Publications by authors named "Qi-zhao Zhou"

23 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

BMI1 activates P-glycoprotein via transcription repression of and enhances chemoresistance of bladder cancer cell.

Aging (Albany NY) 2021 07 16;13(14):18310-18330. Epub 2021 Jul 16.

Department of Urology, The Third Affiliated Hospital of Southern Medical University, Guangzhou 510630, China.

Chemoresistance is the most significant reason for the failure of cancer treatment following radical cystectomy. The response rate to the first-line chemotherapy of cisplatin and gemcitabine does not exceed 50%. In our previous research, elevated BMI1 (B-cell specific Moloney murine leukemia virus integration region 1) expression in bladder cancer conferred poor survival and was associated with chemoresistance. Herein, via analysis of The Cancer Genome Atlas database and validation of clinical samples, BMI1 was elevated in patients with bladder cancer resistant to cisplatin and gemcitabine, which conferred tumor relapse and progression. Consistently, BMI1 was markedly increased in the established cisplatin- and gemcitabine-resistant T24 cells (T24/DDP&GEM). Functionally, BMI1 overexpression dramatically promoted drug efflux, enhanced viability and decreased apoptosis of bladder cancer cells upon treatment with cisplatin or gemcitabine, whereas BMI1 downregulation reversed this effect. Mechanically, upon interaction with p53, BMI1 was recruited on the promoter of gene concomitant with an increase in the mono-ubiquitination of histone H2A lysine 119, leading to transcription repression of gene followed by derepression of (ATP binding cassette subfamily B member 1) gene. Moreover, suppression of P-glycoprotein by miR-3682-3p mimics or its inhibitor XR-9576, could significantly reverse chemoresistance of T24/DDP&GEM cells. These results provided a novel insight into a portion of the mechanism underlying BMI1-mediated chemoresistance in bladder cancer.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.18632/aging.203277DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8351696PMC
July 2021

Comprehensive signature analysis of drug metabolism differences in the White, Black and Asian prostate cancer patients.

Aging (Albany NY) 2021 06 18;13(12):16316-16340. Epub 2021 Jun 18.

Department of Urology, The Third Affiliated Hospital of Southern Medical University, Guangzhou 510630, China.

The drug response sensitivity and related prognosis of prostate cancer varied from races, while the original mechanism remains rarely understood. In this study, the comprehensive signature including transcriptomics, epigenome and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of 485 PCa cases- including 415 Whites, 58 Blacks and 12 Asians from the TCGA database were analyzed to investigate the drug metabolism differences between races. We found that Blacks and Whites had a more prominent drug metabolism, cytotoxic therapy resistance, and endocrine therapy resistance than Asians, while Whites were more prominent in drug metabolism, cytotoxic therapy resistance and endocrine therapy resistance than Blacks. Subsequently, the targeted regulation analysis indicated that the racial differences in cytotoxic therapy resistance, endocrine therapy resistance, might originate from drug metabolisms, and 19 drug metabolism-related core genes were confirmed in the multi-omics network for subsequent analysis. Furthermore, we verified that significantly affected antineoplastic drugs sensitivities in PCa cell lines, and these genes also showed good predictive efficiency of drug response and treatment outcomes for PCa in this cohort of patients. These findings revealed a comprehensive signature of drug metabolism differences for the Whites, Blacks and Asians, and it may provide some evidence for making individualized treatment strategies.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.18632/aging.203158DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8266326PMC
June 2021

Protective effect of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell-derived exosomes against the reproductive toxicity of cyclophosphamide is associated with the p38MAPK/ERK and AKT signaling pathways.

Asian J Androl 2021 Jul-Aug;23(4):386-391

Department of Urology, The Third Affiliated Hospital of Southern Medical University, Guangzhou 510630, China.

