Publications by authors named "Q Cabon"

13 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Migrating grass awn within the intraconal part of the retrobulbar space in a dog.

J Small Anim Pract 2021 Mar 2. Epub 2021 Mar 2.

*Clinique vétérinaire Olliolis, 414a chemin des Canniers, Quartier Lagoubran, Ollioules, 83140, France.

A 1.5-year-old MC Cardigan Welsh Corgi was presented for a right oral fistula associated with left tonsil enlargement that responded to medical treatment. A first computed tomography scan was performed and showed no signs of a foreign body. Medical treatment was continued for 2 additional weeks and the dog was free of clinical signs for 3 months. The dog was presented again for a 3-day history of anorexia and marked pain when opening the jaw. The repeat computed tomography scan revealed a migrating foreign body near the optic canal of the right eye, and surgical exploration confirmed that it was trapped within the intraconal part of the retrobulbar space, abutting the optic nerve. The foreign body was surgically removed through an osteotomy of the zygomatic bone. The dog fully recovered with no vision loss. Based on the literature search, this is the first published report describing a migrating grass awn located in the intraconal part of the retrobulbar space, abutting the optic nerve.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jsap.13317DOI Listing
March 2021

Long-Term Safety and Efficacy of Single or Repeated Intra-Articular Injection of Allogeneic Neonatal Mesenchymal Stromal Cells for Managing Pain and Lameness in Moderate to Severe Canine Osteoarthritis Without Anti-inflammatory Pharmacological Support: Pilot Clinical Study.

Front Vet Sci 2019 5;6:10. Epub 2019 Feb 5.

Université de Lyon, VetAgro Sup, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vétérinaire, Marcy l'Etoile, France.

To explore the long-term safety and efficacy of canine allogeneic mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) administered intra-articularly as single or repeated injections in appendicular joints of dogs affected by moderate to severe refractory osteoarthritis. 22 pet dogs were recruited into a non-randomized, open and monocentric study initially administering one cellular injection. A second injection was offered after 6 months to owners if the first injection did not produce expected results. Anti-inflammatory treatment (if prescribed) was discontinued at last one week before the onset of treatment. Each injection consisted of at least 10 million viable neonatal allogeneic mesenchymal stromal cells obtained from fetal adnexa. Medical data was collected from veterinary clinical evaluations of joints up to 6 months post-injection and owner's assessment of their dog's mobility and well-being followed for a further 2 years when possible. Mild, immediate self-limiting inflammatory joint reactions were observed in 5/22 joints after the first injection, and in almost all dogs having a subsequent injection. No other MSC-related adverse medical events were reported, neither during the 6 months follow up visits, nor during the long-term (2-years) safety follow up. Veterinary clinical evaluation showed a significant and durable clinical improvement (up to 6 months) following MSC administration. Eight dogs (11 joints) were re-injected 6 months apart, sustaining clinical benefits up to 1 year. Owner's global satisfaction reached 75% at 2 years post-treatment Our data suggest that a single or repeated intra-articular administration of neonatal MSC in dogs with moderate to severe OA is a safe procedure and confer clinical benefits over a 24-month period. When humoral response against MSC is investigated by flow cytometry, a positive mild and transient signal was detected in only one dog from the studied cohort, this dog having had a positive clinical outcome.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fvets.2019.00010DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6371748PMC
February 2019

Cholecystopexy and Pericardial Pseudocyst Removal in a Dog with a Congenital Peritoneopericardial Diaphragmatic Hernia.

J Am Anim Hosp Assoc 2017 Sep/Oct;53(5):270-276. Epub 2017 Aug 9.

From the VetAgroSup, Campus Vétérinaire de Lyon, Lyon, France (Q.C.); Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Centre Vétérinaire Laval, Québec, Canada (E.N.C.); and the Department of Surgery, Clinique Vétérinaire Cabassu, Marseille, France (J.C.).

A 4 mo old spayed female golden retriever was presented with a peritoneopericardial diaphragmatic hernia (PPDH) that was diagnosed during neutering. Echocardiography revealed a fluid-filled structure and parts of the liver in the pericardial cavity. Computed tomography confirmed the existence of the PPDH and the herniation of the right medial liver lobe and the gallbladder. Cystic masses were observed in the pericardial and the peritoneal cavities, possibly communicating through the PPDH. A median laparotomy revealed a single lobulated cystic lesion extending into both the pericardial and peritoneal cavities through the PPDH. Because of the nonviable aspect of some parts of the liver parenchyma, the gallbladder was dissected from the fossa, and the central division of the liver was resected. A cholecystopexy was performed on the diaphragm to limit gallbladder mobility. The PPDH was closed in the standard fashion. Histopathology of the cystic structure was compatible with a pericardial pseudocyst. Two months postoperatively, the dog was healthy, and the results of blood biochemistry and abdominal ultrasonography were normal. A pericardial pseudocyst can be associated with a PPDH in young dogs. Moreover, cholecystopexy appears to be a safe and effective method of limiting gallbladder mobility after resection of the central hepatic division.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.5326/JAAHA-MS-6457DOI Listing
January 2019

