications

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Melatonin mitigates Chloroquine-induced defects in porcine immature Sertoli cells.

Theriogenology 2022 Jan 8;177:1-10. Epub 2021 Oct 8.

College of Animal Science and Technology, Northeast Agricultural University, Harbin, 150030, Heilongjiang, China; College of Animal Science, Yangtze University, Jingzhou, 434025, Hubei, China. Electronic address:

Chloroquine (CQ) could function as a lysosomotropic agent to inhibit the endolysosomal trafficking in the autophagy pathway, and is widely used on malarial, tumor and recently COVID-19. However, the effect of CQ treatment on porcine immature Sertoli cells (iSCs) remains unclear. Here we showed that CQ could reduce iSC viability in a dose-dependent manner. CQ treatment (20 μM) on iSCs for 36h could elevate oxidative stress, damage mitochondrial function and promote apoptosis, which could be partially rescued by melatonin (MT) (10 nM). Transcriptome profiling identified 1611 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) (776 up- and 835 down-regulated) (20 μM CQ vs. DMSO), mainly involved in MAPK cascade, cell proliferation/apoptosis, HIF-1, PI3K-Akt and lysosome signaling pathways. In contrast, only 467 (224 up- and 243 down-regulated) DEGs (CQ + MT vs. DMSO) could be found after MT (10 nM) addition, enriched in cell cycle, regulation of apoptotic process, lysosome and reproduction pathways. Therefore, the partial rescue effects of MT on CQ treatment were confirmed by multiple assays (cell viability, ROS level, mitochondrial function, apoptosis, and mRNA levels of selected genes). Collectively, CQ treatment could impair porcine iSC viability by deranging the signaling pathways related to apoptosis and autophagy, which could be partially rescued by MT supplementation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.theriogenology.2021.10.005DOI Listing
January 2022

Global 3'-untranslated region landscape mediated by alternative polyadenylation during meiotic maturation of pig oocytes.

Reprod Domest Anim 2021 Oct 13. Epub 2021 Oct 13.

College of Animal Science, Yangtze University, Jingzhou, China.

Alternative polyadenylation affects the length and composition of 3'-untranslated region (3'-UTR) and regulates mRNA stability or translational activity to affect important biological processes. However, global 3'-UTR landscape and its relationship with gamete maturation remain less studied. Here, we analysed our previously reported single-cell RNA-seq data of germinal vesicle and metaphase II stage oocytes in pigs to systematically catalogue the 3'-UTR dynamics during oocyte maturation. Two softwares (DaPars and APAtrap) were employed and identified 110 and 228 mRNAs with significantly different 3'-UTRs (adjusted p ≤ .05), respectively. Gene enrichment analyses found signalling pathways related with biological processes of female gametophyte production, methyltransferase activity and mRNA surveillance (DaPars) and cell cycle process, regulation of ERK1 and ERK2 cascade, regulation of translation, spindle organization, kinetochore, condensed chromosome and progesterone-mediated oocyte maturation (APAtrap), respectively. Moreover, 18 of 110 mRNAs (|△PDUI| ≥ 0.25 and |log PDUI ratio| ≥ 0.59) and 15 of 228 mRNAs (Perc. diff. ≥ 0.5) were with greater difference of 3'-UTR length or abundance, and integrative genomics viewer analysis further identified 4 (Alg10, Hadhb, Hsd17b4 and Sbds) of 18 mRNAs to be with 3'-UTR length differed ≥150 bp and 6 (Gcc1, Hnrnpa2b1, Lsm6, Prpf18, Sfr1 and Ust) of 15 mRNAs to be with 3'-UTR abundance extremely differed. Furthermore, the location, sequences and number of cis-elements were predicted, which were shown to derange cytoplasmic polyadenylation element, poly(A) site and microRNA binding sites within 3'-UTRs of Alg10, Hadhb, Hsd17b4 and Sbds mRNAs. Taken together, global 3'-UTR landscape changes dynamically with oocyte meiotic maturation, potentially involved in regulating oocyte meiotic process in pigs.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/rda.14026DOI Listing
October 2021

Acute heat stress reduces viability but increases lactate secretion of porcine immature Sertoli cells through transcriptome reprogramming.

Theriogenology 2021 Oct 9;173:183-192. Epub 2021 Aug 9.