Spermatogenic dysfunction caused by cyclophosphamide (CP) chemotherapy has seriously influenced the life quality of patients. Unfortunately, treatments for CP-induced testicular spermatogenic dysfunction are limited, and the molecular mechanisms are not fully understood. For the first time, here, we explored the effects of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell-derived exosomes (BMSC-exos) on CP-induced testicular spermatogenic dysfunction in vitro and in vivo. BMSC-exos could be taken up by spermatogonia (GC1-spg cells). CP-injured GC1-spg cells and BMSC-exos were cocultured at various doses, and then, cell proliferation was measured using 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5 diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. In addition, photophosphorylation of extracellular-regulated kinase (ERK), p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38MAPK), and protein kinase B (AKT) proteins was evaluated by western blotting as well as apoptosis in GC1-spg cells measured using flow cytometry. Treatment with BMSC-exos enhanced cell proliferation and reduced apoptosis of CP-injured GCI-spg cells. Phosphorylated levels of ERK, AKT, and p38MAPK proteins were reduced in CP-injured spermatogonia when co-treated with BMSC-exos, indicating that BMSC-exos acted against the reproductive toxicity of CP via the p38MAPK/ERK and AKT signaling pathways. In experiments in vivo, CP-treated rats received BMSC-exos by injection into the tail vein, and testis morphology was compared between treated and control groups. Histology showed that transfusion of BMSC-exos inhibited the pathological changes in CP-injured testes. Thus, BMSC-exos could counteract the reproductive toxicity of CP via the p38MAPK/ERK and AKT signaling pathways. The findings provide a potential treatment for CP-induced male spermatogenic dysfunction using BMSC-exos.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/aja.aja_98_20DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8269825PMC
February 2021

A novel robust nomogram based on peripheral monocyte counts for predicting lymph node metastasis of prostate cancer.

Asian J Androl 2021 Jul-Aug;23(4):409-414

Department of Urology, The Third Affiliated Hospital of Southern Medical University, Guangzhou 510630, China.

Accurate methods for identifying pelvic lymph node metastasis (LNM) of prostate cancer (PCa) prior to surgery are still lacking. We aimed to investigate the predictive value of peripheral monocyte count (PMC) for LNM of PCa in this study. Two hundred and ninety-eight patients from three centers were divided into a training set (n = 125) and a validation set (n = 173). In the training set, the independent predictors of LNM were analyzed using univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses, and the optimal cutoff value was calculated by the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve. The sensitivity and specificity of the optimal cutoff were authenticated in the validation cohort. Finally, a nomogram based on the PMC was constructed for predicting LNM. Multivariate analyses of the training cohort demonstrated that clinical T stage, preoperative Gleason score, and PMC were independent risk factors for LNM. The subsequent ROC analysis showed that the optimal cutoff value of PMC for diagnosing LNM was 0.405 × 109 l with a sensitivity of 60.0% and a specificity of 67.8%. In the validation set, the optimal cutoff value showed significantly higher sensitivity than that of conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) (0.619 vs 0.238, P < 0.001). The nomogram involving PMC, free prostate-specific antigen (fPSA), clinical T stage, preoperative Gleason score, and monocyte-to-lymphocyte ratio (MLR) was generated, which showed a robust predictive capacity for predicting LNM before the operation. Our results indicated that PMC as a single agent, or combined with other clinical parameters, showed a robust predictive capacity for LNM in PCa. It can be employed as a complementary factor for the decision of whether to conduct pelvic lymph node dissection.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/aja.aja_89_20DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8269827PMC
February 2021

[Effects of silencing the SEMG1 protein on the cycle and apoptosis of GC-1 spg cells].

Zhonghua Nan Ke Xue 2020 Sep;26(9):771-776

Department of Urology, the Third Affiliated Hospital of Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510630, China .

Objective: To investigate the effects of silencing the semenogelin 1 (SEMG1) protein on the cycle and apoptosis of the spermatogonia germ cell line (GC-1 spg).

Methods: SEMG1-specific siRNA was transfected into GC-1 spg cells by lipofectamine 2000 (the siRNA-SEMG1 group), the relative expression levels of the SEMG1 protein in the GC-1 spg cells of the siRNA-SEMG1, blank control and negative control groups were detected by Western blot, and the apoptosis and cycle of the cells in different groups were determined by flow cytometry.

Results: The expression of the SEMG1 protein in the GC-1 spg cells was dramatically decreased in the siRNA-SEMG1 group compared with those in the blank and negative control groups (1.80±0.05 vs 2.51±0.13 and 2.50±0.12, P < 0.01), but the apoptosis rate was remarkably higher in the former than in the latter two groups ([6.77 ± 0.15]% vs [0.70 ± 0.06]% and [0.8 ± 0.06]%, P < 0.01). No statistically significant difference was observed in the cell cycles among the three groups (P > 0.05). In addition, Western blot showed that the expression of the caspase-3 protein was significantly higher and that of the BCL2 protein markedly lower in the siRNA-SEMG1 than in the blank and negative control groups (P < 0.05).