Evaluation of the Effect of a Single Intra-articular Injection of Allogeneic Neonatal Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Compared to Oral Non-Steroidal Anti-inflammatory Treatment on the Postoperative Musculoskeletal Status and Gait of Dogs over a 6-Month Period after Tibial Plateau Leveling Osteotomy: A Pilot Study.

Front Vet Sci 2017 8;4:83. Epub 2017 Jun 8.

Small Animal Surgery Department, VetAgro Sup, Marcy L'Etoile, France.

Objective: Compare the clinical and pressure walkway gait evolution of dogs after a tibial plateau leveling osteotomy (TPLO) for a cranial cruciate ligament rupture (CrCLR) and treatment with either a 1-month course of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) or a single postoperative intra-articular (IA) injection of allogeneic neonatal mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs).

Study Design: Prospective, double-blinded, randomized, controlled, monocentric clinical study.

Animals: Sixteen client-owned dogs.

Materials And Methods: Dogs with unilateral CrCLR confirmed by arthroscopy were included. Allogeneic neonatal canine MSCs were obtained from fetal adnexa retrieved after C-section performed on healthy pregnant bitches. The dogs were randomly allocated to either the "MSCs group," receiving an IA injection of MSCs after TPLO, followed by placebo for 1 month, or the "NSAIDs group," receiving IA equivalent volume of MSCs vehicle after TPLO, followed by oral NSAID for 1 month. One of the three blinded evaluators assessed the dogs in each group before and after surgery (1, 3, and 6 months). Clinical score and gait and bone healing process were assessed. The data were statistically compared between the two groups for pre- and postoperative evaluations.

Results: Fourteen dogs (nine in the MSCs group, five in the NSAIDs group) completed the present study. No significant difference was observed between the groups preoperatively. No local or systemic adverse effect was observed after MSCs injection at any time point considered. At 1 month after surgery, bone healing scores were significantly higher in the MSCs group. At 1, 3, and 6 months after surgery, no significant difference was observed between the two groups for clinical scores and gait evaluation.

Conclusion: A single IA injection of allogeneic neonatal MSCs could be a safe and valuable postoperative alternative to NSAIDs for dogs requiring TPLO surgery, particularly for dogs intolerant to this class of drugs.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fvets.2017.00083DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5463535PMC
June 2017

Evaluation of a new method to determine the tibial tuberosity advancement distance required to reduce the patellar tendon-tibial plateau angle to 90° with the modified Maquet technique in dogs.

Am J Vet Res 2017 Apr;78(4):517-528

OBJECTIVE To assess use of a new radiographic method to determine the distance by which the tibial tuberosity should be advanced to reduce the patellar tendon-tibial plateau angle (PTA) to 90° by means of the modified Maquet technique (MMT) in dogs. SAMPLE 24 pelvic limbs from 12 adult medium-sized to large-breed canine cadavers. PROCEDURES Radiographs of stifle joints at 135° extension in true lateral position were used to determine tibial tuberosity advancement distances for use in the MMT. A method was devised to incorporate the planned osteotomy axis; distal patellar translations of 0, 3, 5, or 10 mm; and advancement cage implant application level along the osteotomy site in advancement planning measurements. Concordance correlation coefficients (CCCs) were calculated to compare these adjusted advancement measurements with true advancement measurements obtained for the same joints in another study after treatment by MMT. Intraobserver, interobserver, and total agreement for selected measurements were determined by assessment of CCCs for results obtained by 3 blinded observers. RESULTS Agreement between true advancement measurements and measurements obtained with osteotomy axis and cage position method calculations that incorporated a 5-mm distal patellar translation distance was excellent (CCC, 0.96). Intraobserver and interobserver agreements for the planning measurements evaluated were good to excellent (CCC, 0.83 to 0.96). CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results suggested that the osteotomy axis and cage position method incorporating a 5-mm distal patellar translation distance has the potential to improve success rates for achieving a PTA of 90° in medium-sized to large-breed dogs undergoing MMT for treatment of cranial cruciate ligament rupture. Further research is warranted.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2460/ajvr.78.4.517DOI Listing
April 2017

Comparison of desired radiographic advancement distance and true advancement distance required for patellar tendon-tibial plateau angle reduction to the ideal 90° in dogs by use of the modified Maquet technique.

