Publications by authors named "Putu Eka Sudaryatma"

10 Publications

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Bovine respiratory coronavirus enhances bacterial adherence by upregulating expression of cellular receptors on bovine respiratory epithelial cells.

Vet Microbiol 2021 Apr 17;255:109017. Epub 2021 Feb 17.

Department of Veterinary Science, Faculty of Agriculture, University of Miyazaki, Miyazaki, 889-2192, Japan; Graduate School of Medicine and Veterinary Medicine, University of Miyazaki, Miyazaki, 889-2192, Japan; Center for Animal Disease Control, University of Miyazaki, Miyazaki, 889-2192, Japan. Electronic address:

Bovine coronavirus (BCoV) is one of the agents causing bovine respiratory disease complex (BRDC), with single infection tending to be mild to moderate; the probability of developing pneumonia in BRDC may be affected by viral and bacterial combinations. Previously, we reported that bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) infection enhances adherence of Pasteurella multocida (PM) to cells derived from the bovine lower respiratory tract but that BRSV infection in cells derived from the upper respiratory tract reduces PM adherence. In this study, we sought to clarify whether the modulation of bacterial adherence to cells derived from the bovine upper and lower respiratory tract is shared by other BRDC-related viruses by infecting bovine epithelial cells from the trachea, bronchus and lung with BCoV and/or PM. The results showed that cells derived from both the upper and lower respiratory tract were susceptible to BCoV infection. Furthermore, all cells infected with BCoV exhibited increased PM adherence via upregulation of two major bacterial adhesion molecules, intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and platelet-activating factor receptor (PAF-R), suggesting that compared with BRSV infection, BCoV infection differentially modulates bacterial adherence. In summary, we identified distinct interaction between bovine respiratory viruses and bacterial infections.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.vetmic.2021.109017DOI Listing
April 2021

Pseudorabies virus infection in hunting dogs in Oita, Japan: Report from a prefecture free from Aujeszky's disease in domestic pigs.

J Vet Med Sci 2021 Apr 15;83(4):680-684. Epub 2021 Feb 15.

Centre for Animal Disease Control, University of Miyazaki, 1-1 Gakuen Kibanadai-nishi, Miyazaki 889-2192, Japan.

We isolated two pseudorabies virus (PRV) isolates (designated OT-1 and OT-2) from two hunting dogs exhibiting neurological manifestations after eating the flesh of wild boar hunted in Oita prefecture, Kyushu Island, Japan. The isolates corresponded to a previously reported PRV (MY-1 strain) isolated from a hunting dog in neighboring Miyazaki prefecture, and it clustered into genotype II based on the glycoprotein C sequence. Our results suggest that this common PRV strain may have been maintained in wild boars on Kyushu Island even though domestic pigs in this area have attained an Aujeszky's disease-free status.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1292/jvms.20-0450DOI Listing
April 2021

Seroprevalence of Severe Fever with Thrombocytopenia Syndrome Virus in Small-Animal Veterinarians and Nurses in the Japanese Prefecture with the Highest Case Load.

Viruses 2021 02 2;13(2). Epub 2021 Feb 2.

Center for Animal Disease Control, University of Miyazaki, Miyazaki 889-2192, Japan.

Severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome virus (SFTSV) is the causative agent of SFTS, an emerging tick-borne disease in East Asia, and is maintained in enzootic cycles involving ticks and a range of wild animal hosts. Direct transmission of SFTSV from cats and dogs to humans has been identified in Japan, suggesting that veterinarians and veterinary nurses involved in small-animal practice are at occupational risk of SFTSV infection. To characterize this risk, we performed a sero-epidemiological survey in small-animal-practice workers and healthy blood donors in Miyazaki prefecture, which is the prefecture with the highest per capita number of recorded cases of SFTS in Japan. Three small-animal-practice workers were identified as seropositive by ELISA, but one had a negative neutralization-test result and so was finally determined to be seronegative, giving a seropositive rate of 2.2% (2 of 90), which was significantly higher than that in healthy blood donors (0%, 0 of 1000; < 0.05). The seroprevalence identified here in small-animal-practice workers was slightly higher than that previously reported in other high-risk workers engaged in agriculture and forestry in Japan. Thus, enhancement of small-animal-practice workers' awareness of biosafety at animal hospitals is necessary for control of SFTSV.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/v13020229DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7912989PMC
February 2021

Isolation of Severe Fever with Thrombocytopenia Syndrome Virus from Various Tick Species in Area with Human Severe Fever with Thrombocytopenia Syndrome Cases.

Vector Borne Zoonotic Dis 2021 Feb 3. Epub 2021 Feb 3.

Department of Veterinary Sciences, Faculty of Agriculture, University of Miyazaki, Miyazaki, Japan.

Severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome (SFTS), caused by , generally called SFTS virus (SFTSV), is an emerging zoonosis in East Asia. In Japan, 50-100 cases of SFTS have been reported each year since the first case was reported in 2013. SFTS is a tick-borne infectious disease, and SFTSV has been isolated from ticks in China and South Korea. and are considered the primary vectors in Japan. However, the other tick species seldom feeding on humans might also play an important role in maintaining the virus in nature. In this study, we collected ticks on vegetation around the location where two SFTS patients were estimated to have been infected in Miyazaki Prefecture, Japan, isolated live SFTSV, and performed a phylogenetic analysis. A total of 257 ticks were collected, and SFTSV RNA was detected in 19.5% (9/46) of tick pools. A total of 10 infectious SFTSVs were successfully isolated from , , , , and . Furthermore, the whole viral sequences isolated from ticks were highly homologous to sequences isolated from SFTS patients in the same sampling area in the past. These results suggest that SFTSVs are maintained in these tick species in the sampling area and sporadically transmitted to humans. Surveillance of SFTSV in ticks provides important information about the risk of incidental transmission to humans.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/vbz.2020.2720DOI Listing
February 2021

Bovine Respiratory Syncytial Virus Enhances the Adherence of to Bovine Lower Respiratory Tract Epithelial Cells by Upregulating the Platelet-Activating Factor Receptor.

Front Microbiol 2020 31;11:1676. Epub 2020 Jul 31.

Graduate School of Medicine and Veterinary Medicine, University of Miyazaki, Miyazaki, Japan.

Coinfection by bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) and (PM) frequently has been observed in cattle that develop severe pneumonia. We recently reported that BRSV infection significantly increased PM adherence to bovine lower respiratory tract epithelial cells. However, the molecular mechanisms of enhanced PM adherence are not completely understood. To investigate whether BRSV infection regulates any cellular adherence receptors on bovine bronchus- and lung-epithelial cells, we performed proteomic and functional analyses. The proteomic analysis showed that BRSV infection increased the accumulation of the platelet-activating factor receptor (PAFR) in both cell types. Molecular experiments, including specific blockade, knockdown, and overexpression of PAFR, indicated that PM adherence to these cell types depended on PAFR expression. These findings highlight the role, in cattle with severe pneumonia, of the synergistic effect of coinfection by BRSV and PM in the lower respiratory tract.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fmicb.2020.01676DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7411089PMC
July 2020

Bovine Respiratory Syncytial Virus Decreased Pasteurella multocida Adherence by Downregulating the Expression of Intercellular Adhesion Molecule-1 on the Surface of Upper Respiratory Epithelial Cells.

Vet Microbiol 2020 Jul 2;246:108748. Epub 2020 Jun 2.

Graduate School of Medicine and Veterinary Medicine, University of Miyazaki, Miyazaki, Japan; Department of Veterinary Science, Faculty of Agriculture, University of Miyazaki, Miyazaki, Japan; Center for Animal Disease Control, University of Miyazaki, Miyazaki, Japan. Electronic address:

The synergistic infection of bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) and Pasteurella multocida (PM) may predispose cattle to develop severe pneumonia. Previously, we reported that BRSV infection significantly decreased PM adherence to the upper respiratory epithelial cells. It may allow bacteria to invade into the lower respiratory tract and lead to severe pneumonia. To investigate whether BRSV infection regulates the cell surface adherence receptor on bovine trachea epithelial cells (bTECs), we performed proteomic and functional analyses. BRSV infection decreased the expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM1) on bTECs. Inhibition and knockdown experiments using anti-ICAM1 antibody and siRNAs targeting ICAM1 indicated that PM adherence to bTECs was dependent on ICAM1 expression. These data suggest that under normal conditions bTECs may capture PM in the upper respiratory tract, while BRSV infection reverses this mechanism. The proposed gateway function of bTECs is disrupted by BRSV infection that may facilitate bacterial invasion into the lower respiratory tract and lead to secondary or more severe respiratory infection.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.vetmic.2020.108748DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7265823PMC
July 2020

Molecular epidemiological survey and phylogenetic analysis of bovine respiratory coronavirus in Japan from 2016 to 2018.

J Vet Med Sci 2020 Jun 9;82(6):726-730. Epub 2020 Apr 9.

Center for Animal Disease Control, University of Miyazaki, Miyazaki 889-2192, Japan.