Conclusions: SEMG1-specific siRNA can effectively silence the expression of the SEMG1 protein in GC-1 spg cells and promote their apoptosis.
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September 2020

Down regulating PHGDH affects the lactate production of sertoli cells in varicocele.

Reprod Biol Endocrinol 2020 Jul 14;18(1):70. Epub 2020 Jul 14.

Department of Urology, the Third Affiliated Hospital of Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, China.

Background: Although varicocele is considered to be one of the leading causes of male infertility, the precise mechanism underlying how varicocele leads to male infertility is not completely understood. We found the lactate concentration on the varicocele side of the patients was decreased compare with peripheral venous blood. In the testicles, the lactate produced by the sertoli cells through the glycolysis pathway provides most of the energy needed for spermatogenesis, the reduction of lactate will affect spermatogenesis. The objective of this study was to investigate the mechanism of this abnormal energy metabolism phenomenon in varicocele.

Methods: In this study, we collected the testicular tissue from patients with varicocele, the glycolysis related proteins PHGDH was identified by iTRAQ proteomics technology. Experimental rat varicocele model was constructed according to our new clip technique, the mRNA and protein expression levels of PHGDH were examined with qRT-PCR and Western blotting. We constructed a sertoli cell of PHGDH down-regulation model, and then detected the glucose consumption, LDH activities and lactate production in the sertoli cells. Western blot was conducted to investigate the effects of PHGDH on the expression of phosphoserine phosphatase (PSPH) and Pyruvate kinase M2 (PKM2). Flow cytometry was used to detect the cell apoptosis and cell cycle in sertoli cells.

Results: The results showed that testicular protein PHGDH was down-regulated in patients with varicocele and in experimental rat varicocele model. Down-regulation of PHGDH in sertoli cells significantly decreased the glucose consumption, LDH activities and lactate production in the sertoli cells, indicating that the low expression of PHGDH ultimately led to a decrease in lactate production by affecting the glycolysis. The Western blot results showed that the down-regulation of PHGDH significantly reduced the expression of pathway protein PSPH and PKM2, leading to the reduction of lactate production. Moreover, PHGDH knockdown can promote apoptosis and inhibit cell cycle to affect cell growth.

Conclusions: Overall, we conformed that varicocele lead to the decreasing of testis lactate production. Down-regulation of PHGDH in sertoli cells may mediate the process of abnormal glucose metabolism. Our study provide new insight into the mechanisms underlying metabolism-associated male infertility and suggests a novel therapeutic target for male infertility.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12958-020-00625-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7359552PMC
July 2020

Predictive value of cadherin-11 for subsequent recurrence and progression in non-muscle invasive bladder cancer.

Jpn J Clin Oncol 2020 Apr;50(4):456-464

Department of Urology, The Third Affiliated Hospital of Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, China.

Background: Cadherin-11 (CDH11) is a type II cadherin and reported to function as an oncogene in various cancers. Our present study aims to investigate the role of CDH11 in bladder cancer (BCA).

Methods: Bioinformatics analysis was performed in four independent microarray data including 56 non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) and 132 muscle-invasive bladder cancer (MIBC) tissues from Gene Expression Omnibus to screen out differentially expressed genes. Next, we detected CDH11 expression in BCA specimens and cell lines by qPCR and western blotting assays. Immunohistochemical analyses were performed in 209 paraffin-embedded BCA samples and 30 adjacent normal bladder tissues.

Results: Bioinformatics analysis revealed that CDH11 had a higher expression level in MIBC tissues than in NMIBC, which was consistent with our clinical BCA specimens and cell lines at both mRNA and protein levels. Immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated that over-expression of CDH11 was closely related to the histological grade, pT status, tumour size and poor outcomes of BCA patients. What's more, CDH11 (area under curve (AUC) = 0.673 and 0.735) had a better predictive value than E-cadherin (AUC = 0.629 and 0.629) and a similar discrimination with the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) score system (AUC = 0.719 and 0.667) in evaluating potential recurrence and progression of NMIBC. Moreover, combination of CDH11 and EORTC score system was the best predictive model in predicting recurrence of NMIBC (AUC = 0.779) among the three models.

Conclusions: CDH11 was a reliable therapeutic target in BCA and a useful index to predict the possibilities of recurrence and progression in NMIBC patients.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/jjco/hyz186DOI Listing
April 2020

Optimal Starting Age and Baseline Level for Repeat Tests: Economic Concerns of PSA Screening for Chinese Men - 10-Year Experience of a Single Center.

