Publications by authors named "Pranporn Kuropakornpong"

2 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Bactericidal Effect and Anti-Inflammatory Activity of Heartwood Extract.

ScientificWorldJournal 2020 13;2020:1653180. Epub 2020 Jul 13.

Department of Applied Thai Traditional Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Thammasat University, Khlong Nueng, Pathumthani 12120, Thailand.

Natural products are used as alternative drugs in traditional medicine to treat infection and inflammation and relieve pain. Heartwood of Craib has been investigated as an ingredient in Thai traditional medicine for anti-HIV protease, but there is no report on its antibacterial and anti-inflammatory activities. The objectives of this study were to investigate the anti-inflammatory and antibacterial activities, time-kill profile, and main active constituents of an ethanolic extract of heartwood. The study followed the generally accepted experimental design. All tests were investigated in triplicate. The heartwood of was extracted by maceration with 95% EtOH. The antibacterial activity of the extract and its chemical constituents were determined by their MIC values using resazurin as an indicator. Time-kill profile was determined at 0, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, and 24 hrs and expressed as log CFU/mL. The anti-inflammatory activity of the extract and its chemical components was investigated by their inhibiting effect on IL-6 and TNF- production by ELISA. The ethanolic extract was analyzed for its chemical constituents by HPLC technique. The ethanolic extract showed both dose- and time-dependent bactericidal effects against , methicillin-resistance , , , , Typhi, Typhimurium, , and with MIC values of 312.5, 312.5, 312.5, 1,250, 2,500, 625, 625, 2,500, and 625 g/mL, respectively. It showed an inhibiting effect on IL-6 production at concentrations of 12.5 to 100 g/mL. The main active chemical constituent of was piceatannol that showed antibacterial activity against all test bacteria except . showed a broad spectrum of antibacterial activity against both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. Piceatannol and resveratrol from the plant strongly inhibited IL-6 production. Based on these results, we concluded that the ethanolic extract of showed both an antibacterial activity and inhibition of IL-6. Piceatannol is the active constituent of the extract and showed anti-inflammatory and antibacterial activities against Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2020/1653180DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7374238PMC
July 2020

and Anti-Inflammatory Activities of Benjakul: A Potential Medicinal Product from Thai Traditional Medicine.

Evid Based Complement Alternat Med 2020 14;2020:9760948. Epub 2020 Jul 14.

Department of Agricultural Food and Nutritional Science, Faculty of Agricultural Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB T6G 2P5, Canada.

Benjakul (BJK) is a Thai traditional remedy consisting of five plants: Hunt., Roxb., Opiz., Linn., and Roscoe. It is used as a first-line drug to balance patient's symptoms before other treatments. BJK ethanolic extract has been reported to show anti-inflammatory activity through various mediators, e.g., nitric oxide, TNF-, IL-1, and IL-6. Therefore, BJK could serve as a potential novel anti-inflammatory herbal medicine. However, studies on prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), one of the key mediators in acute inflammation, and anti-inflammation in animal models () have not been done. This study investigated the anti-inflammatory activity of BJK extract and some of its chemical compounds against PGE2 production in murine macrophage (RAW 264.7) cell line and two models of anti-inflammatory studies. Ethanolic extract of BJK (BJK[E]) showed high inhibitory activity against PGE2 production with an IC value of 5.82 ± 0.10 g/mL but its water extract (BJK[W]) was inactive. Two chemicals from BJK[E], i.e., plumbagin and myristicin, which served as biological markers, showed strong activity with IC values of 0.08 ± 0.01 and 1.80 ± 0.06 g/mL, respectively. BJK[E] was administered both topically and orally to rats inhibited with inflammation induced by ethyl phenylpropiolate (rat ear edema model) and carrageenan (hind paw edema model). Moreover, the biological activity of BJK extract did not reduce after six-month storage under accelerated condition (40°C, 75% RH). This indicated its stability and a 24-month shelf-life under normal condition. These results supported not only the use of BJK in Thai traditional medicine but also the possibility of further development of phytopharmaceutical products from BJK.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2020/9760948DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7376408PMC
July 2020