Publications by authors named "Puja Srivastava"

12 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Characterization and Mapping of Spot Blotch in Introgression Lines Using SNP Markers.

Front Plant Sci 2021 28;12:650400. Epub 2021 May 28.

School of Agricultural Biotechnology, Punjab Agricultural University, Ludhiana, India.

Spot blotch (SB) of wheat is emerging as a major threat to successful wheat production in warm and humid areas of the world. SB, also called leaf blight, is caused by , and is responsible for high yield losses in Eastern Gangetic Plains Zone in India. More recently, SB is extending gradually toward cooler, traditional wheat-growing North-Western part of the country which is a major contributor to the national cereal basket. Deployment of resistant cultivars is considered as the most economical and ecologically sound measure to avoid losses due to this disease. In the present study, 89 backcross introgression lines (DSBILs) derived from (cv. PDW274-susceptible) × (resistant) were evaluated against SB for four consecutive years, 2016-2020. Phenotypic evaluation of these lines showed a continuous variation in disease severity indicating that the resistance to SB is certainly quantitative in nature. Phenotypic data of DSBILs were further used for mapping QTLs using SNPs obtained by genotyping by sequencing. To identify QTLs stable across the environments, Best Linear Unbiased Estimates (BLUEs) and Predictions (BLUPs) were used for mapping QTLs based on stepwise regression-based Likelihood Ratio Test (RSTEP-LRT) for additive effect of markers and single marker analysis (SMA). Five QTLs, , , , , and , linked to SB resistance were mapped across chromosomes 2A, 2B, 3B, 5B, and 6A. Genes found adjacent to the SNP markers linked to these QTLs were literature mined to identify possible candidate genes by studying their role in plant pathogenesis. Further, highly resistant DSBIL (DSBIL-13) was selected to cross with a susceptible hexaploidy cultivar (HD3086) generating BCF population. The QTL , linked to SNP S5B_703858864, was validated on this BCF population and thus, may prove to be a potential diagnostic marker for SB resistance.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fpls.2021.650400DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8193842PMC
May 2021

Hydrogen peroxide regulates antioxidant responses and redox related proteins in drought stressed wheat seedlings.

Physiol Mol Biol Plants 2021 Jan 1;27(1):151-163. Epub 2021 Feb 1.

Department of Plant Breeding and Genetics, Punjab Agricultural, University, Ludhiana, 141004 India.

Hydrogen peroxide plays pivotal role as a potent regulator in signalling pathways when the plant is under stress. The current study appraised the potential of hydrogen peroxide through seed pre-treatment on the seedling growth and defense responses of three wheat cultivars i.e. PBW 644 (tolerant), PBW 621 and HD 2967 (sensitive) grown under drought stress. Imposition of drought stress reduced seedling growth of all the three wheat cultivars. Pre-treatment of seeds with 60 mM HO alleviated water stress induced growth inhibition in all the three wheat cultivars. Further, it enhanced the drought tolerance of PBW 644 by upregulating SOD, POX, APX and GR enzymes accompanied by an increase in total phenols and ascorbate content. HO treatment also protected the sensitive cultivars from drought stress by increasing CAT, POX, APX, MDHAR and GR enzymes. The contents of osmolytes were comparable or slightly higher as compared to stressed seedlings. The levels of MDA content were reduced in the treated seedlings of all the cultivars which further revealed the role of HO pre-treatment in alleviating membrane damage. The comprehensive scrutiny of proteins differentially expressed in control, stressed and HO primed stressed seedlings revealed that drought stress enhanced the expression of proteins involved in photosynthesis, protein biosynthesis and degradation, carbohydrate metabolism, fatty acid metabolism, nucleic acid metabolism, phytohormone response, defense and regulation, whereas HO pre-treatment led to over expression of proteins which had functions in processes such as defense, redox homeostasis and photosynthesis.