Urol Int 2020 26;104(3-4):230-238. Epub 2019 Nov 26.

Department of Urology, The Third Affiliated Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, China,

Objective: To investigate the optimal age for the baseline serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test and for repeat screening and its economic burden in a single center in China.

Materials And Methods: 35,533 men with PSA screening were retrospectively enrolled in this study. Follow-ups were conducted in 1,586 men with PSA >4 ng/mL, and receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curves were employed to investigate the optimal cutoffs.

Results: ROC analysis indicated that the optimal age for initial PSA screening was 57.5 years (AUC = 0.84), 62.5 years (AUC = 0.902), 60.5 years (AUC = 0.909), and 61.5 years (AUC = 0.890) for individuals with PSA >4 and >10 ng/mL, a diagnosis of prostate cancer (PCa), and clinically significant PCa defined as the focus events, respectively. For Chinese men aged 50-59, 60-69, and >70 years, the initial PSA levels of 1.305 ng/mL (AUC = 0.699), 1.975 ng/mL (AUC = 0.711), and 2.740 ng/mL (AUC = 0.720) might have a PSA velocity >0.75 ng/mL per year during the follow-up. In addition, the total cost amounts to CNY 13,609,260 in these cases, but only 60 of the 35,533 (0.17%) men gained benefit from PSA screening.

Conclusion: In our opinion, the optimal starting age for initial PSA testing was 57.5 years. The necessity for repeat screening should be based on the first PSA level depending on age. A cost--benefit analysis should be included in population-based screening.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000503733DOI Listing
January 2021

With a new clip technique surgically inducing varicocele in Sprague-Dawley rats.

BMC Urol 2018 Jun 7;18(1):58. Epub 2018 Jun 7.

Department of Urology, the Third Affiliated Hospital of Southern Medical University, No. 183 West Zhongshan Road, Tianhe District, 510630, Guangzhou, People's Republic of China.

Background: We introduced and recreated a more consistent and effective experimental varicocele rat model by a new clip technique.

Methods: A total of 40 rats were numbered and randomly assigned to 5 groups of 8 each, including sham surgery (Group I), conventional (Group II) and clip groups with 0.7, 0.8, 0.9 mm gap widths, respectively (Group III, IV, V). All of the rats in each group were sacrificed at 8 weeks after initial surgery, and the rats forming out with less than 1 mm diameter of left spermatic vein or no presence of the pampiniform plexus dilation were excluded from the experimental groups. The left spermatic vein (LSV) diameter, testicular weight, left kidney weight to body weight coefficients, kidney and testicular histology were determined.

Results: The baseline mean diameter of the LSV in Group I, II and III was 0.22 ± 0.02, 0.23 ± 0.02 and 0.22 ± 0.03 mm, respectively (P = 0.7504). At 8 weeks after initial surgery, varicocele was successfully created in 6/8 (75%), 7/8 (87.5%), 3/8 (37.5%), 3/8 (37.5%) in GroupII-V, no varicocele was observed in Group I. In Group I, II and III, no pathological changes were observed and the left kidney weight to body weight coefficients showed no significant differences. The diameter of LSV was remarkably increased both in Group II and III compared to Group I (1.72 ± 0.13, 1.57 ± 0.19 and 0.25 ± 0.02, respectively), and Group II and III had a smaller testicular weight than the rats in Group I (1.67 ± 0.05, 1.62 ± 0.06, and 1.92 ± 0.12, respectively).

Conclusions: With a new clip technique, surgically inducing varicocele rat model becomes convenient and safe. This appears to improve the effectiveness of the model and this innovation may allow us to further understand the pathophysiology of varicocele.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12894-018-0350-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5992893PMC
June 2018

[Changed percentage of myeloid-derived suppressor cells in the peripheral blood of prostate cancer patients and its clinical implication].

Zhonghua Nan Ke Xue 2016 Nov;22(11):963-967

Department of Urology, The Third Affiliated Hospital of Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510630, China.

Objective: To investigate the changes in the percentage of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) in the peripheral blood of prostate cancer (PCa) patients and explore the correlation of MDSCs and their subsets with the prognosis of PCa.

