Publications by authors named "Priscilla D"

9 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Laboratory validation and field usability assessment of a point-of-care test for serum bilirubin levels in neonates in a tropical setting.

Wellcome Open Res 2018 23;3:110. Epub 2018 Nov 23.

Shoklo Malaria Research Unit, Mahidol-Oxford Tropical Medicine Research Unit, Faculty of Tropical Medicine, Mahidol University, Mae Sot, 63110, Thailand.

Screening and monitoring serum bilirubin (SBR) in neonates is crucial to prevent neonatal hyperbilirubinemia (NH)-associated morbidity and mortality worldwide. A lack of resources is often a barrier for measuring SBR in developing countries. Reliable, cost-effective, easy to use point-of-care (POC) SBR tests are needed. This study aimed to evaluate the technical accuracy and usability of the Bilistick System (BS), a new bilirubin POC test, in a tropical setting. This was a mixed-methods study, including laboratory validation of the BS, direct observation of technical procedures as performed by the midwives and midwives' assessment of the device's easiness of use through focus group discussions (FGD) and a self-administered questionnaire. The study was conducted in a field clinic of the Shoklo Malaria Research Unit along the Thailand-Myanmar border between January and December 2017. A total of 173 samples were tested at a median age of 4 days. BS generated an error message-providing no SBR readout-in 48.6% of the tests performed. For the tests that yielded a result, the correlation coefficient (95% CI) between BS and routine laboratory bilirubinometer SBR was 0.87 (0.77-0.93). The accuracy decreased with increasing haematocrit and at higher humidity (≥75%). Direct observation of the operators using the device and analysis of the focus group discussions and questionnaires indicated that the BS was considered easy to use and required limited training. This evaluation showed that the BS, in its current formulation, does not provide reliable results for measuring SBR in a tropical, low-resource setting  but has acceptable usability features.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.12688/wellcomeopenres.14767.2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6137410PMC
November 2018

Portion controlled ready-to-eat meal replacement is associated with short term weight loss: a randomised controlled trial.

Asia Pac J Clin Nutr 2017;26(6):1055-1065

Division of Nutrition, St John's Research Institute, St John's National Academy of Health Sciences, Bangalore, India.

Background And Objectives: Strategies to prevent and treat overweight/obesity are urgently needed. This study assessed the effect of a short-term intake of ready-to-eat cereal on body weight and waist circumference of overweight/obese individuals in comparison to a control group.

Methods And Study Design: A randomized, controlled 2-arm trial was carried out on 101 overweight/obese (Body Mass Index - 29.2±2.4 kg/m2) females aged 18 to 44 years, at St. John's Medical College Hospital. The intervention group received a low fat, ready to eat cereal, replacing two meals/day for two weeks. The control group was provided with standard dietary guidelines for weight loss and energy requirements for both groups were calculated similarly. Anthropometric, dietary, appetite and health status assessments were carried out at baseline and at the end of two weeks.

Results: At the end of two weeks, the mean reductions in body weight and waist circumference were significantly greater in the intervention group, -0.53 kg; 95% CI (-0.86 to -0.19) for body weight and -1.39 cm; 95% CI (-1.78, -0.99) for waist circumference. The intervention group had a significantly higher increase in dietary intakes of certain vitamins, fiber and sugar, and significantly higher reductions in total and polyunsaturated fats and sodium intakes, as compared to the control group (p<=0.05). No significant differences were observed between the groups, in change of appetite, health and perception scales.

Conclusions: Portion controlled, ready to eat cereal could be effective for short-term weight loss, with some improvements in the nutrient intake profile. However, studies of longer duration are needed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.6133/apjcn.022017.07DOI Listing
August 2019

Naringenin inhibits α-glucosidase activity: a promising strategy for the regulation of postprandial hyperglycemia in high fat diet fed streptozotocin induced diabetic rats.

Chem Biol Interact 2014 Mar 8;210:77-85. Epub 2014 Jan 8.

Structural Biology Lab, Centre for Bio Medical Research, School of Bio Sciences and Technology, VIT University, Vellore 632 014, Tamil Nadu, India. Electronic address:

Obesity and the onset of diabetes are two closely linked medical complications prevalent globally. Postprandial hyperglycemia is one of the earliest abnormalities of glucose homeostasis associated with type 2 diabetes (T2D). Postprandial glucose levels can be regulated through α-glucosidase inhibition. The present study aims to demonstrate the potent inhibitory role of naringenin against α-glucosidase activity. The mode of inhibition of naringenin was examined by measuring enzyme activity in vitro with different concentrations of substrate using Lineweaver-Burk plot analysis. It shows competitive inhibition towards mammalian α-glucosidase thereby competing with α-limit dextrins and oligosaccharide residues for binding in the active site. Similar results have been obtained from the molecular docking analyses, where naringenin shows preferential binding for the active sites in each of the evaluated human intestinal α-glucosidase enzymes. Post-docking intramolecular hydrogen bonding analysis shows water molecule mediated hydrogen bonding for N-terminal maltase glucoamylase and N-terminal sucrase isomaltase. Naringenin's docked pose in the C-terminal maltase glucoamylase active site does not show any particular water mediated interaction similar to the co-crystallized acarbose. Further, our results suggest that naringenin (25 mg/kg) exerts significant inhibition of intestinal α-glucosidase activity in vivo thereby delaying the absorption of carbohydrates in T2D rats, thus resulting in significant lowering of postprandial blood glucose levels. Both in vitro and in vivo results were compared to the commercially available α-glucosidase inhibitor acarbose. Our findings clearly indicate that naringenin dampens postprandial glycemic response and offers a potential complementary approach in the management of T2D.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cbi.2013.12.014DOI Listing
March 2014