Supplementary Information: The online version of this article (10.1007/s12298-021-00937-z).
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12298-021-00937-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7873167PMC
January 2021

Resurrection of Wheat Cultivar PBW343 Using Marker-Assisted Gene Pyramiding for Rust Resistance.

Front Plant Sci 2021 11;12:570408. Epub 2021 Feb 11.

Indian Institute of Wheat & Barley Research, Karnal, India.

Wheat variety PBW343, released in India in 1995, became the most widely grown cultivar in the country by the year 2000 owing to its wide adaptability and yield potential. It initially succumbed to leaf rust, and resistance genes and were transferred to PBW343. After an unbroken reign of about 10 years, the virulence against gene made PBW343 susceptible to stripe rust. Owing to its wide adaptability and yield potential, PBW343 became the prime target for marker-assisted introgression of stripe rust resistance genes. The leaf rust-resistant versions formed the base for pyramiding stripe rust resistance genes , and , in different introgression programs. Advanced breeding lines with different gene combinations, PBW665, PBW683, PBW698, and PBW703 were tested in national trials but could not be released as varieties. The genes from alien segments, () and (), were later pyramided in PBW343. Modified marker-assisted backcross breeding was performed, and 81.57% of the genetic background was recovered in one of the selected derivative lines, PBW723. This line was evaluated in coordinated national trials and was released for cultivation under timely sown irrigated conditions in the North Western Plain Zone of India. PBW723 yields an average of 58.0 qtl/ha in Punjab with high potential yields. The genes incorporated are susceptible to stripe rust individually, but PBW723 with both genes showed enhanced resistance. Three years post-release, PBW723 occupies approximately 8-9% of the cultivated area in the Punjab state. A regular inflow of diverse resistant genes, their rapid mobilization to most productive backgrounds, and keeping a close eye on pathogen evolution is essential to protect the overall progress for productivity and resistance in wheat breeding, thus helping breeders to keep pace with pathogen evolution.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fpls.2021.570408DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7905314PMC
February 2021

Genome-wide association analysis of Mexican bread wheat landraces for resistance to yellow and stem rust.

PLoS One 2021 29;16(1):e0246015. Epub 2021 Jan 29.

International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center (CIMMYT), El Batán, Texcoco, Mexico.

Deploying under-utilized landraces in wheat breeding has been advocated to accelerate genetic gains in current era of genomics assisted breeding. Mexican bread wheat landraces (Creole wheats) represent an important resource for the discovery of novel alleles including disease resistance. A core set of 1,098 Mexican landraces was subjected to multi-location testing for rust diseases in India, Mexico and Kenya. The landrace core set showed a continuous variation for yellow (YR) and stem rust (SR) disease severity. Principal component analysis differentiated Mexican landraces into three groups based on their respective collection sites. Linkage disequilibrium (LD) decay varied from 10 to 32 Mb across chromosomes with an averge of 23Mb across whole genome. Genome-wide association analysis revealed marker-trait associations for YR resistance in India and Mexico as well as for SR resistance in Kenya. In addition, significant additive-additive interaction effects were observed for both YR and SR resistance including genomic regions on chromosomes 1BL and 3BS, which co-locate with pleiotropic genes Yr29/Lr46/Sr58/Pm39/Ltn2 and Sr2/Yr30/Lr27, respectively. Study reports novel genomic associations for YR (chromosomes 1AL, 2BS, and 3BL) and SR (chromosomes 2AL, 4DS, and 5DS). The novel findings in Creole wheat landraces can be efficiently utilized for the wheat genetic improvement.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0246015PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7846011PMC
January 2021

Harnessing genetic potential of wheat germplasm banks through impact-oriented-prebreeding for future food and nutritional security.

Sci Rep 2018 08 21;8(1):12527. Epub 2018 Aug 21.

ICAR-Indian Agricultural Research Institute, Regional Station, Shimla, 171004, India.