Methods: Using flow cytometry, we determined the percentage of MDSCs and the levels of Arg-1, iNOS and PD-L1 in the peripheral blood of 32 PCa patients and 25 healthy controls, detected the distribution of CD14+ Mo-MDSC and CD15+ PMN-MDSC subsets, and analyzed the correlation between the obtained parameters and the prognosis of PCa.

Results: Compared with the healthy controls, the PCa patients showed significant increases in the percentage of MDSCs (P<0.01) and levels of Arg-1, iNOS and PD-L1 in the peripheral blood. Statistically significant differences were observed in the distribution of the CD14+ Mo-MDSC and CD15+ PMN-MDSC subsets between the two groups(60.4% vs 72.2%, 29.5% vs 18.8%) (P<0.05). The percentages of MDSCs and Mo-MDSCs were remarkably correlated with the total survival rate of the PCa patients (P=0.025 and 0.017).

Conclusions: The percentages of MDSCs and CD14+ Mo-MDSCs in the peripheral blood were correlated with the prognosis of PCa, which may provide a target or some evidence for the clinical treatment of PCa.
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November 2016

MicroRNA-27a-mediated repression of cysteine-rich secretory protein 2 translation in asthenoteratozoospermic patients.

Asian J Androl 2017 Sep-Oct;19(5):591-595

Department of Urology, The Third Affiliated Hospital of Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, China.

Cysteine-rich secretory protein 2 (CRISP2) is an important protein in spermatozoa that plays roles in modulating sperm flagellar motility, the acrosome reaction, and gamete fusion. Spermatozoa lacking CRISP2 exhibit low sperm motility and abnormal morphology. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the reduction of CRISP2 in asthenoteratozoospermia (ATZ) remain unknown. In this study, low expression of CRISP2 protein rather than its mRNA was observed in the ejaculated spermatozoa from ATZ patients as compared with normozoospermic males. Subsequently, bioinformatic prediction, luciferase reporter assays, and microRNA-27a (miR-27a) transfection experiments revealed that miR-27a specifically targets CRISP2 by binding to its 3' untranslated region (3'-UTR), suppressing CRISP2 expression posttranscriptionally. Further evidence was provided by the clinical observation of high miR-27a expression in ejaculated spermatozoa from ATZ patients and a negative correlation between miR-27a expression and CRISP2 protein expression. Finally, a retrospective follow-up study supported that both high miR-27a expression and low CRISP2 protein expression were associated with low progressive sperm motility, abnormal morphology, and infertility. This study demonstrates a novel mechanism responsible for reduced CRISP2 expression in ATZ, which may offer a potential therapeutic target for treating male infertility, or for male contraception.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/1008-682X.185001DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5566855PMC
May 2018

[Application value of real-time contrast-enhanced ultrasound in transrectal prostate biopsy].

Zhonghua Nan Ke Xue 2016 Aug;22(8):698-703

Department of Urology, The Third Affiliated Hospital of Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510630, China.

Objective: To explore the application value of real-time contrast-enhanced ultrasound (RTCEU) in improving the detection rate of transrectal ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy.

Methods: This prospective study included 91 male patients with abnormally high PSA (4-20 μg/L) or abnormalities in DRE or MRI, who underwent 12+X prostate biopsy following conventional transrectal ultrasonography (TRUS) and RTCEU examination. We compared the numbers of suspected prostatic nodules before and after RTCEU as well as the detection rates of prostate cancer between conventional TRUS-guided 12PBx and 12PBx plus lesion-targeted biopsy procedures.

Results: Totally, 57 of the 86 suspected lesions on TRUS (66.3%), and 108 of the 118 abnormal nodules on RTCEU (91.5%) were confirmed to be prostate cancer. RTCEU achieved a significantly higher detection rate than TRUS (P<0.01). A total of 39 cases of prostate cancer (42.8%) were detected by RTCEU, while only 28 (30.7%) by TRUS, with statistically significant difference in the detection rate between the two procedures (P=0.033).

Conclusions: Real-time contrast-enhanced ultrasound can significantly improve the detection rate of prostate cancer and provide a valuable guide to targeted prostate biopsy.
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August 2016

The expression of cysteine-rich secretory protein 2 (CRISP2) and its specific regulator miR-27b in the spermatozoa of patients with asthenozoospermia.

Biol Reprod 2015 Jan 10;92(1):28. Epub 2014 Dec 10.

