Publications by authors named "Prerana Sensharma"

3 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Low mortality oxidative stress murine chronic wound model.

BMJ Open Diabetes Res Care 2020 09;8(1)

Department of Surgery, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA

Introduction: Investigators have struggled to produce a reliable chronic wound model. Recent progress with antioxidant enzyme inhibitors shows promise, but mortality rates are high. We modified the dosage and administration of an antioxidant enzyme inhibitor regimen to reduce mortality while inducing a chronic wound environment.

Research Design And Methods: To chemically induce a chronic wound environment, we applied modified doses of catalase (3-amino-1,2,4-triazole; intraperitoneal 0.5 g/kg) and glutathione peroxidase (mercaptosuccinic acid; topical 300 mg/kg) inhibitors to the dorsal wounds of 11-week-old db/db mice. A cohort of these mice was treated with a collagen-glycosaminoglycan scaffold. Both groups were compared with Diabetic control mice.

Results: This study successfully induced a chronic wound in 11-week-old db/db mice, with no animal deaths. The antioxidant enzyme treated groups showed delayed wound contraction and significantly higher levels of inflammatory tissue, collagen deposition, cellular proliferation and leukocyte infiltration than the Diabetic control group. Angiogenesis was significantly higher in the antioxidant enzyme treated groups, but the vessels were immature and friable. Scaffold engraftment was poor but appeared to promote blood vessel maturation.

Conclusions: Overall, the two in vivo groups treated with the antioxidant enzyme inhibitors appeared to be arrested in the inflammatory stage of wound healing, while the Diabetic control group progressed to the maturation phase and ultimately remodeling. This model may be instrumental for the development of new wound therapeutics.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmjdrc-2020-001221DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7478002PMC
September 2020

Hydrogel-Embedded Quantum Dot-Transcription Factor Sensors for Quantitative Progesterone Detection.

ACS Appl Mater Interfaces 2020 Sep 18;12(39):43513-43521. Epub 2020 Sep 18.

Department of Biomedical Engineering, Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts 02215, United States.

Immobilization of biosensors in or on a functional material is critical for subsequent device development and translation to wearable technology. Here, we present the development and assessment of an immobilized quantum dot-transcription factor-nucleic acid complex for progesterone detection as a first step toward such device integration. The sensor, composed of a polyhistidine-tagged transcription factor linked to a quantum dot and a fluorophore-modified cognate DNA, is embedded within a hydrogel as an immobilization matrix. The hydrogel is optically transparent, soft, and flexible as well as traps the quantum dot-transcription factor DNA assembly but allows free passage of the analyte, progesterone. Upon progesterone exposure, DNA dissociates from the quantum dot-transcription factor DNA assembly resulting in an attenuated ratiometric fluorescence output Förster resonance energy transfer. The sensor performs in a dose-dependent manner with a limit of detection of 55 nM. Repeated analyte measurements are similarly successful. Our approach combines a systematically characterized hydrogel as an immobilization matrix and a transcription factor-DNA assembly as a recognition/transduction element, offering a promising framework for future biosensor devices.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/acsami.0c13489DOI Listing
September 2020

Biomaterials and cells for neural tissue engineering: Current choices.

Mater Sci Eng C Mater Biol Appl 2017 Aug 30;77:1302-1315. Epub 2017 Mar 30.

Centre for Biomaterials, Cellular and Molecular Theranostics, VIT University, Vellore 632014, Tamilnadu, India. Electronic address:

The treatment of nerve injuries has taken a new dimension with the development of tissue engineering techniques. Prior to tissue engineering, suturing and surgery were the only options for effective treatment. With the advent of tissue engineering, it is now possible to design a scaffold that matches the exact biological and mechanical properties of the tissue. This has led to substantial reduction in the complications posed by surgeries and suturing to the patients. New synthetic and natural polymers are being applied to test their efficiency in generating an ideal scaffold. Along with these, cells and growth factors are also being incorporated to increase the efficiency of a scaffold. Efforts are being made to devise a scaffold that is biodegradable, biocompatible, conducting and immunologically inert. The ultimate goal is to exactly mimic the extracellular matrix in our body, and to elicit a combination of biochemical, topographical and electrical cues via various polymers, cells and growth factors, using which nerve regeneration can efficiently occur.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.msec.2017.03.264DOI Listing
August 2017
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