The value of exotic wheat genetic resources for accelerating grain yield gains is largely unproven and unrealized. We used next-generation sequencing, together with multi-environment phenotyping, to study the contribution of exotic genomes to 984 three-way-cross-derived (exotic/elite1//elite2) pre-breeding lines (PBLs). Genomic characterization of these lines with haplotype map-based and SNP marker approaches revealed exotic specific imprints of 16.1 to 25.1%, which compares to theoretical expectation of 25%. A rare and favorable haplotype (GT) with 0.4% frequency in gene bank identified on chromosome 6D minimized grain yield (GY) loss under heat stress without GY penalty under irrigated conditions. More specifically, the 'T' allele of the haplotype GT originated in Aegilops tauschii and was absent in all elite lines used in study. In silico analysis of the SNP showed hits with a candidate gene coding for isoflavone reductase IRL-like protein in Ae. tauschii. Rare haplotypes were also identified on chromosomes 1A, 6A and 2B effective against abiotic/biotic stresses. Results demonstrate positive contributions of exotic germplasm to PBLs derived from crosses of exotics with CIMMYT's best elite lines. This is a major impact-oriented pre-breeding effort at CIMMYT, resulting in large-scale development of PBLs for deployment in breeding programs addressing food security under climate change scenarios.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-018-30667-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6104032PMC
August 2018

Rht8 gene as an alternate dwarfing gene in elite Indian spring wheat cultivars.

PLoS One 2018 21;13(6):e0199330. Epub 2018 Jun 21.

Department of Plant Breeding and Genetics, Punjab Agricultural University, Ludhiana, Punjab, India.

Optimizing wheat height to maximize yield has been an important aspect which is evident from a successful example of green revolution. Dwarfing genes (Rht) are known for yield gains due to lodging resistance and partitioning of assimilates into ear. The available and commercially exploited sources of dwarfism in Indian spring wheat are Rht1 and Rht2 genes inspite of availability of over 20 dwarfing genes. Rht8 a Gibberellic acid sensitive dwarfing gene is another reduced height gene commercially exploited in some Mediterranean countries. Two F2 populations segregating for Rht1 and Rht8 genes with each comprising 398 and 379 plants were developed by crossing European winter wheat cultivars Beauchamp and Capitole with Indian spring wheat cultivar PBW 621. Different genotypic combinations for Rht1 and Rht8 genes were selected from these populations through linked molecular markers and selected F3:4 lines were evaluated for various agronomic traits in a replicated trial. Reduction in plant height with Rht8 and Rht1 averaged 2.86% and 13.3% respectively as compared to the group of lines lacking dwarfing gene. Reduction was spread along all the internodes of wheat culm and reduction was lower as progress towards the lower internode. Grain number per spike and highest yield was observed in lines carrying only Rht1 gene. Reduction in plant biomass was observed with either of the dwarfing gene. Longest coleoptile length and seedling shoot length averaged 4.4 ± 0.09 cm and 19.5 ± 0.48, respectively was observed in lines lacking any of the dwarfing gene. Negligible reduction of 6.75% and 2.84% in coleoptile length and seedling shoot length, respectively was observed in lines carrying only Rht8 gene whereas F3:4 lines with Rht1 gene showed 21.64% and 23.35% reduction in coleoptile length and seedling shoot length, respectively. Additive effect of genes was observed as double dwarfs showed 43.31% and 43.34% reduction in coleoptile length and seedling shoot length.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0199330PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6013103PMC
April 2019

Serum BAFF in Indian patients with IIM: a retrospective study reveals novel clinico-phenotypic associations in children and adults.

Clin Rheumatol 2018 May 7;37(5):1265-1271. Epub 2018 Mar 7.

Department of Clinical Immunology, Sanjay Gandhi Postgraduate Institute of Medical Sciences, Lucknow, 226014, India.