Am J Vet Res 2016 Dec;77(12):1401-1410

OBJECTIVE To evaluate the validity of 2 radiographic methods for measurement of the tibial tuberosity advancement distance required to achieve a reduction in patellar tendon-tibial plateau angle (PTA) to the ideal 90° in dogs by use of the modified Maquet technique (MMT). SAMPLE 24 stifle joints harvested from 12 canine cadavers. PROCEDURES Radiographs of stifle joints placed at 135° in the true lateral position were used to measure the required tibial tuberosity advancement distance with the conventional (A) and correction (A) methods. The MMT was used to successively advance the tibial crest to A and A. Postoperative PTA was measured on a mediolateral radiograph for each advancement measurement method. If none of the measurements were close to 90°, the advancement distance was modified until the PTA was equal to 90° within 0.1°, and the true advancement distance (TA) was measured. Results were used to determine the optimal commercially available size of cage implant that would be used in a clinical situation. RESULTS Median A and A were 10.6 mm and 11.5 mm, respectively. Mean PTAs for the conventional and correction methods were 93.4° and 92.3°, respectively, and differed significantly from 90°. Median TA was 13.5 mm. The A and A led to the same cage size recommendations as for TA for only 1 and 4 stifle joints, respectively. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Both radiographic methods of measuring the distance required to advance the tibial tuberosity in dogs led to an under-reduction in postoperative PTA when the MMT was used. A new, more accurate radiographic method needs to be developed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2460/ajvr.77.12.1401DOI Listing
December 2016

Placement of subcutaneous ureteral bypasses without fluoroscopic guidance in cats with ureteral obstruction: 19 cases (2014-2016).

J Feline Med Surg 2017 Oct 30;19(10):1030-1039. Epub 2016 Sep 30.

1 Surgery Unit, Lyon Veterinary Teaching Hospital, Université de Lyon, Veterinary Campus of VetAgro Sup, Marcy l'Etoile, France.

Objectives The purpose of this study was to describe the perioperative and postoperative complications as well as short-term and long-term outcomes in cats with ureteral obstructions treated by placement of a subcutaneous ureteral bypass (SUB) device without imaging control. The second objective of this study was to compare cats treated by SUB device with cats treated by traditional surgical intervention. Methods Data were obtained retrospectively from the medical records (2014-2016) of cats that underwent SUB placement (SUB cats) and cats that underwent traditional ureteral surgery (C cats). Results Nineteen SUB devices were placed without fluoroscopic, radiographic or ultrasonographic guidance in 13 cats. Fifteen traditional interventions (ureterotomy and neoureterocystostomy) were performed in 11 cats. Successful placement of the SUB device was achieved in all cats with only one major intraoperative complication (kinking of the kidney catheter) and one minor intraoperative complication (misplacement of the kidney catheter). Eleven SUB cats recovered from the surgical procedure; two SUB cats and three C cats died during the anaesthesia recovery period. Postoperative SUB complications included anaemia (n = 2), urinary tract infection (UTI) (n = 4), non-infectious cystitis (n = 5) and SUB device obstruction (n = 1). Postoperative traditional surgery complications included anaemia (n = 7), UTIs (n = 6), non-infectious cystitis (n = 1), re-obstruction (n = 4) and ureteral stricture (n = 1). Median postoperative duration of hospitalisation (3 days) was significantly shorter for SUB cats than for C cats ( P = 0.013). Ten SUB cats (76.9%) and four C cats (40%) were still alive at a median follow-up of 225 days and 260 days, respectively. Owners were completely (90%) or mostly (10%) satisfied with the SUB device placement. Conclusions and relevance SUB device placement appears to be an effective and safe option for treating ureteral obstruction in cats, and this study has shown that fluoroscopic guidance is not essential in all cases.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1098612X16670572DOI Listing
October 2017

Phase-0/phase-I study of dye-loaded lipid nanoparticles for near-infrared fluorescence imaging in healthy dogs.

Eur J Pharm Biopharm 2016 Mar 8;100:85-93. Epub 2016 Jan 8.

Clinical Oncology Department, Small Animal Internal Medicine Unit, VetAgro Sup Campus Vétérinaire de Lyon, 1 avenue Bourgelat, F-69280 Marcy l'Etoile, France; ICE 2011-03-101 Research Unit, VetAgro Sup Campus Vétérinaire de Lyon, 1 avenue Bourgelat, 69280 Marcy l'Etoile, France.