College of Animal Science, Yangtze University, Jingzhou, 434025, Hubei, China. Electronic address:

Sertoli cells, important constituents of the somatic niche, supports the growth and development of spermatogonia. Heat stress (HS), among multiple intrinsic and external factors, can induce physiological and biochemical changes in Sertoli cells. However, the underlying molecular mechanism remains largely unclear. Here, we showed that acute heat stress (43 °C, 0.5 h) could reduce cell viability, promote apoptosis, and increase the lactate production of porcine immature Sertoli cells (iSCs) cultured in vitro. Then, transcriptome sequencing identified 126 immediately and 3372 prolonged responded differentially expressed genes (DEGs) after acute heat stress (43 °C, 0.5 h) (HS0.5), and 36 h recovery culture following heat stress (HS0.5-R36), respectively. Enrichment analyses found different signaling pathways: immediate changes including cell response to heat, regulation of cellular response to stress, heat shock protein binding, chaperon-mediated protein folding, and sterol biosynthetic process, but prolonged changes mainly involving cell cycle, regulation of apoptotic process/cell proliferation, reproductive process, P53, PI3K-Akt and Glycolysis/Gluconeogenesis. Furthermore, transcriptional patterns of 9 DEGs (Dnajb1, Traf6, Insig1, Gadd45g, Hdac6, Fkbp4, Serpine1, Pfkp and Galm), and 6 heat shock proteins (HSPs) (Hspa6, Hspb1, Hspd1, HSP90aa1, HSP90ab1 and Hsph1) were validated, as well as the protein pattern of HSP90AA1 via immunostaining and western blot. Taken together, heat stress could initiate immediate changes of heat shock-related genes, and reprogram transcriptome and signaling pathways affecting the viability, apoptosis and metabolite production of pig iSCs.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.theriogenology.2021.06.024DOI Listing
October 2021

CoQ10 improves meiotic maturation of pig oocytes through enhancing mitochondrial function and suppressing oxidative stress.

Theriogenology 2021 Jan 9;159:77-86. Epub 2020 Oct 9.

College of Animal Science, Yangtze University, Jingzhou, 434025, Hubei, China. Electronic address:

Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) is essential to many fundamental biological processes. However, the effect of CoQ10 on meiotic maturation of pig oocytes still remains elusive. In the present study we aimed to understand the effects of CoQ10 on porcine oocyte maturation, by supplementing different concentrations of CoQ10 (25, 50 and 100 μM) into the maturation medium. We showed that CoQ10 at 50 μM had better capacity to promote the nuclear maturation of pig oocytes derived from both small and large antral follicles. Though the cleavage and blastocyst rates of parthenotes stayed stable, 50 μM CoQ10 treatment could accelerate the development of parthenotes to blastocyst stage, and increase the average cell number of blastocyst. For cumulus-oocyte complexes from large antral follicles categorized by the brilliant cresyl blue (BCB) test, 50 μM CoQ10 treatment could specifically promote the nuclear maturation of poor-quality oocytes in the BCB-negative group. Mitochondrial function of oocytes treated by 50 μM CoQ10 could be boosted, through increasing the levels of mitochondrial membrane potential, ATP production and CoQ6, and changing the pattern of mitochondrial distribution as well. Moreover, 50 μM CoQ10 treatment suppressed the level of reactive oxygen species and reduced the percentage of oocytes with early apoptosis signal. Taken together, CoQ10 could improve the meiotic maturation of pig oocytes, especially for poor-quality oocytes, mainly through enhancing mitochondrial function and suppressing oxidative stress to reduce apoptosis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.theriogenology.2020.10.009DOI Listing
January 2021

Ascorbic acid promotes the reproductive function of porcine immature Sertoli cells through transcriptome reprogramming.

Theriogenology 2020 Dec 29;158:309-320. Epub 2020 Sep 29.

College of Animal Science and Technology, Northeast Agricultural University, Harbin, 150030, Heilongjiang, China; College of Animal Science, Yangtze University, Jingzhou, 434025, Hubei, China. Electronic address:

Vitamin C (ascorbic acid, AA) can regulate antioxidation and affect many cellular processes. However, the effect of AA on the reproduction of male animals remains less explored. Here, we showed that by supplementing exogenous AA to porcine immature Sertoli cells (iSCs), AA could promote the proliferation, suppress apoptosis, and decrease the global nucleic acid methylation (5 mC and mA) levels of iSCs. After we profiled mRNA and long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) expression by transcriptome sequencing on iSCs (treated by 250 μM AA for 36 h), 1232 mRNAs and 937 lncRNAs were identified to be differentially expressed (DE). Gene enrichment analysis found multiple significantly enriched biological pathways, including oxidoreductase activity, cell proliferation and apoptosis, regulation of hormone level, regulation of catalytic activity, developmental process, ATP metabolism and reproductive process. Specifically, for the reproductive process, 49 up- and 36 down-regulated DE mRNAs (including highly expressed genes, such as Tfcp2l1, Hmgcs1, Mmp7, Fndc3a, and Zfp36l1) are involved. Moreover, AA supplementation could promote the secretion of anti-müllerian hormone, inhibin B and lactate, and enhance the activity of lactate dehydrogenase as well. Taken together, AA could promote the reproductive function of pig iSCs, potentially through reprogramming the global transcriptome, and elevating hormone secretion and metabolite production.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.theriogenology.2020.09.022DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7524525PMC
December 2020
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