We studied the serum levels of B cell survival factors BAFF and APRIL in patients with idiopathic inflammatory myositis (IIM) and their relation with clinical and autoantibodies. Seventy-five patients (51 females and 24 males) with IIM (Bohan and Peter's criteria 1975) and 25 healthy adults were analyzed for BAFF, APRIL and IL-17 by ELISA, and myositis-specific and associated antibodies (MSA and MAA) using line immunoblot assay. Of the 75 patients, 59 were adults, 42 had Dermatomyositis (DM), and 17 had Polymyositis. Median disease duration was 5 (3-12) months. BAFF levels were higher in IIM than healthy controls [p = 0.001], and in children with jDM than adults [p = 0.026]. BAFF levels were higher in adults with arthritis [p = 0.018], weight loss [p = 0.007], and PAH [p = 0.004]. Among the various MSAs, lowest levels were seen in those with anti-SRP [p = 0.043]. Median follow-up duration was 145 patient years. Twelve patients relapsed, while nine were in drug-free remission. BAFF were similar between these groups. Serum APRIL levels were elevated in limited number of patients with myositis, and the levels did not differ amongst the clinico-serologic phenotypes. IL-17 levels were higher in individuals positive for anti-SRP [p = 0.028]. Serum BAFF levels are elevated in IIM, more so in children. BAFF levels may be useful as biomarker for PAH and arthritis. Anti-SRP positivity is associated with elevated IL-17 levels suggesting role in pathogenesis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10067-018-4046-xDOI Listing
May 2018

Myositis-specific and myositis-associated autoantibodies in Indian patients with inflammatory myositis.

Rheumatol Int 2016 Jul 14;36(7):935-43. Epub 2016 May 14.

Department of Clinical Immunology, Sanjay Gandhi Post Graduate Institute of Medical Sciences, Lucknow, 226 014, India.

We aimed to study the prevalence and clinical associations of myositis-specific autoantibodies (MSAs) and myositis-associated autoantibodies (MAAs) in a large cohort of Indian patients with idiopathic inflammatory myositis (IIM). Clinical details and serum samples were collected from patients with IIM (satisfying Bohan and Peter Criteria, 1975) and CTD-associated myositis. Sera were analysed for antibodies against SRP, Mi2, Jo1, PL7, PL12, EJ, OJ, Ro52, Ku, Pm-Scl 75 and PM-Scl 100, using immunoblot assay. The cohort comprised 124 patients with IIM (M:F = 1:3.6). Fifty-five of them had dermatomyositis (DM), 22 had juvenile dermatomyositis (JDM), 25 had polymyositis (PM) and 22 had connective tissue disease-associated myositis (CTD myositis). Mean disease duration was 10.9 months. ANA was positive in 84 (68.9 %), and MSAs in 61 (49.2 %) patients. Among MSAs, autoantibodies to Mi2, synthetase (Jo1, PL7, PL12, EJ) and SRP were present in 26 (20.9 %), 29 (23.4 %) and 6 (4.8 %) patients, respectively. Prevalence of MAAs was as follows: antibodies to Ro52 in 45 (36.3 %), Ku and PM-Scl 75 in 13 (10.5 %) and PM-Scl 100 in 5 (4 %) patients. Anti-Mi2 antibodies were positively associated with DM (21/55, 38.2 %; p < 0.0001) and pharyngeal weakness (13/34, 38.2 %; p = 0.004) and negatively associated with ILD (0/28; p = 0.001). ILD and mechanics' hands were significantly more in patients with anti-synthetase antibodies (16/28, 57 % and 14/22, 63.6 %; p < 0.0001). Four of six patients with anti-SRP antibody showed poor response to multiple drugs. Higher prevalence of anti-Mi2 is probably related to higher proportion of patients with DM. Absence of ILD in patients with anti-Mi2 antibody suggests that it may protect against ILD. In Indian population also, anti-synthetase antibodies are associated with ILD, and anti-SRP antibodies with poor response to treatment.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00296-016-3494-3DOI Listing
July 2016

Ultrasound-guided retro-calcaneal bursa corticosteroid injection for refractory Achilles tendinitis in patients with seronegative spondyloarthropathy: efficacy and follow-up study.