Near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence imaging using FDA-approved indocyanine green (ICG) has been the subject of numerous studies during the past few years. It could constitute a potentially exciting new paradigm shift in veterinary oncology, especially to develop in vivo fluorescence imaging diagnostics and surgery guidance methods. The objective of this study was to evaluate the pharmacologic and toxicological characteristics in healthy beagle dogs of LipImage™ 815, a formulation made of NIR-dye-loaded lipid nanoparticles. The initial dosage for the evaluation of biodistribution was extrapolated from data in mice and then adapted to define the more adapted dose (MAD) according to the fluorescence results obtained in 5 dogs using a Fluobeam® 800 imaging device (phase 0 study). A single dose acute toxicity study was then performed (3 dogs, phase I study). Before the systemic administration of LipImage™ 815, the dogs presented a very mild residual fluorescence, particularly in the liver and kidneys. After injection, the plasma fluorescence continuously decreased, and the signal was relatively homogeneously distributed throughout the different organs, though more pronounced in the liver and to a lesser extent in the steroid-rich organs (adrenal, ovaries), intestines, lymph nodes and kidneys. A MAD of 2.0μg/kg was found. No evidence of acute or delayed general, hepatic, renal or hematologic toxicity was observed at 1-fold, 5-fold or 10-fold MAD. The results of this phase-0/phase-I study showed that an optimal dosage of LipImage™ 815 of 2.0μg/kg allowed the achievement of a fluorescence signal suitable for surgery guidance application without any acute side effects.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ejpb.2016.01.001DOI Listing
March 2016

Evaluation of intraoperative fluorescence imaging-guided surgery in cancer-bearing dogs: a prospective proof-of-concept phase II study in 9 cases.

Transl Res 2016 Apr 19;170:73-88. Epub 2015 Dec 19.

From the Surgery and Anesthesia Unit, VetAgro-Sup Campus Vétérinaire de Lyon, Marcy l'Etoile, France.

The objective was to prospectively evaluate the application of intraoperative fluorescence imaging (IOFI) in the surgical excision of malignant masses in dogs, using a novel lipid nanoparticle contrast agent. Dogs presenting with spontaneous soft-tissue sarcoma or subcutaneous tumors were prospectively enrolled. Clinical staging and whole-body computed tomography (CT) were performed. All the dogs received an intravenous injection of dye-loaded lipid nanoparticles, LipImage 815. Wide or radical resection was realized after CT examination. Real-time IOFI was performed before skin incision and after tumor excision. In cases of radical resection, the lymph nodes (LNs) were imaged. The margin/healthy tissues fluorescence ratio or LN/healthy tissues fluorescence ratio was measured and compared with the histologic margins or LN status. Nine dogs were included. Limb amputation was performed in 3 dogs, and wide resection in 6. No adverse effect was noted. Fluorescence was observed in all 9 of the tumors. The margins were clean in 5 of 6 dogs after wide surgical resection, and the margin/healthy tissues fluorescence ratio was close to 1.0 in all these dogs. Infiltrated margins were observed in 1 case, with a margin/healthy tissues fluorescence ratio of 3.2. Metastasis was confirmed in 2 of 3 LNs, associated with LN/healthy tissues fluorescence ratios of 2.1 and 4.2, whereas nonmetastatic LN was associated with a ratio of 1.0. LipImage 815 used as a contrast agent during IOFI seemed to allow for good discrimination between tumoral and healthy tissues. Future studies are scheduled to evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of IOFI using LipImage 815 as a tracer.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.trsl.2015.12.001DOI Listing
April 2016

Thoracic bite trauma in dogs and cats: a retrospective study of 65 cases.

Vet Comp Orthop Traumatol 2015 18;28(6):448-54. Epub 2015 Sep 18.

Dr. Claude Carozzo, Surgery Department, VetAgro Sup Campus, Vétérinaire de Lyon, 1 Avenue Claude Bourgelat, 69280 Marcy l'Etoile, France, Phone: +33 6 60 17 22 95, E-mail:

Objectives: To report a case series of thoracic bite trauma in dogs and cats and to evaluate risk factors for mortality.

Methods: A retrospective study concerning thoracic bite wounds in dogs and cats was performed. Lesions were categorized by depth of penetration: no wound, superficial, deep or penetrating. Thoracic radiographic reports were reviewed. Lesion management was classified as non-surgical, wound exploration, or explorative thoracotomy.