Bovine coronavirus (BCoV) is an etiological agent of bovine respiratory disease (BRD). BRD is a costly illness worldwide; thus, epidemiological surveys of BCoV are important. Here, we conducted a molecular epidemiological survey of BCoV in respiratory-diseased and healthy cattle in Japan from 2016 to 2018. We found that 21.2% (58/273) of the respiratory-diseased cattle were infected with BCoV. The respiratory-diseased cattle had virus amounts 4.7 times higher than those in the asymptomatic cattle. Phylogenetic analyses showed that the BCoV identified in Japan after 2005 formed an individual lineage that was distinct from the strains found in other countries. These results suggest that BCoV is epidemic and has evolved uniquely in Japan.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1292/jvms.19-0587DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7324836PMC
June 2020

Co-infection of epithelial cells established from the upper and lower bovine respiratory tract with bovine respiratory syncytial virus and bacteria.

Vet Microbiol 2019 Aug 12;235:80-85. Epub 2019 Jun 12.

Department of Veterinary Science, Faculty of Agriculture, University of Miyazaki, Miyazaki, Japan; Center for Animal Disease Control, University of Miyazaki, Miyazaki, Japan. Electronic address:

Bovine respiratory disease complex is a major disease affecting the global cattle industry. Multiple infections by viruses and bacteria increase disease severity. Previously, we reported that bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) infection increases adherence of Pasteurella multocida to human respiratory and bovine kidney epithelial cells. To examine the interaction between the virus and bacteria in bovine respiratory cells, we generated respiratory epithelial cell lines from bovine trachea (bTEC), bronchus (bBEC), and lung (bLEC). Although all established cell lines were infected by BRSV and P. multocida susceptibility differed according to site of origin. The cells derived from the lower respiratory tract (bBEC and bLEC) were significantly more susceptible to BRSV than those derived from the upper respiratory tract (bTEC). Pre-infection of bBEC and bLEC with BRSV increased adherence of P. multocida; this was not the case for bTEC. These results indicate that BRSV may reproduce better in the lower respiratory tract and encourage adherence of bacteria. Thus, we identify one possible mechanism underlying severe pneumonia.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.vetmic.2019.06.010DOI Listing
August 2019

Genotyping of swine Mycobacterium avium subsp. hominissuis isolates from Kyushu, Japan.

J Vet Med Sci 2019 Aug 3;81(8):1074-1079. Epub 2019 Jun 3.

Laboratory of Veterinary Microbiology, Department of Veterinary Science, Faculty of Agriculture, University of Miyazaki, 1-1 Gakuenkibanadai Nishi, Miyazaki, Miyazaki 889-2192, Japan.

The incidence of diseases caused by nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) is increasing annually worldwide, including Japan. Mycobacterium avium subsp. hoiminissuis (MAH) is one of the most common NTM species responsible for chronic lung diseases in animals and humans. In the current study, mycobacterial interspersed repetitive unit-variable number tandem repeat (MIRU-VNTR) typing was employed to characterize the genetic diversity of swine MAH isolates from Kyushu, Japan. In total, 309 isolates were obtained from the lymph nodes of 107 pigs not displaying any clinical signs of disease, of which 307 were identified as MAH, comprising 173 strains. Based on eight established MIRU-VNTR loci, the MAH strains represented 50 genotypes constituting three lineages, and 29 had not been described in the Mac French National Institute for Agricultural Research Nouzilly MIRU-VNTR (Mac-INMV) database. MAH was the dominant M. avium complex (MAC) in pigs from Kyushu, and there was high genetic diversity among genotype profiles of MAH from Kyushu. We identified three predominant genotype profiles in the tested area sharing high relatedness with genotype profiles of strains isolated in European countries. MAH was the most common NTM in pigs from Kyushu and exhibited high diversity, with new strain-derived genotypes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1292/jvms.19-0048DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6715914PMC
August 2019

Bovine respiratory syncytial virus infection enhances Pasteurella multocida adherence on respiratory epithelial cells.

Vet Microbiol 2018 Jul 30;220:33-38. Epub 2018 Apr 30.

Department of Veterinary Science, Faculty of Agriculture, University of Miyazaki, Miyazaki, Japan; Center for Animal Disease Control, University of Miyazaki, Miyazaki, Japan. Electronic address:

Primary infection with bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) predisposes cattle to secondary infection with bacteria that cause bovine respiratory disease complex (BRDC). However, the interaction between BRSV and bacteria is unclear. This in vitro study examined the adherence of Pasteurella multocida (PM) to BRSV-infected cells was assessed in colony forming unit assays, by flow cytometry analysis, and by indirect immunofluorescence analysis (IFA) of epithelial cells (A549, HEp-2, and MDBK). An in vitro model based on infection of BRSV-infected epithelial cells revealed that PM adherence to BRSV-infected cells was 2- to 8-fold higher than uninfected cells. This was confirmed by flow cytometry analysis and IFA. Epithelial cell expression of mRNA encoding cytokines and chemokines increased after exposure to PM, but increased further after co-infection with BRSV and PM. BRSV-mediated adherence of PM to epithelial cells may underlie the serious symptoms of BRDC.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.vetmic.2018.04.031DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7117154PMC
July 2018