Rheumatol Int 2016 Jun 19;36(6):875-80. Epub 2016 Feb 19.

Department of Clinical Immunology, Sanjay Gandhi Post Graduate Institute of Medical Sciences, Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh, 226 014, India.

Ultrasound (US)-guided corticosteroid injection has been shown to be safe and effective for varied causes of plantar fasciitis; however, its use for Achilles tendinitis is controversial. We studied the efficacy and changes in US findings at Achilles enthesitis after corticosteroid injection in patients with spondyloarthropathy (SpA). Patients with SpA with symptomatic Achilles enthesitis, refractory to 6 weeks of full-dose NSAIDs, were offered US-guided local corticosteroid injection. Injected entheses were examined by US (both B mode and power Doppler) at baseline and 6 weeks after injection. Standard OMERACT definitions were used to define enthesitis. Achilles tendon thickness >5.29 mm, 2 cm proximal to insertion in long axis, was considered thickened. Twenty-seven symptomatic Achilles tendons (in 18 patients) were injected with 20 mg methylprednisolone under US guidance baseline, and 6-week follow-up US features were compared. All patients reported improvement in pain (VAS) in the affected tendon after injection (p < 0.0001). Simultaneously, improvement in local inflammatory changes were noted, in the form of significant reduction in tendon thickness (p < 0.0001), vascularity (p < 0.0001), peritendinous oedema (p = 0.001), bursitis and bursal vascularity (p < 0.001 and < 0.0001, respectively). There was no change in bone erosions and enthesophyte. None of the patients had tendon rupture or other injection-related complications at 6 weeks of follow-up. US-guided local corticosteroid injection is an effective and safe modality for refractory Achilles enthesitis in patients with SpA and leads to reversion of acute changes at entheseal site.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00296-016-3440-4DOI Listing
June 2016

Childhood onset systemic lupus erythematosus: how is it different from adult SLE?

Int J Rheum Dis 2015 Feb 26;18(2):182-91. Epub 2014 Jun 26.

Department of Clinical Immunology, Sanjay Gandhi Postgraduate Institute of Medical Sciences, Lucknow, India.

About 20% of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) starts in childhood and children have less gender bias in favor of females as compared to adults. Systemic manifestations, nephritis, neuro-psychiatric disease and cytopenias are more common in children at presentation than adults. Since most children develop lupus in their early adolescence, dealing with the diagnosis of an unpredictable lifelong disease during this phase of life is challenging. Physicians must recognise specific medical and social needs of this age group, for optimal long-term outcome. Steroids and immunosuppressive drugs are the cornerstone for treatment in children as with adults with lupus. The outcome has improved considerably with these drugs and 10-year survival is nearly 90%. Due to longer life spans more damage accrues in children as compared to adults. Most of the drugs are associated with significant toxicity and the goal of having a drug which reduces disease activity and damage without hampering normal growth, development and fertility is still an elusive one. The current review focuses on clinical and immunological aspects of childhood SLE and how it differs from adulthood SLE.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1756-185X.12419DOI Listing
February 2015

Differential expression of heat shock protein (HSP) 70-2 gene polymorphism in benign and malignant pancreatic disorders and its relationship with disease severity and complications.

JOP 2012 Jul 10;13(4):414-9. Epub 2012 Jul 10.

Department of Internal Medicine, Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research (PGIMER), Chandigarh, India.

Context: The role of heat shock protein (HSP) 70-2 gene polymorphism (at position 1267, A to G transition) in patients with pancreatic disorders is not clear.

Objective: To evaluate HSP 70-2 gene polymorphism (at position 1267, A to G transition) in patients with acute and chronic pancreatitis as well as pancreatic carcinoma, and to find any association of this polymorphism with disease complications and severity.