Department of Urology, The Third Affiliated Hospital of Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, Guangdong, China

Cysteine-rich secretory protein 2 (CRISP2) is an important sperm protein and plays roles in spermatogenesis, modulation of flagellar motility, acrosome reaction, and gamete fusion. Clinical evidence shows a reduced CRISP2 expression in spermatozoa from asthenozoospermic patients, but the molecular mechanism underlying its reduction remains unknown. Herein, we carried out a study focusing on the CRISP2 reduction and its roles in asthenozoospermia. Initially, through analyzing CRISP2 expression and methylation on CRISP2 promoter activity in sperm, we observed a decreased expression of CRISP2 protein rather than its mRNA in the ejaculated spermatozoa from asthenozoospermic patients and no methylation in the CRISP2 promoter, suggesting CRISP2 expression may be regulated in the sperm at the posttranscriptional level. Subsequently, we found that microRNA 27b (miR-27b), predicted as a candidate regulator of CRISP2 using bioinformatics, was highly expressed in the ejaculated spermatozoa from asthenozoospermic patients. Luciferase reporter assay and transfection experiments disclosed that this microRNA could target CRISP2 by specifically binding its 3' untranslated region, suppressing CRISP2 expression. Extended clinical observation further confirmed a highly expressed miR-27b and its obviously negative correlation with CRISP2 protein expression in ejaculated spermatozoa samples from asthenozoospermic patients. Finally, we conducted a retrospective follow-up study to support that either high miR-27b expression or low CRISP2 protein expression was significantly associated with low sperm progressive motility, abnormal morphology, and infertility. Thus, this study provides the first preliminary insight into the mechanism leading to the reduced CRISP2 expression in asthenozoospermia, offering a potential therapeutic target for treating male infertility or for male contraception.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1095/biolreprod.114.124487DOI Listing
January 2015

[B-ultrasound guided aspiration and sclerotherapy with 2% iodophor for renal cysts].

Nan Fang Yi Ke Da Xue Xue Bao 2011 Oct;31(10):1797-8

Department of Urology, Third Affiliated Hospital of Southern Medicine University, Guangzhou, China.

Objective: To evaluate the efficacy of B-ultrasound-guided aspiration and sclerotherapy with 2% iodophor for treatment of renal cysts.

Methods: Twenty-eight cases of sympotomatic renal cysts were treated with B-ultrasound-guided aspiration followed by sclerotherapy with 2% iodopher, which was maintained for 20 min. After extraction of iodopher, another injection of 2% iodopher (5-10 ml) into the cysts was given. The patients were followed up for 6 months to 18 months.

Results: Full recovery was achieved in 25 cases and improvement in 2 cases. Recurrence was found in 1 case after the treatment.

Conclusions: B-ultrasound-guided aspiration and sclerotherapy with 2% iodophor is safe, minimally invasive, and highly effective for treatment of symptomatic renal cysts.
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October 2011

[Differentially expressed genes in asthenospermia: a bioinformatics-based study].

Zhonghua Nan Ke Xue 2011 Aug;17(8):694-8

Department of Urology, Nanfang Hospital, Guangdong 510515, China.

Objective: To study the differentially expressed genes in asthenospermia to gain a deeper insight into the molecular mechanisms of the disease.

Methods: We analyzed the differentially expressed genes in asthenospermia using GATHER, PANTHER and ToppGene online bioinformatics tools.

Results: Our bioinformatics mining and analyses revealed that the differentially expressed genes in asthenospermia played important roles in the cellular protein and macromolecular metabolism, protein modification, cell death, cell apoptosis and apoptosis induction.

Conclusion: Asthenospermia patients experience a decline in sperm activity and the basic life activities of sperm simultaneously, and are also prone to cell apoptosis or death. Such differentially expressed genes as KIF3B, MYO15A, KIF6, KIF26B, KIF3A, DNHD2, DMN, DYNC2H1, STARD9, MYOHD1, and TPM1, which are involved in cytoskeletal structure, microtubule movement and cell movement, may be associated with asthenospermia, and therefore deserve further studies.
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August 2011

[Expressions of cysteine-rich secretory protein 2 in asthenospermia].

Zhonghua Nan Ke Xue 2011 Mar;17(3):203-7

Department of Urology, Nanfang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510515, China.

Objective: To investigate the mRNA and protein expression levels of cysteine-rich secretory protein 2 (CRISP2) in the sperm of asthenospermia patients, and explore their relationship with sperm motility and related molecular mechanism.