Results: Sixty-five cases were collected. Twenty-two percent of patients with normal respiratory patterns showed thoracic radiographic lesions. Respiratory distress was not correlated with mortality. Twenty-eight patients were presented with superficial wounds and 13 with deep wounds. Eight patients exhibited penetrating wounds. Radiographic lesions were observed in 77% of dogs and 100% of cats. Explorative thoracotomy was performed in 28% of patients, and surgical wound exploration in 17.2%. With the exception of skin wounds, thoracic wall discontinuity was the most frequent lesion. Thoracotomy was associated with increased length of hospitalisation but was not correlated with mortality. The mortality rate was 15.4%. No studied factor correlated with mortality, and the long-term outcomes were excellent.

Clinical Significance: A penetrating injury, more than three radiographic lesions, or both together seemed to be indicative of the need for a thoracotomy. In the absence of these criteria, systematic bite wound explorative surgery is recommended, with extension to thoracotomy if thoracic body wall disruption is observed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3415/VCOT-15-01-0001DOI Listing
September 2016

Digital flexor tendon contracture treated by tenectomy: different clinical presentations in three cats.

JFMS Open Rep 2015 Jul-Dec;1(2):2055116915597237. Epub 2015 Jul 27.

DMV Veterinary Centre, Montréal (Lachine), Québec, Canada.

Case Series Summary: Three cats, Siamese or Siamese cross, were presented with a chronic thoracic limb weightbearing lameness. Previous anti-inflammatory administrations were unable to improve lameness consistently in the three cats. Two of the three cats had undergone onychectomy several years before presentation. A permanent flexion of the proximal interphalangeal joint of one or more digits, associated with a difficult and painful extension of the proximal interphalangeal joint, was noticed during orthopedic examination. A digital flexor tendon contracture was suspected and confirmed with radiographic examination. Surgical exploration was then performed. For all cats, treatment consisted of a tenectomy or tenotomy of the superficial and deep digital flexor tendons in order to release the contracture. The three cats responded well to the surgical treatment and became sound around 2-4 weeks after surgery.

Relevance And Novel Information: Digital flexor tendon contracture is rarely reported as a cause of lameness in cats. It should be considered in a differential diagnosis of feline lameness whenever onychectomy has been performed in the past. The precise etiology that explains this tendon contracture is unknown, but trauma or breed predisposition could represent potential causes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/2055116915597237DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5362020PMC
July 2015

MMP-2 as an early synovial biomarker for cranial cruciate ligament disease in dogs.

Vet Comp Orthop Traumatol 2014 25;27(3):210-5. Epub 2014 Mar 25.

Laetitia Boland, 12, Rue de L'Abbé Lemire, 59110 La Madeleine, France, Phone: +33 6 33 24 51 54, E-mail:

Objectives: To measure the activity of matrix metalloproteinases (MMP)-2 and -9 in synovial fluid from the stifle joints of dogs with cranial cruciate ligament (CrCL) rupture and to compare that to values from contralateral stifle joints and dogs with clinically normal stifle joints. Additionally, the C-reactive protein (CRP) levels were also measured.

Methods: Fourteen large breed dogs with unilateral CrCL rupture and 11 large breed normal dogs were included in this prospective clinical study. Synovial fluid was collected from CrCL-ruptured stifle joints, contralateral clinically normal stifle joints of the same dogs, and stifle joints of normal dogs. Serum was also collected. Synovial fluid activities of MMP-2 and MMP-9 and serum CRP level were measured.

Results: The MMP-2 activity in synovial fluid was significantly higher in CrCL-ruptured joints compared to contralateral joints and to stifles from normal dogs. There was no significant difference in activity of MMP-2 in contralateral joints of CrCL-ruptured dogs compared to normal dogs. Both serum CRP level and MMP-9 activity did not differ significantly between the studied conditions.

Clinical Significance: It was confirmed that MMP-2 activity is significantly related to CrCL rupture, but there was a failure to demonstrate any significant increase in the contralateral joints compared to the stifle joints of normal dogs. The MMP-2 involvement in progressing CrCL disease still has to be defined.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3415/VCOT-13-06-0082DOI Listing
January 2015

Iliopsoas muscle injury in dogs.

Compend Contin Educ Vet 2013 May;35(5):E2

Centre Vétérinaire DMV, Montréal, Quebec, Canada.

The iliopsoas muscle is formed by the psoas major and iliacus muscles. Due to its length and diameter, the iliopsoas muscle is an important flexor and stabilizer of the hip joint and the vertebral column. Traumatic acute and chronic myopathies of the iliopsoas muscle are commonly diagnosed by digital palpation during the orthopedic examination. Clinical presentations range from gait abnormalities, lameness, and decreased hip joint extension to irreversible fibrotic contracture of the muscle. Rehabilitation of canine patients has to take into account the inciting cause, the severity of pathology and the presence of muscular imbalances.
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May 2013