The Socio-Demographic and Clinical Factors Associated with Quality of Life among Patients with Haematological Cancer in a Large Government Hospital in Malaysia.

Malays J Med Sci 2011 Jul;18(3):49-56

Department of Community Health, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 UPM Serdang, Selangor, Malaysia.

Background: The paper examined the quality of life of haematological cancer patients according to their socio-demographic profiles and clinical diagnoses.

Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted at the tertiary referral centre of Ampang Hospital, Kuala Lumpur, involving 105 patients. The European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life (EORTC QLQ-C30) questionnaire was used to measure their quality of life.

Results: The study involved patients diagnosed with all types of haematological cancer, including non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), acute myelogenous leukaemia (AML), acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL), Hodgkin lymphoma (HL), and multiple myeloma (MM), with a response rate of 83.3%. The patients with ALL, HL, without NHL, and without MM were younger than other patients. There were significant differences in quality of life scores in different socio-demographic groups and types of cancer diagnosis. The global quality of life of the female patients was much better than that of the male patients. Patients who were 40 years old or younger had a better global quality of life and physical functioning, as well as fewer symptoms of constipation, nausea, and vomiting. Employed patients were in less pain but showed greater impairments of cognitive function than did unemployed patients. Patients who earned a monthly wage of RM1000 or less had reduced physical function, more symptoms of pain, and more financial difficulties compared with patients who earned more. Patients with AML tended to have better physical functioning than did patients with MM, whose physical functioning was impaired. Comparatively, more symptoms of dyspnoea were found in ALL and HL patients than in other types of lymphoma. Compared with other patients, those with ALL had a greater loss of appetite, and other lymphoma patients had fewer symptoms of pain. Patients with NHL had impaired role functioning and more constipation compared with other patients. The results were all statistically significant (P < 0.05).

Conclusion: The quality of life of haematological cancer patients is affected by socio-demographic factors and clinical diagnoses. Efforts should be made to improve the overall quality of life of these patients.
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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3216227PMC
July 2011

Quality of life among patients with hematological cancer in a Malaysian hospital.

Med J Malaysia 2011 Jun;66(2):117-20

Department of Community Health, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 UPM Serdang, Selangor, Malaysia.

The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of symptoms and problems in hospitalized hematological cancer patients. A cross-sectional design was carried out with 105 respondents in Ampang hospital in Kuala Lumpur. The European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality Of Life questionnaire (EORTC QLQ-C30) was used. Patients with a minimum response of "a little" were defined as having a symptom/problem while patients with a response of "quite a bit" were classified as having a "severe symptom/problem". The four most prevalent symptoms/problems identified were fatigue, financial difficulties, reduced role function and reduced social function. Multiple myeloma patients (MM) were identified as having the most symptoms/problems.
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June 2011

Assessment of depression and anxiety in haematological cancer patients and their relationship with quality of life.

East Asian Arch Psychiatry 2011 Sep;21(3):108-14

Department of Community Health, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Universiti Putra Malaysia, Selangor, Malaysia.

Objectives: To determine the relationship between major depressive disorder, anxiety disorders and the quality of life of haematological cancer patients.

Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted at Ampang Hospital Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, a tertiary referral centre hospital for haematological cancer. The Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview was used for the diagnosis of major depressive disorder and anxiety disorders. The European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire was utilised to measure patients' quality of life.

Results: A total of 105 haematological cancer patients were included in the study with response rate of 100%. Major depressive disorder correlated with almost all domains of the quality of life, except the pain scores. Logistic regression showed that insomnia and financial difficulties were related to major depressive disorder. Different anxiety disorders also correlated with quality of life in specific domains. The leading anxiety disorders that correlated mostly with quality-of-life scales were generalised anxiety disorder, followed by obsessive-compulsive disorder, social anxiety disorder, as well as post-traumatic stress disorder and panic disorder with agoraphobia (p<0.05).

Conclusions: Psychological treatment along with medication and intervention should be implemented to improve the overall quality of life and psychiatric disorder symptoms among the haematological cancer patients.
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September 2011

Coping styles in patients with haematological cancer in a Malaysian hospital.

East Asian Arch Psychiatry 2011 Jun;21(2):44-51

Department of Community Health, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Universiti Putra Malaysia, Selangor, Malaysia.

Objective: To assess coping styles of haematological cancer patients and investigate factors (major depressive disorders, socio-demographic profiles and clinical factors) that influence them.