Methods: One-hundred and fifty patients (50 each of acute, chronic pancreatitis, and pancreatic carcinoma) and 50 healthy blood donors as controls were prospectively studied. Three alleles (AA, AG and GG) of HSP 70-2 gene determined by PstI restriction fragment length polymorphism.

Results: There was a statistically significant difference in the distribution pattern of HSP 70-2 gene polymorphism in patients with acute pancreatitis (P=0.001) and pancreatic carcinoma (P<0.001) as compared to controls. The frequency of mutant allele (G allele) was significantly higher in diseased group as compared to control group (19% in control group, 40% in acute pancreatitis, 33% in chronic pancreatitis and 45% in pancreatic carcinoma). No association of this polymorphism was found with disease severity in patients with acute and chronic pancreatitis or pancreatic carcinoma.

Conclusions: In our patient sample the frequency of mutant allele (G allele) of HSP 70-2 gene is significantly higher in patients with acute pancreatitis and pancreatic carcinoma compared to controls (50 healthy blood donors). However, this polymorphism was not associated with disease severity and complications.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.6092/1590-8577/796DOI Listing
July 2012

Pancreatic enzymes for chronic pancreatitis.

Cochrane Database Syst Rev 2009 Oct 7(4):CD006302. Epub 2009 Oct 7.

Department of Pharmacology, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh, India, 160012.

Background: The efficacy of pancreatic enzymes in reducing pain and improving steatorrhoea is debatable and the evidence base for their utility needs to be determined.

Objectives: To evaluate the efficacy of pancreatic enzymes in patients with chronic pancreatitis. The specific objectives were to compare the following: 1) pancreatic enzyme versus placebo; 2) different pancreatic enzyme preparations and 3) different dosage schedules of the enzyme preparations. We evaluated the following outcomes: change in frequency of abdominal pain, duration of pain episodes, intensity of pain, weight loss, steatorrhoea, faecal fat and quality of life.

Search Strategy: We devised a search strategy to detect all published and unpublished literature and the search included CENTRAL (The Cochrane Library 2009, issue 1), MEDLINE (1965 to February 2009) and EMBASE (1974 to Feburary 2009). We handsearched reference lists and published abstracts from conference proceedings to identify further relevant trials. The date of the last search was April 2009.

Selection Criteria: Randomised controlled trials with or without blinding. We included abstracts or unpublished data if sufficient information was available.

Data Collection And Analysis: Two authors independently extracted and pooled the data pertinent to study outcomes. We combined continuous data using standardised mean difference (SMD) with 95% confidence interval (CI) and calculated the odds ratio (OR) for dichotomous data (95% CI).

Main Results: Ten trials, involving 361 participants, satisfied the inclusion criteria. All the trials were randomised; two had a parallel design while the remainder had a cross-over design. Although some individual studies reported a beneficial effect of pancreatic enzyme over placebo in improving pain, incidence of steatorrhoea and analgesic consumption, the results of the studies could not be pooled for these outcomes. With the use of pancreatic enzymes, we observed a non-significant benefit for weight loss (kg) (SMD 0.06; 95% CI -0.23 to 0.34); a significant reduction in faecal fat (g/day) (SMD -1.03; 95% CI -1.60 to -0.46) and non-significant difference in subjects' Clinical Global Impression of Disease Symptom Scale (SMD -0.63; 95% CI -1.41 to 0.14). We found no significant benefit in reducing faecal fat with any particular schedule of enzyme preparation or type of enzyme.Another small study did not show any significant benefit of timing the administration of enzyme preparations in relation to meals on faecal fat.

Authors' Conclusions: The role of pancreatic enzymes for abdominal pain, weight loss, steatorrhoea, analgesic use and quality of life in patients with chronic pancreatitis remains equivocal. Good quality, adequately powered studies are much warranted.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/14651858.CD006302.pub2DOI Listing
October 2009