Methods: We collected 78 semen samples from adult male patients with asthenospermia and another 70 from healthy volunteers as controls. We extracted total RNA and total protein from the sperm following purification of the sperm by Percoll gradient centrifugation, and detected the relative expressions of CRISP2 mRNA and protein in the two groups by RT-PCR, SYBR Green real-time PCR and Western blot.

Results: The expression of CRISP2 mRNA was down-regulated by 4.3 times and that of the CRISP2 protein by 1.71 times in the asthenospermia patients, significantly lower than in the normal control group (P < 0.05).

Conclusion: The down-regulation of CRISP2 mRNA and protein expressions in the sperm of asthenospermia patients may be closely related with decreased sperm motility, which suggests that CRISP2 may serve as a potential molecular target for the research of asthenospermia.
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March 2011

[Efficacy of low-dose tadalafil on ED assessed by Self-Esteem and Relationship Questionnaire].

Zhonghua Nan Ke Xue 2010 Dec;16(12):1147-9

Department of Urology, Nanfang Hospital, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510515, China.

Objective: To explore the effects of low-dose oral tadalafil on self-esteem, confidence and sexual relationship in ED patients.

Methods: We treated 17 ED patients with oral tadalafil at the low dose of 5 mg once daily for 12 weeks, and used the paired t test to compare their scores on The Self-Esteem and Relationship Questionnaire (SEAR) and IIEF-5 and the results of nocturnal penile tumescence (NPT) obtained by nocturnal electrobioimpedance volumetric assessment (NEVA) before and after the medication.

Results: The scores on SEAR and IIEF-5 were significantly increased (P < 0.01) and NPT markedly improved (P < 0.05) after tadalafil treatment as compared with the baseline.

Conclusion: Low-dose oral tadalafil once daily can significantly improve the self-esteem, confidence, sexual relationship satisfaction and NPT of ED patients.
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December 2010

[Correlation of aging with psychological and organic ED: nocturnal electrobioimpedance volumetric assessment of 83 cases].

Zhonghua Nan Ke Xue 2010 Oct;16(10):915-8

Department of Urology, Nanfang Hospital, Guangdong 510515, China.

Objective: The ratio of psychological to organic ED changes with aging. This study aimed to analyze the results of nocturnal electrobioimpedance volumetric assessment (NEVA) for ED patients of different age groups and their significance in the diagnosis of ED.

Methods: A total of 83 ED patients were divided into 4 age groups (< or = 29 yr, 30 -39 yr, 40 -49 yr and > or = 50 yr) and detected for nocturnal penile tumescence (NPT) by NEVA.

Results: Thirty-four of the cases were diagnosed as organic ED, and the other 49 as psychological ED. With the increase of age, the former was increased from 30.3% in the < or = 29 yr group to 60.0% in the > or = 50 yr group, while the latter decreased from 69.7% to 40.0%.

Conclusion: The percentage of organic ED tends to grow with the increase of age, while that of psychological ED is just the opposite.
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October 2010

[Single- and two-layer gradient centrifugation in sperm separation: comparison and appraisal].

Zhonghua Nan Ke Xue 2010 Mar;16(3):217-9

Department of Urology, Nanfang Hospital, China.

Objective: To appraise the effect of single- and two-layer Percoll density gradient centrifugation in sperm separation.

Methods: Twenty semen specimens underwent single-(50%) and two-layer (90% and 45%) density gradient centrifugation, respectively. The sperm class analyzer (SCA) was used to analyze sperm density, motility and dynamic parameters and round cell density before and after the treatment.

Results: After separation, the sperm recovery rate of the single-layer method was (65.5 +/- 12.8)%, significantly higher than that of the two-layer method (P < 0.01). The percentages of grade a sperm of the single- and two-layer method were significantly higher than pre-treatment (P < 0.05, P < 0.01), that of the single-layer was significantly lower than that of the two-layer method (P < 0.05), but the percentage of grade c sperm of the former was significantly higher than that of the latter (P < 0.05). Compared with pre-treatment, the percentage of grade a + b sperm of the two-layer method was significantly higher (P < 0.05), while that of the single-layer method showed no significant difference (P > 0.05), and the round cell density of both the methods was significantly lower (P < 0.05, P < 0.01), with no significant differences between the two methods (P > 0.05).

Conclusion: The single-layer method yields a higher rate of sperm recovery and causes little change in the sperm motility, while the two-layer method effects a lower rate and significantly improves sperm motility. Both the methods can efficiently separate sperm from round cells, and each has its own advantages and its application value in in vitro treatment of sperm.
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March 2010

[Update of asthenospermia-related genes and proteins].