Methods: This was a cross-sectional study conducted at the Ampang Hospital in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, which is a tertiary referral centre for haematological diseases. In all, 105 patients with haematological cancer were assessed using the Brief COPE questionnaire to examine the coping styles of patients, and the Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview to assess major depressive disorder.

Results: The response rate was 83%. The coping strategies used by haematological cancer patients in descending order of frequency were: behavioural disengagement, active coping, denial, venting, self-distraction, substance use, acceptance, humour, use of emotional support, use of instrumental support, religion, positive reframing, planning, and self-blame. The coping styles were found to be associated with major depressive disorder, socio-demographic profiles, and clinical factors. Self-distraction and positive reframing coping styles were significant predictors and related to major depressive disorder.

Conclusion: The early identification of poor coping styles in cancer patients is important, in order to enhance their survival and prevent relapses.
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June 2011

An in vivo and in vitro study on the protective effects of N-acetylcysteine on mitochondrial dysfunction in isoproterenol treated myocardial infarcted rats.

Exp Toxicol Pathol 2013 Jan 8;65(1-2):7-14. Epub 2011 Jun 8.

Department of Biochemistry and Biotechnology, Annamalai University, Annamalai Nagar 608002, Tamil Nadu, India.

Altered mitochondrial function plays an important role in the pathology of myocardial infarction. We investigated the protective effects of N-acetylcysteine on mitochondrial dysfunction in isoproterenol induced myocardial infarcted rats. Rats were pretreated with N-acetylcysteine (10 mg/kg) orally daily for 14 days. After pretreatment, rats were induced myocardial infarction by isoproterenol (100 mg/kg) at an interval of 24 h for 2 days. Lipid peroxidation products, antioxidants, lipids, mitochondrial marker enzymes and calcium in the mitochondrial heart were determined. Transmission electron microscopic and in vitro studies were also done. Isoproterenol treatment caused significant increase in mitochondrial lipid peroxides and lipids except phospholipids with significant decrease in mitochondrial antioxidants. Significant decreased activities of marker enzymes and significant increased calcium were observed in mitochondria of myocardial infarcted rats. Pretreatment with N-acetylcysteine showed significant protective effects on all the biochemical parameters and preserved the integrity of heart tissue and restored normal mitochondrial function in myocardial infarcted rats. Transmission electron microscopic findings on the structure of the heart mitochondria confirmed the protective effects and in vitro study also confirmed the antioxidant potential of NAC. The possible mechanism for the improved cardiac mitochondrial function might be due to scavenging free radicals, improving the antioxidant and mitochondrial marker enzymes, maintaining GSH levels, lipids and Ca(2+) levels by its antioxidant effect. Thus, N-acetylcysteine protected the mitochondrial heart from ISO treated mitochondrial damage. A diet containing N-acetylcysteine may be beneficial to myocardial infarcted heart.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.etp.2011.05.002DOI Listing
January 2013

Cardioprotective effect of gallic acid on cardiac troponin-T, cardiac marker enzymes, lipid peroxidation products and antioxidants in experimentally induced myocardial infarction in Wistar rats.

Chem Biol Interact 2009 May 25;179(2-3):118-24. Epub 2008 Dec 25.

Department of Biochemistry and Biotechnology, Annamalai University, Annamalainagar 608002, Tamil Nadu, India.

Currently there has been an increased interest globally to identify antioxidant compounds that are pharmacologically potent and have low or no side effects for use in preventive medicine. This study was designed to evaluate the protective effect of gallic acid on cardiac marker enzymes, troponin-T, LDH-isoenzyme pattern, lipid peroxidation products and antioxidant status in isoproterenol (ISO)-induced myocardial infarction in male Wistar rats. Male albino Wistar rats were pretreated with gallic acid (15 mg/kg) daily for a period of 10 days. After the treatment period, ISO (100 mg/kg) was subcutaneously injected to rats at an interval of 24 h for 2 days. ISO-induced myocardial damage was indicated by increased activities of marker enzymes such as creatine kinase, creatine kinase-MB, aspartate transaminase, alanine transaminase and lactate dehydrogenase in serum and the levels of troponin-T in the serum. Increased LDH-isoenzyme bands (LDH-1 and LDH-2) were also observed in serum of ISO-induced rats. In addition to these diagnostic markers, the levels of lipid peroxidation products in plasma and the heart were significantly (P<0.05) increased and the activities of enzymic antioxidants such as superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase and glutathione-S-transferase in the heart and non-enzymic antioxidants such as glutathione, vitamin C and E in plasma and the heart were significantly (P<0.05) decreased in ISO-induced rats. The level of uric acid in plasma was significantly (P<0.05) increased in ISO-treated rats. Gallic acid pretreatment showed significant protective effect on all the biochemical parameters studied. Histopathological findings of gallic acid pretreated myocardial infarcted heart confirmed the biochemical findings of this study. Thus, gallic acid protects the myocardium against isoproterenol-induced oxidative stress.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cbi.2008.12.012DOI Listing
May 2009
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