Zhonghua Nan Ke Xue 2009 Sep;15(9):836-9

Department of Urology, Nanfang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510515, China.

One of the most common causes of male infertility is asthenospermia, whose pathogenesis, however, is not yet clear. Recent researches have found that some genes (such as tektin-2, DNAI1, DNAH5, DNAH11, AKAP4, SEPT4 and Smcp) and proteins (such as sperm proteins ACTB, ANXA5, PRM1, PRM2 and SABP and seminal proteins Tf, PSA, PAP and Fractalkine) are associated with asthenospermia. The finding of these molecular markers has provided a base for the explanation of the molecular mechanism of asthenospermia, and these markers may become the diagnostic and therapeutic targets of the disease.
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September 2009

[Minute dose of tadalafil for nocturnal penile tumescence].

Zhonghua Nan Ke Xue 2009 Aug;15(8):730-2

Department of Urology, Nanfang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510515, China.

Objective: To investigate the efficacy of tadalafil on nocturnal penile tumescence (NPT).

Methods: Thirty-four patients with organic erectile dysfunction (ED) were treated with oral tadalafil at the dose of 10 mg/3 d before bedtime. A month later, 14 of the patients were observed for NPT by nocturnal electrobioimpedance volumetric assessment (NEVA).

Results: The parameters of erectile function significantly improved in the 14 patients (P < 0.05).

Conclusion: Oral administration of minute dose of tadalafil can improve NPT in organic ED patients.
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August 2009

[Identification of human testicular embryonal carcinoma proteins by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry].

Nan Fang Yi Ke Da Xue Xue Bao 2009 Aug;29(8):1585-7

Department of Urology, Nanfang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou 510515, China.

Objective: To separate and identify human testicular embryonal carcinoma proteomics using two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) and mass spectrometry.

Methods: Immobilized pH gradient two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis was used to separate the total proteins of the samples. After silver staining, PDQuest 7.30 image analysis software was applied to analyze the 2-DE images. Three of the proteins highly expressed in human testicular embryonal carcinoma were identified by matrix-assisted laser adsorption/ionization-time of flight-tandem mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS/MS).

Results: 2-DE effectively screened the differentially expressed proteins in the carcinoma tissues. Three proteins highly expressed in the carcinoma were successfully identified.

Conclusion: The proteins of human testicular embryonal carcinoma can be effectively separated and analyzed using 2-DE and mass spectrometry. Proteomic analysis offers a new means for further study of this carcinoma.
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August 2009

[Mining the specifically expressed genes in sperms based on the bioinformatics methods].

Nan Fang Yi Ke Da Xue Xue Bao 2009 Feb;29(2):185-90

Institute of Molecular Biology, Department of Stomatology, Nanfang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou 510515, China.

Objective: To analyze the specifically expressed genes in sperms for better understanding of the molecular characteristics of sperms.

Methods: The hybridization data the genes in the sperms, oocytes and 10 normal tissues were retrieved from the GEO database to identify the genes expressed specifically in sperms and the patterns of their regulation using such bioinformatic tools as GATHER, PANTHER and DAVID.

Results And Conclusions: Comparison of the spermatozoal gene expression profiles with those of the normal tissues identified 8998 differentially expressed probes, among which 25 genes were up-regulated by over 200 folds in the sperms. Comparison of the gene expression profiles between the oocytes and normal tissues resulted in the identification of 8981 differentially expressed probes. Of the 1709 up-regulated genes in the sperm with a ratio>5, 1218 genes showed similar expressions in the oocytes and the normal tissues, and 129 were up-regulated and 362 down-regulated in the oocytes. The 362 genes up-regulated in the sperms but down-regulated in the oocytes were involved mainly in protein modification and metabolism and nucleic acid metabolism, but very few participated in the intracellular signaling pathways. Numerous transcriptional factors containing the KRAB domain and receptor- independent serine/threonine kinase were specifically overexpressed in sperms, and the a very high proportion of the genes specifically overexpressed in the sperms coincided with the overexpressed genes in the neural stem cells and embryonic stem cells. The genes involved in the glycolysis were down-regulated in the sperms. These findings in the genes specifically expressed in the sperms by data mining using bioinformatic methods may provide better insight into the molecular characteristics of the sperms.
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February 2009
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